Upcoming Courses

 2016-2017 Preview*

Fall 2016

  • “Bite Me: Consumption and Sustainability in the U.S.” with Michael Hanson & Michael Meyer
    • Frankenfood or Organic; Hemp or Polyester; Mansion or Condo – How do you choose? Bacteria genes in tomatoes, hormones in meat, insecticides in potatoes – Do you know what’s in your food? The focus of this course is the impacts of lifestyle choices in regard to food, clothing and shelter. We will examine our behaviors, choices, responsibilities and the consequences of our actions to our communities, nation and the entire globe by investigating ecosystem interconnections. Through our readings and discussions, we will evaluate diverse opinions and values in order to scrutinize our own personal beliefs.
    • Credit for ENGL& 101, 201, 271, 272, or 226 AND ENVS& 100, NUTR 100, BIOL& 100, or BOTAN 110 (10-11 credits)
  • “The Good Life: Finding Your Place in School and Life” with Sue Cox & Isaiah Hemmen
    • How do I create the good life for myself? For that matter, how do I make it through college? Begin to answer these questions while developing your sociology and English skills through reading, writing, discussing, and interacting with guest speakers in “The Good Life.”
    • Credit for ENGL 092, 093, or 101 AND SOC& 101 (10 credits)
  • “CSI Bellevue: Who Did It?!” with Gina Fiorini, Allison Kang, & Tony Tessandori
    • Do you need biology and chemistry for an allied health field or a transfer degree? CSI Bellevue is an integrated learning community. Through hands-on activities you will learn how to use biology and chemistry to solve crimes! Accelerate your entry into A&P while learning science through the lens of forensics and anthropology! Then you will be able to answer the question “Who Did It?”
    • Credit for CHEM 121 AND BIOL& 160 AND ANTH 125 (17 credits)

Winter 2017

 

Bite Me 2.0: Food Security and Sustainability” with Michael Hanson & Michael Meyer

Drive-thru or dining room table? Factory-processed or home-grown? Broccoli, barley, beans or edible food-like substances? What’s cheap about cheap food? Is all food equal? What is real? Do you eat for nutrients, taste or cost? The focus of this course is the impacts of lifestyle choices in regard to food. We will examine our behaviors, choices, and responsibilities and consequences of our actions to our communities, nation and the entire globe by investigating ecosystem interconnections. Through our readings and discussions, we will evaluate diverse opinions and values in order to scrutinize our own personal beliefs.

 

  • Learning Outcomes 
    • Demonstrate verbally and in writing, how each human has an impact on sustainability.
    • Demonstrate the importance of using critical thinking and the scientific method to understand how human activities affect the limited resources of our planet.
    • Demonstrate the ability to differentiate their personal opinions and assumptions from the author’s.
    • Practice teamwork and collaboration skills to explore ideas cooperatively, respect others’ insights and opinions and develop areas of consensus and agreement.
    • Develop attitudes of responsibility for one’s own learning.
    • Demonstrate skills for carrying on productive dialogue on controversial topics.
    • Demonstrate critical reading skills to be able to understand, compare and contrast, and evaluate the strength of an author’s argument.

Who Do You Think You Are? Biology, Race, and the Finding of Self” with Jason Fuller & Kim Pollock

Who are you? Where do you come from? What information is hidden in your DNA? Come with us on a journey into your past that can help you figure out directions for the future. We will explore the connections between the ‘facts’ that science provides us, and the stories that we construct to explain what those ‘facts’ mean. Let’s explore race and biology, and figure out who we are.

  • Learning Outcomes
  • Students will draw conclusions about the biological basis of race.
  • Students will trace parts of their own family tree.
  • Students will construct an autobiographical document that helps place themselves in their own history.
  • Students will analyze the genetic basis of their own particular ancestry.

Coming to America: History and Literature of Immigration to the U.S.” with Brian Casserly & Hyesu Park

This Interdisciplinary course will explore the history and literature of the U.S. immigration, from the 1600s to the start of the 21st century. Students will examine some of the major changes and developments in the history of immigration to the U.S. while also reflecting on these moments through literary representations of history.

Earn 10 credits from ENGL 111 (5 cr), ENGL 219 (5 cr), or ENGL& 101; and HIST 246 (5 cr) or HIST 294 (5 cr).

  • Learning Outcomes
  • Recognize the narrative and literary elements of the history of US immigration and the historical background of the US Immigrant literature, and understand the intersections between history and literature.
  • Analyze and critically evaluate primary and secondary sources, both historical and literary.
  • Recognize and identify key developments and issues in the diverse history of immigration to the US, and understand how they are reflected in the US immigrant literature.
  • Understand the ways in which literature is shaped by and shapes the reality.
  • Analyze the motivations and experiences of a range of immigrant groups from colonial times to the present, and examine how they are represented in various narrative forms.

Spring 2017

  • Mind Your Language: The Psychology of Intercultural Communication” with Jen Anderson & Deepti Karkhanis
  • Fighting for the Planet: The Political Economy of Climate Change” with David Spataro & BJ Unti
  • The Wire: Life on the Street and the War on Drugs” with Eric Davis, Charlene Freyberg, & Natalie Martinez
  • What is Black? Blackness in the Modern Diaspora” with Kim Pollock & Wairimu Kiambuthi

* Note: all “preview” courses for the upcoming academic year are subject to change. 

Last Updated November 22, 2016