American Indian Film Festival - Bellevue Community College

Wednesday, Thursday, and Friday, April 12, 13, and 14, 2006

Bellevue Community College

(For directions: http://www.bcc.ctc.edu/about/around/directions/main/)

 

Summary and thanks

 

 

Wednesday, April 12, 2006

 

 

10:30 am

Carlson

Opening Ceremony with Snoqualmie Drum Group

 

 

Voyage of Rediscovery – (1990, 46 minutes)

Phil Lucas is the producer, director and writer of this television documentary on Frank Brown, a Heiltsuk Native American from Bella Bella, British Columbia who was banished instead of being sent to a juvenile detention center. In 1986 he brought a fleet of canoes down to Expo 86 in Vancouver and organized the 1989 Paddle to Seattle.

 

 

11:30 am

Carlson

Panel on the Canoe Journey and Native Youth

Frank Brown, subject of film and ecotourism entrepreneur, Willard Bill Jr., Native American Program Manager for Seattle Schools and Muckleshoot canoe family member/skipper, and John Mullen, skipper of the Snoqualmie canoe family, will talk on the resurgence of the canoe culture.

 

 

12:30 pm

Carlson

Pulling Together – (2005, 90 minutes) Feature documentary on the 2003 Canoe Journey for the Muckleshoot Canoe Family. The Muckleshoot Tribe will be hosting this year’s canoe journey.

 

 

2:30 pm

Carlson

Canoes

Slide presentation and talk on canoe building, canoe handling and the Canoe Journeys by Shaun Peterson, Steve Brown, Joe Gobin and Jason Gobin. Shaun and Jason are both accomplished Salish artists who have participated in several Canoe Journeys, and have worked with the late Jerry Jones of Tulalip on canoes and related projects. Joe has participated in many canoe borne journeys and ceremonies, beginning when he worked with Jerry Jones on the first new Tulalip canoe for the Paddle to Seattle in 1989. Brown has carved twelve canoes since 1973, in Washington, British Columbia, and Alaska, and has documented these in 35mm slide format.

 

 

   

 

7:30 pm

Carlson

Spiral of Fire (2006, 90 minutes) takes author and historian LeAnne Howe (Choctaw) goes to the North Carolina homeland of the Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians to discover how their fusion of tourism, cultural preservation and spirituality is the key to their tribe’s health in the 21st century. Along the way Howe seeks to reconcile her own identity as the daughter of a Cherokee father she never knew. Part of Indian Country Diaries to be broadcast on PBS this fall. Phil Lucas and Hanay Geiogamah are Senior Producers.

 

Executive Producer, Frank Blythe (Eastern Cherokee), will introduce the film and talk afterwards. Frank Blythe is the Executive Director of Native American Public Telecommunications (NAPT), a  non-profit corporation, where he manages the production and distribution of American Indian films, videos, and radio programming to the Public Broadcasting System and the American Indian Radio On Satellite Network.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Thursday, April 13, 2006

 

 

10:30 am

N201

A Seat at the Drum  (2006, 90 minutes) Journalist and playwright Mark Anthony Rolo (Bad River Ojibwe), seeks to learn how Native Americans in Los Angeles preserve a tribal identity, survive economically and cope with the pressures of assimilation in a challenging metropolis. His personal quest to come to terms with these issues leads him to meet Native community leaders, Indians relocated from reservations, boarding school students, Native business leaders and single parent families whose stories typify the experiences of urban Indians. Part of Indian Country Diaries to be broadcast on PBS this fall. Executive Producer, Frank Blythe, will answer questions on the film. Phil Lucas and Hanay Geiogamah are Senior Producers.

 

 

12:30 pm

N201

Gary Farmer Talks

Actor, cultural activist, musician and filmmaker, Gary Farmer (Cayuga) is widely recognized as a pioneer in the development of First Nations media. Farmer has been featured in groundbreaking leading roles including Philbert Bono in Jonathan Wacks' "Powwow Highway" and Arnold Joseph in Chris Eyre's "Smoke Signals." For his role as Nobody in Jim Jarmusch's "Dead Man," Farmer won the Best Actor awards in 1997 from both the American Indian Film Festival in San Francisco and First Americans in the Arts in Los Angeles. Farmer also won the Best Actor award at the 1989 American Indian Film Festival for his role in "Powwow Highway."

 

 

1:30 pm

N201

American Red and Black: Stories of Afro-Native identity (2006, 40 minutes), with filmmaker Alicia Woods. This moving documentary follows Vella, a self-identified African American, as she researches and reflects on her Native American heritage.  Interwoven into her story are interviews with Afro-Natives, representing tribes from across the United States that explore topics such as the relationship between art and ethnic identity and racism within communities of color.

 

 

2:30 pm

N201

The Border Crossed Us (2005, 26 minutes), with producer Rachael J. Nez
This powerful film tells the story of the Tohono O’odham people and their struggles with the U.S. – Mexican border.

 

 

3:30 pm

N201

Dead Man (1996, 90 minutes) William Blake (Johnny Depp) travels to the extreme western frontiers of America sometime in the second half of the 19th century. Lost and badly wounded, he encounters a very odd, outcast Native American (Gary Farmer), named Nobody,  who believes Blake is actually the dead English poet. Nobody leads William Blake through situations that are in turn comical and violent, transforming Blake into a hunted outlaw, a killer, and a man whose physical existence is slowly slipping away. Written and directed by Jim Jarmusch.

 

5:30 pm

N201

Usual and Accustomed Places (2000, 48 minutes) This account of the Pacific Northwest tribes' century-long struggle to uphold their fishing rights focuses on the history of the Makah Nation of Washington State.

 

 

7:30 pm

Carlson

The Gift and Gary Farmer talks.  
 

Friday, April 14, 2006

 

 

10:30 am

N201

Trudell (2005, 80 minutes) Directed by Heather Rae, with screenwriter B. Russell Friedenberg, this film was featured in the U.S. documentary competition at the 2005 Sundance Film Festival. Heather Rae spent more than a decade chronicling Trudell's travels, spoken word and politics in a poetic manner. The film combines archival, concert and interview footage with abstract imagery. ''Trudell'' begins in the late '60s when Trudell and a community group, Indians of All Tribes, occupied Alcatraz Island for 21 months, giving birth to the contemporary Indian people's movement.

 

12:30 pm

N201

Heather Rae Talks

Director of the Native American Program for the Sundance Institute from 1995 to 2001, Heather Rae (Cherokee) nurtured the work of more than fifty emerging Native American screenwriters and filmmakers. She has also worked to develop the field of Native filmmaking through her work with Akatubi Entertainment's Film and Music Program on reservations throughout the West. In 2005 she premiered "Trudell," which she directed, at the Sundance Film Festival.

 

 

2:30 pm

C130

Potluck

 

 

3:30 pm

C120

Swinomish Native Lens participants are working with Tulalip and Suquamish youth to produce a series of new shorts about their relationship with the environment. These films are funded through grants from the Environmental Protection Agency, and the Swinomish, Tulalip, and Suquamish Tribes. Come view some of their shorts at this session.

 

 
7:30 pm

Kirkland Performance Center

Trudell, the film, and Heather Rae

at the Kirkland Performance Center

350 Kirkland Ave.
Kirkland, WA (Exit 18 on 405)

www.kpcenter.org for directions

Trudell (2005, 80 minutes) Directed by Heather Rae, with screenwriter B. Russell Friedenberg, this film was featured in the U.S. documentary competition at the 2005 Sundance Film Festival. Rae spent more than a decade chronicling Trudell's travels, spoken word and politics in a poetic manner. The film combines archival, concert and interview footage with abstract imagery. ''Trudell'' begins in the late '60s when Trudell and a community group, Indians of All Tribes, occupied Alcatraz Island for 21 months, giving birth to the contemporary Indian people's movement.

 

 

 Suggested Donation $10.

 

 
  Thanks for our sponsors: the TRIO program, BCC Campus Activities Board, the Squaxin Tribe, the Muckleshoot Tribe, the Kirkland Performance Center, First Nations Student Club, and the BCC Foundation.

Last updated: 4/7/06 Contact:  Leslie Lum llum@bcc.ctc.edu