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BIOL& 241 Human Anatomy & Physiology I • 6 Cr.

Department

Division

Description:

Introduces the structure and function of tissues, organs, and systems of the human body. Both BIOL& 241 and BIOL& 242 are needed for a complete study of the anatomy and physiology of all human systems. Format includes laboratory work. Prerequisite: BIOL& 160 or BIOL& 211 with a C or better, or entry code.

Outcomes:

After completing this class, students should be able to:

  • When presented with a microslide, the student should be able to identify each of the 4 tissue types and their subcategories.
  • When presented with any major organ, the student should be able to describe the structure and function of that organ in terms of the structure, location and function of the tissues of which the organ is comprised.
  • The student should be able to match each gland with its secretions(s) and each secretion with its effect.
  • The student should be able to identify and locate via diagram, articulated or disarticulated skeleton, every bone of the human body.
  • When presented with any organ studied, the student should be able to describe that organ, using appropriate directional an anatomical terminology specific to that organ.
  • The student should be able to describe the exact position of each visceral organ in its appropriate cavity.
  • The student should be able to describe the contribution of each organ to the system of which it is a part.
  • The student should be able to describe the contribution each system makes to the integrity of the whole organism.
  • Given an abnormality, the student should be able to explain that abnormality in terms of the system and/or primary organ disrupted.
  • The student should be able to predict the consequences of any primary organ failure.
  • The student should be able to describe the structure and action of channel – linked, intramembranous and intracellular receptors.
  • Using appropriate terminology, the student should be able to explain the generation and spread of an action potential on a neuron, skeletal muscle fiber or cardiac muscle fiber.
  • Starting with the action potential entering a muscle fiber, the student should be able to identify and describe the steps leading to contraction in both skeletal and cardiac muscle.
  • The student should be able to identify and describe the action of the major excitatory and inhibitory neurotransmitters.
  • The student should be able to specifically locate and describe the function of each of the brain’s major functional areas and systems and/or predict the effect of damage to any of these areas.
  • The student should be able to trace any somatic an autonomic reflex presented in the course from a receptor to an effector, identifying the stimulus, receptor type, neurons, nerves, neurotransmitters, ganglia and spinal pathways (where relevant).
  • The student should be able to describe the anatomical and physiological differences between the parasympathetic and sympathetic divisions of the autonomic nervous system.
  • The student should be able to describe the specifics of autonomic control of any system that include glands, smooth muscle and/or cardiac muscle.
  • The student should be able to match all cranial nerves and major nerves derived from somatic plexuses with the organs they innervate and the functions they control.
  • The student should be able to trace an impulse along a motor pathway from its source in the brain to its effector and along a sensory pathway from a receptor to its primary somesthetic area of the brain.
  • Using anatomical diagrams, the student should be able to locate and identify the major superficial skeletal muscles of the body.
  • The student should be able to explain the differences between, and give examples of, both negative and positive feedback.
  • The student should be able to identify the stimulus, source, target, effect and control of each of the hormones presented in this course.
  • Using anatomical diagrams and/or their dissected pig, the student should be able to locate and identify all the major arteries and veins.
  • Starting with the right atrium, the student should be able to trace blood flow through the pulmonary and systemic diversions of the circulatory system, with special emphasis on the cerebral, coronary, hepatic – portal and renal patterns of circulation.
  • Starting with the sinoartial node, the student should be able to trace the transmission of impulses to the myocardium and explain the correlation between this transmission and the defections of an EKG.
  • Cardiac output, blood volume, peripheral resistance and vessel elasticity are all factors that influence blood pressure. The student should be able to identify and explain all the variables that determine each of these factors as well as predict the consequences of changing any of the variables.
  • Given the blood hydrostatic pressure and blood osmotic pressure of the arteriole and venous ends of a capillary, the student should be able to calculate net filtration pressure, net absorption pressure and the net movement of fluids into or out of the capillary.
  • The student should be able to identify and describe the causes, consequences, prevention and treatments for the major cardiovascular abnormalities.
  • The student should be able to identify the source, morphology and functions of all the formed elements of the blood.
  • The student should be able to describe in detail the components and steps included within blood clot formation and an immune response.
  • The student should be able to explain the dynamics of fluid, electrolyte, blood gas and nutrient distribution and exchange.
  • If a system involves a tract, the student should be able to trace the movement of the appropriate substane (air, food, urin, gametes) through the tract.
  • Given an organ system, the students should be able to explain how that system accomplishes its mission.
  • The student should be able to explain the dynamics of respiratory, buffer and renal control of pH balance.

Offered:

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Contact info

Bellevue College
3000 Landerholm Circle SE Bellevue, WA 98007-6484 U.S.A.
Work: (425) 564-1000