Legal Issues

Copyright Information for Educators – Online Selfpaced – Starts January 14th

Greetings and welcome to the Copyright Information for Educators course made available to you through eLearning! As you plan your online courses you will be curious about how copyright rules affect your teaching in class, in Canvas, and beyond? This is online self-paced workshop has been developed by our Bellevue College Librarians. Upon successful completion of this …more about Copyright Information for Educators – Online Selfpaced – Starts January 14th


Canvas 101: Teaching with Canvas, Accessibility 101: Principles of Inclusive Design and Copyright Information for Educators

Teaching with Canvas: Canvas 101 Canvas 101 is perfect for new online instructors, and it is modular so instructors with varied backgrounds and experience can select the order of the modules that best apply to their needs. This online based workshop is intended to introduce instructors to the available tools in Canvas. It is self-paced, project-based, and guided–a facilitator will be available to answer …more about Canvas 101: Teaching with Canvas, Accessibility 101: Principles of Inclusive Design and Copyright Information for Educators


Addressing Cheating on Principle

“The point is this – contract cheating providers exist, they exist to serve your students, and your students are using them. Brad Wolverton, in “The New Economy of Cheating” (Chronicle of Higher Education, August 28, 2016, subscription required), estimates that the annual revenue for one of the largest contract cheating providers is “in the millions”. The UK’s Quality Assurance Agency (QAA) “Plagiarism in Higher Education” (August 2016) report also posits that the industry is expansive, likely involving thousands of students every year.” – Tricia Bertram Gallant, Ph.D.



Accessibility in Online Learning

It’s the law, it’s in the news and it assures that all qualified students receive the same opportunity to succeed here at BC.


Harvard and MIT Sued Over Closed Captions

The National Association of the Deaf (NAD) filed federal lawsuits against Harvard and M.I.T., saying both universities violated antidiscrimination laws by failing to provide closed captioning in their online lectures, courses, podcasts and other educational materials.