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Classes offered

Anthropology

Need more info? Visit the Anthropology website.

ANTH& 100 Survey of Anthropology • 5 Cr.

An introductory course on the cultures and biology of humans, from scientific and humanistic perspectives. Explores all four fields of anthropology: archaeology (ancient cultures), cultural anthropology (contemporary cultures and cultural diversity), biological anthropology (primates, genetics, evolution, and human biological diversity), and linguistics (language and communication).

ANTH 101 Introduction to North American Archaeology • 5 Cr.

An introduction to the archaeology and environments of North America. Journey back in time and across the continent to learn how native peoples adapted and lived their daily lives. A consideration of prehistory from a global perspective is addressed, as well as the plight of modern descendants.

ANTH 102 Intro Mexican and Central American Archaeology • 5 Cr.

Journey through time to the spectacular prehistoric ruins of the Aztec, Maya, and many other native cultures of Mexico and Central America. Discover how ancient inhabitants dealt with earthquakes, volcanic eruptions, droughts, and other environmental challenges. Connections to contemporary populations are addressed and the place of prehistoric Mesoamerica in global history is considered.

ANTH 103 Introduction to South American Archaeology • 5 Cr.

The vast continent of South America was the home for numerous prehistoric adaptations in diverse landscapes. Explore the magnificent ruins of the Inca, Moche, Nazca, Wari, and ancient peoples of the Amazon Basin. South American archaeology in global context is addressed, as well as the plight of modern descendants.

ANTH 104 Great Discoveries in Archaeology • 5 Cr.

Covers how ancient remains are recovered, the politics of 'discovering' such remains, and what these remains mean within a scientific framework. A critical evaluation of world famous sites (such as the cave paintings at Lascaux, Old Kingdom Egyptian Pyramids, Great Zimbabwe, Machu Picchu, Classic Maya site of Copán, Ozette in Washington state, and more) will highlight key factors, such as racism and sexism, that influence interpretation of the past. An awareness of legal responsibilities facing world citizens and their collective past will be increased. A large visual component will illustrate salient points of the course.

ANTH 107 Great Discoveries in World Archaeology • 5 Cr.

Exploration of some of the most well-known archaeological discoveries from the distant and recent past (such as Olduvai Gorge, Ice Age Caves, Jericho, Egyptian pyramids, Harappa, Stonehenge, Xianyang, Teotihuacan, Cahokia, Mesa Verde, Great Zimbabwe, Chichén Itzá, Machu Picchu, Ozette, etc). Offers global coverage and scientific interpretation incorporating a large visual component.

ANTH 108 Food, Drink and Culture • 5 Cr.

Embark on an eating and drinking adventure and discover the roots of your cuisine. A cross-cultural and global view of food and drink that examines these essentials of life from the cultural, biological, archaeological and linguistic perspectives of anthropology. The phrase "You are what you eat (and drink)" takes on new and profound meanings. Previously ANTH 214.

ANTH& 125 Human Variation • 5 Cr.

Examines the biological basis for population human variation, as well as cultural diversity in the interpretations of these differences. Examine contemporary populations and their distribution of body form, features, skeletal structures and skin color. As well as the cultural, ecological and evolutionary forces that shape human diversity and behavior.

ANTH 180 American Life & Culture • 5 Cr.

A view of American culture from the broad lens of anthropology. Topics include American popular culture, the historical background to American social and cultural values, and the effect of economic and political changes in American life. Situates American culture and society in the context of a globalized world. Same as CES 180. Either ANTH 180 or CES 180 may be taken for credit, not both.

ANTH 194 Special Topics in Anthropology • V1-10 Cr.

Covers supplementary or unusual classes related to the field. Topics are announced in the class schedule.

ANTH 195 Special Topics in Anthropology • V1-10 Cr.

Covers supplementary or unusual classes related to the field. Topics are announced in the class schedule.

ANTH 196 Special Topics in Anthropology • V1-10 Cr.

Covers supplementary or unusual classes related to the field. Topics are announced in the class schedule.

ANTH 197 Special Topics in Anthropology • V1-10 Cr.

Covers supplementary or unusual classes related to the field. Topics are announced in the class schedule.

ANTH 198 Seminar in Anthropology • V1-10 Cr.

Includes seminars, workshops, etc., for which college credit is offered.

ANTH 199 Individual Studies in Anthropology • V1-10 Cr.

Covers directed readings, special projects, and independent study by an individual student. May be repeated for a maximum of 15 credits. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.

ANTH& 204 Archaeology • 5 Cr.

Finding and digging sites is just the beginning of unearthing the past. Archaeologists are scientists who specialize in survey and excavation, as well as analysis and interpretation of ancient and historical remains. The methods, techniques, and goals of archaeology are highlighted to provide a basis on which to understand the rich record of the past. Previously ANTH 105.

ANTH& 205 Biological Anthropology • 5 Cr.

An anthropological view of how human biological characteristics arose, our relation to non-human primates, and how we continue to be shaped by evolutionary forces. Major topics include human genetics, adaptation, monkeys, apes and prosimians, fossil evidence for human evolution and the study of biological diversity in contemporary human populations. Either ANTH& 205 or ANTH& 215 may be taken for credit, not both. Note: Fulfills Science course requirement at BC. Previously ANTH 201.

ANTH& 206 Cultural Anthropology • 5 Cr.

Cultural anthropologists are social scientists who learn first-hand about other cultures by living with the people under study. Topics may include social organization, economics, power and politics, race and ethnicity, language and communication, technology, religion and ritual, and sex and gender. Wide geographic coverage provides a basis for global comparisons of cultural similarities and differences between human groups. Previously ANTH 202.

ANTH 208 Language, Culture and Society • 5 Cr.

Explores the role of language in culture and society. Course covers tools for analyzing language, and examines cross-cultural and cross-linguistic variation. There is a focus on cultural and social issues, such as attitudes toward regional and social dialects, correlations between social groupings and language behavior, the influence of language on thought, and the life and death of languages. Note: Fulfills Humanities course requirement at BC. Previously ANTH 200.

ANTH& 215 Bioanthropology w/Lab • 6 Cr.

A hands-on laboratory approach to human biological characteristics, non-human primates, and evolutionary forces. Major topics include human genetics, adaptation, prosimians, monkeys and apes, fossil evidence for human evolution, and the study of biological diversity in contemporary human populations. Either ANTH& 205 or ANTH& 215 may be taken for credit, not both. Note: Fulfills Laboratory Science course requirement at BC. Recommended ANTH& 100.

ANTH 219 Sociolinguistics • 5 Cr.

What can you tell about people from the way they speak? This course investigates the way social factors, such as age, gender and social class, affect the way people talk. The course also addresses how social and political changes can affect the language we use. Fulfills Social Science course requirement at BC.

ANTH 220 Sex, Gender and Culture • 5 Cr.

An evolutionary, comparative, and holistic approach to sex and gender from the theoretical perspective of Anthropology. Explores the concepts of sex and gender through all four sub-fields (cultural anthropology, biological anthropology, archaeology, and linguistics). Readings examine both non-Western and Western cultures, illustrating how ideas about sex and gender vary in different times and cultures. Recommended: ANTH& 100.

ANTH 222 Environment and Culture • 5 Cr.

Investigates human and cultural systems as part of the ecosystem from the dual lenses of cultural ecology and human ecology. Cross-cultural comparisons of indigenous knowledge and cultural adaptations through time. Scientific modeling of social behaviors and long-term environmental modifications. Contemplates current environmental problems and potential solutions. Recommended: ANTH& 100.

ANTH 224 Anthropology of Music • 5 Cr.

Introduction to the academic discipline of ethnomusicology. The class is built around student participation in a field project, in which students will document, analyze and report on selected regional musical cultures. Covers the history, theoretical constructs and terminology of the discipline, and the ethics and methods of field work. Recommended: ANTH& 100.

ANTH 230 Bones, Stones, Fire and Clay • 5 Cr.

Delve into the earliest forms of human technology with this hands-on course that traces the evolution of tools from their earliest origins, millions years ago up to the end of the Stone Age. Students directly engage with materials through a quarter-long project that moves through the progression of tool technologies. Prerequisite: ANTH& 215 or ANTH& 205 prerequisite/co-requisite.

ANTH 232 Film and Culture • 5 Cr.

Documentary films are a popular way to examine real life that often rivals Hollywood. Combining the methods of film-making with the lens of anthropology offers students the perspective of visual anthropology. This field broadens your horizons by analyzing films from around the world and delving into the history, methods, and theories of the industry. Experiential learning through production of documentaries. Recommended: ANTH& 100.

ANTH& 234 Religion & Culture • 5 Cr.

A global introduction to the religions of the world from a broad comparative perspective. Students examine the development and aspects of various religions (indigenous, Islam, Judaism, Buddhism, Hinduism, Christianity, and others). The relationship between religion and the social and cultural context are explored, especially in relation to nationalism, politics, and globalization.

ANTH& 235 Cross-Cultural Medicine • 5 Cr.

Everyone gets sick at some point in their lives, but how this sickness is viewed and treated is a cultural phenomenon. View health, disease, sickness, and healing from a global lens through the consideration of biology, culture, and political and economic systems. Knowledge of the rapidly expanding field of medical anthropology is essential for future health practitioners for competency in dealing with diverse patients. Recommended: ANTH& 100.

ANTH& 236 Forensic Anthropology • 5 Cr.

Popular TV shows highlight forensics, but how accurate are they and what is this field of study? Covers the tools of the experts in analyzing crime scenes and solving mysteries. Numerous methods, including skeletal analysis, recovery of evidence, and body decomposition, all contribute to resolution of medical and legal investigations. Recommended: ANTH& 204 or ANTH& 205. Previously ANTH 207.

ANTH 294 Special Topics in Anthropology • V1-10 Cr.

Covers supplementary or unusual classes related to the field. Topics are announced in the class schedule.

ANTH 295 Special Topics in Anthropology • V1-10 Cr.

Covers supplementary or unusual classes related to the field. Topics are announced in the class schedule.

ANTH 296 Special Topics in Anthropology • V1-10 Cr.

Covers supplementary or unusual classes related to the field. Topics are announced in the class schedule.

ANTH 297 Special Topics in Anthropology • V1-10 Cr.

Covers supplementary or unusual classes related to the field. Topics are announced in the class schedule.

ANTH 298 Seminar in Anthropology • V1-10 Cr.

Includes seminars, workshops, etc., for which college credit is offered.

ANTH 299 Individual Studies in Anthropology • V1-10 Cr.

Covers directed readings, special projects, and independent study by an individual student. May be repeated for a maximum of 15 credits. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.