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Recreation Leadership

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ABE 040 Academic Skills Lab • V1-2 Cr.

Students work independently with instructor support to develop skills in content areas of choice such as reading, writing, math, social studies, science, GED® and technology. Prerequisite: ABE Orientation and advising.

ABE 041 Adult Basic Education Lab Level 1 • V1-5 Cr.

The Basic Skills Learning Lab provides students in Adult Basic Education classes additional opportunities to further build skills in the areas of reading, writing, and math. As well as receiving computerized assisted learning through a variety of software, students can work independently with tutors or together in small groups. Prerequisite: Assessment into the ABE or GED Program.

ABE 042 Adult Basic Education Lab Level 2 • V1-5 Cr.

The Basic Skills Learning Lab provides students in Adult Basic Education classes additional opportunities to further build skills in the areas of reading, writing, and math. As well as receiving computerized assisted learning through a variety of software, students can work independently with tutors or together in small groups. Prerequisite: Assessment into the ABE or GED Program.

ABE 043 Adult Basic Education Lab Level 3 • V1-5 Cr.

The Basic Skills Learning Lab provides students in Adult Basic Education classes additional opportunities to further build skills in the areas of reading, writing, and math. As well as receiving computerized assisted learning through a variety of software, students can work independently with tutors or together in small groups. Prerequisite: Assessment into the ABE or GED Program.

ABE 044 Adult Basic Education Lab Level 4 • V1-5 Cr.

The Basic Skills Learning Lab provides students in Adult Basic Education classes additional opportunities to further build skills in the areas of reading, writing, and math. As well as receiving computerized assisted learning through a variety of software, students can work independently with tutors or together in small groups. Prerequisite: Assessment into the ABE or GED Program.

ABE 051 Math 1 • V1-10 Cr.

Emphasizes development of strategies to effectively solve mathematical problems for high school completion, and college and career readiness. Students meet class objectives through the analysis of numbers, place values, shapes and measurement to solve addition and subtraction problems. Students build their math vocabulary as well as note taking and technology skills. Prerequisite: ABE Orientation and advising.

ABE 052 Math 2 • V1-10 Cr.

Emphasizes development of strategies to effectively solve mathematical problems for high school completion, and college and career readiness. Students meet class objectives through the analysis of numbers, place values, shapes and measurement to solve addition, subtraction, multiplication and division problems. Students build their math vocabulary as well as note taking and technology skills. Prerequisite: ABE Orientation and advising.

ABE 053 Math 3 • V1-10 Cr.

Emphasizes development of strategies to effectively solve mathematical problems for high school completion, and college and career readiness. Students meet class objectives through the analysis of numbers, place values, shapes and measurement to solve addition, subtraction, multiplication and division problems with whole numbers, decimals, fractions and percents. Students build their math vocabulary as well as note taking and technology skills. Prerequisite: ABE Orientation and advising.

ABE 054 Math 4 • V1-10 Cr.

Emphasizes development of strategies to effectively solve mathematical problems for high school completion, and college and career readiness. Students meet class objectives through the use of fractions, percents, ratios, and proportions to solve problems relating to measurements, geometry and basic algebra. Students build their math vocabulary as well as note taking and technology skills. Prerequisite: ABE Orientation and advising.

ABE 060 ABE Orientation • V1-4 Cr.

Orients students to the ABE, GED, and HSC programs. Students will become familiar with college resources, assess their skills in reading, writing and math, develop college and career goals, and meet with a faculty advisor to determine an initial academic plan.

ABE 061 English 1 • V1-10 Cr.

Emphasizes development of strategies to effectively communicate in English for high school completion, and college and career readiness. Students read and report on books, short stories, graphs, maps, and informational text that relate to social studies, science and literature. Students meet composition objectives by writing complete sentences in short answers, notes, and paragraphs. Students build their vocabulary for reading and writing as well as improve spelling and technology skills. Prerequisite: ABE Orientation and advising.

ABE 062 English 2 • V1-10 Cr.

Emphasizes development of strategies to effectively communicate in English for high school completion, and college and career readiness. Students read and report on books, short stories, graphs, maps, and informational text that relate to social studies, science and literature. Students meet composition objectives by writing complete sentences in short answers, notes, and paragraphs. Students build their vocabulary for reading and writing as well as improve spelling and technology skills. Prerequisite: ABE Orientation and advising.

ABE 063 English 3 • V1-10 Cr.

Emphasizes development of strategies to effectively communicate in English for high school completion, and college and career readiness. Students read and report on books, short stories, graphs, maps, and informational text that relate to social studies, science and literature. Students meet composition objectives by writing complete sentences in short answers, notes, and paragraphs. Students build their vocabulary for reading and writing as well as improve spelling and technology skills. Prerequisite: ABE Orientation and advising.

ABE 064 English 4 • V1-10 Cr.

Emphasizes development of strategies to effectively communicate in English for high school completion, and college and career readiness. Students read and report on fiction and non-fiction texts that relate to social studies, science and literature. Students meet composition objectives by writing well-organized and well-developed paragraphs and essays. Students develop their technology skills to complete a variety of tasks. Prerequisite: ABE Orientation and advising.

ACCT 101 Practical Accounting I • 5 Cr.

Introduces the use of journals and ledgers for reporting business transactions. Students learn periodic adjustments, closing procedures, and preparation of financial statements. Not recommended for students transferring to four-year baccalaureate degree programs. Most four-year universities do not accept this course for credit towards baccalaureate degree requirements.

ACCT 102 Practical Accounting II • 5 Cr.

Covers accounting procedures for corporations and partnerships and analysis of financial statements. Not recommended for students transferring to four-year baccalaureate degree programs. Most four-year universities do not accept this course for credit towards baccalaureate degree requirements. Prerequisite: ACCT 101 with a C or better, or ACCT& 201with a C or better, or entry code.

ACCT 135 Business Payroll Tax Accounting • 3 Cr.

Examines systems and operations of payroll tax accounting. Students learn to prepare Form 941, 940, and W-2. The use of software such as Microsoft Excel is incorporated into the course. Topics include the Fair Labor Standards Act and Social Security Act. Recommended: ACCT 101.

ACCT 146 10-Key • 1 Cr.

Introduction to the computer 10-key, keypad and the functions of the desktop calculator. Recommended: Previous computer experience or permission of the instructor. Previously BTS 146. Either BTS 146 or ACCT 146 may be taken for credit, but not both.

ACCT 160 Washington State: Tax and Audit • 5 Cr.

This course will cover the State of Washington tax requirements, reporting and audit procedures. Topics covered will include State Unemployment, Labor & Industries, Department of Revenue - B&O and Business Property Tax. State audit processes will be covered and how companies can prepare for an audit, interpret the findings and the appeal process. Recommended: ACCT 101 or ACCT& 201.

ACCT 172 Small Business Computerized Accounting • 5 Cr.

Applies computer software solutions to specific accounting problems. Topics include accounts receivable, accounts payable, depreciation, payroll, ledgers, and financial statements. Recommended: ACCT 101 or ACCT& 201.

ACCT 194 Special Topics in Practical Accounting • V1-10 Cr.

Allows specialized or in-depth study of a subject supplementing the Practical Accounting curriculum. Topics are announced in the quarterly schedule. May be repeated for a maximum of 15 credits.

ACCT 195 Special Topics in Practical Accounting • V1-10 Cr.

Allows specialized or in-depth study of a subject supplementing the Practical Accounting curriculum. Topics are announced in the quarterly schedule. May be repeated for a maximum of 15 credits.

ACCT 196 Special Topics in Practical Accounting • V1-10 Cr.

Allows specialized or in-depth study of a subject supplementing the Practical Accounting curriculum. Topics are announced in the quarterly schedule. May be repeated for a maximum of 15 credits.

ACCT 197 Special Topics in Practical Accounting • V1-10 Cr.

Allows specialized or in-depth study of a subject supplementing the Practical Accounting curriculum. Topics are announced in the quarterly schedule. May be repeated for a maximum of 15 credits.

ACCT 199 Individual Studies in Accounting • V1-10 Cr.

Covers directed readings, special projects, and independent study by an individual student. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.

ACCT& 201 Principles of Accounting I • 5 Cr.

Presents the nature and social setting of accounting, uses of accounting information, and basic concepts and procedures. The first accounting course required of business administration students planning to transfer to a four year college or university. Prerequisites: ENGL& 101 with a C or better. Math 138 or higher with C or better.

ACCT& 202 Principles of Accounting II • 5 Cr.

Presents basic concepts used in financial reporting and interpreting financial statements. Prerequisite: ACCT& 201 with a C or better or entry code.

ACCT& 203 Principles of Accounting III • 5 Cr.

Analyzes and evaluates accounting information as part of the control, planning, and decision-making processes. Students concentrate on the use of information by business managers and decision makers. Prerequisite: ACCT& 202 with a C or better or entry code.

ACCT 225 Survey of Financial and Managerial Accounting • 5 Cr.

Provide students in non-accounting programs an introduction to the world of financial and managerial accounting. The course will emphasize how financial data is used through the organization and how that data is transformed into useful information to support business decisions. Not recommended for students in a paraprofessional or transfer accounting programs. Not for Accounting majors. Recommended: ENGL& 101.

ACCT 234 Managerial Accounting • 5 Cr.

Explores the use of managerial accounting techniques and analytical tools in business decision-making. Students focus on short- and long-range financial planning, management planning, and control. Prerequisite: ACCT 102 with a C or better, or entry code.

ACCT 240 Computerized Accounting • 5 Cr.

Using a mid-range accounting system, students complete all functions of a full accounting cycle. Topics include use of the general ledger, recording accounting transactions, accounts receivable, accounts payable, inventory, job costing, payroll, reporting and financial statements. Recommended: ACCT 101 or ACCT&201.

ACCT 245 Accounting Systems for the Enterprise • 5 Cr.

Using a mid-range accounting information system program, students collect and communicate strategically valuable information including: general ledger, accounts payable, accounts receivable, bank reconciliation, banking, purchase orders, invoicing, payroll, fixed assets, reporting, map business process flows and assure system security. Prerequisite: ACCT 101 with a C or better, ACCT& 201 with a C or better, or entry code.

ACCT 250 Intermediate Accounting I • 5 Cr.

In-depth examination of theoretical foundations of Accounting. Topics include cash flow, revenue recognition, lease accounting, and advanced financial reporting. Prerequisite: ACCT 102 or ACCT&202 with a C or better, or entry code.

ACCT 260 Governmental and Non-Profit Accounting • 5 Cr.

Presents a framework for accounting and financial reporting for government and not-for-profit organizations. Topics include general and special fund accounting for hospitals, charities, foundations, colleges and universities, and government agencies. Prerequisite: ACCT 102 or ACCT&202 with a C or better, or entry code.

ACCT 266 Microsoft Excel for Accounting • 5 Cr.

The course covers utilization of Excel as an ideal blend of accounting principles. The coverage includes detailed, step-by-step instruction on using Microsoft Excel in the accounting profession. It offers sequential progression of materials in both accounting and Excel topic. It includes accounting refresher topics, real-world accounting application, and supplemental resources that will allow the student to master Excel as an accountant. Prerequisites: ACCT 101, ACCT 102, BTS 165.

ACCT 272 QuickBooks Certification • 2 Cr.

This course is designed to prepare students for the QuickBooks User Certification Exam. The course will cover new features in the current release of QuickBooks Premier as well as provide a review of the overall program features. The certification exam will be taken in the last week of the quarter. Prerequisite: ACCT 172 with a C or better, or entry code.

ACCT 285 Federal Income Taxes I • 5 Cr.

Introduces the concepts and procedures for preparing personal federal income tax returns. Prerequisite: ACCT 102 or permission of instructor.

ACCT 288 Bookkeeping Certification • 10 Cr.

Prepares students to take the Certified Bookkeeper Examination administered by the American Institute of Certified Bookkeepers (AIPB). Topics: Adjusting and Correcting Entries, Depreciation, Payroll, Inventory, Internal Controls and Fraud Prevention. Additional fees are assessed for off-site testing. Prerequisites: ACCT 101, 102, 135, 234, 250, and 285 with a B- or better, or entry code.

ACCT 294 Special Topics in Accountancy/Finance • V1-10 Cr.

Allows in-depth study of subjects supplementing the accountancy curriculum. Topics are announced in the class schedule.

ACCT 295 Special Topics in Accountancy/Finance • V1-10 Cr.

Allows in-depth study of subjects supplementing the accountancy curriculum. Topics are announced in the class schedule.

ACCT 296 Special Topics in Accountancy/Finance • V1-10 Cr.

Allows in-depth study of subjects supplementing the accountancy curriculum. Topics are announced in the class schedule.

ACCT 297 Special Topics in Accountancy/Finance • V1-10 Cr.

Allows in-depth study of subjects supplementing the accountancy curriculum. Topics are announced in the class schedule.

ACCT 299 Individual Studies in Accounting • V1-10 Cr.

Covers directed readings, special projects, and independent study by an individual student. May be repeated for a maximum of 15 credits. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.

ACCT 300 Finance • 5 Cr.

An introduction to financial decision making. Topics include financial statement analysis, time value of money, risk and return, financial assets, securities valuation, capital budgeting, cost of capital, and capital structure. Prerequisite: Program Entry Requirements and ACCT 250.

ACCT 350 Intermediate Accounting II • 5 Cr.

Continuation of theoretical foundations of accounting. The course covers valuation of assets, business financing options and in-depth examination of lease accounting. Prerequisite: Admission to the program and ACCT 250.

ACCT 351 Intermediate Accounting III • 5 Cr.

Continuation of theoretical foundations of accounting. The course covers business capital structures, interim reporting, and advanced analysis of domestic and international financial statements and standards. Prerequisite: ACCT 350.

ACCT 360 Cost Accounting • 5 Cr.

Covers the purpose and the methods of cost accounting for an efficient and effective planning and control. It examines cost behavior and alternate costing methods including job-order, process, and standard cost accounting systems, as well as cost variances. It also covers budgets and profitability analysis. Prerequisite: Admission to the program and ACCT 234.

ACCT 370 Forensic Accounting • 5 Cr.

The course covers the application of advanced accounting topics and investigative expertise. The course includes application of legal issues in professional settings. The focus of measurement will be on auditing, financial data, and accounting activities. Recommended: may be taken along with ACCT 420 and 470. Prerequisites: Admission to BAS Accounting program, and ACCT 351 and 360.

ACCT 380 Environmental Accounting • 5 Cr.

The course covers utilization of advanced accounting topics with a focus on measurement of environmental costs and benefits in the decision making process and evaluation techniques of natural resources, taxation and the profession's role in environmental issues. Prerequisite: ACCT 360 and ACCT 351.

ACCT 399 Special Topics in Accounting • 5 Cr.  New

Description starting Summer 2018

Allows specialized or in-depth study of a subject related to data analytics in accounting. This class is designed to prepare students with the necessary tools and skills they need to successfully perform data analytics in the accounting profession.

ACCT 400 Accounting Information Systems • 5 Cr.

Introduces the student to systems analysis and the application of information system concepts to the accounting process. Both manual and automated accounting cycles are studied. System processes, controls, flowcharting and internal controls relevant to each of the major transaction processing cycles for a typical business enterprise are covered. Prerequisite: ACCT 351.

ACCT 420 Auditing • 5 Cr.

Introduction to auditing standards; the legal and ethical environment of the profession. Strong emphasis is given on materiality, audit risk, and audit reports. It covers the concepts for application of the audit process to multiple business cycles, internal controls, and to an audit of financial statements by using work papers, sampling, and audit tests and procedures. Prerequisite: ACCT 400.

ACCT 450 Federal Income Taxation II • 5 Cr.

Advanced approach to principles of federal taxation. The course specifically covers concepts and provisions of federal income taxation in relation to property transactions, partnerships, corporations, trusts and estates. Prerequisite: ACCT 285 and admission to BAS Accounting program.

ACCT 470 Advanced Accounting • 5 Cr.

Accounting theory which covers business combinations, consolidated financial statements, and international transactions and investments. Emphasis is given on mergers and acquisitions, subsidiary investments and transactions, international accounting issues and foreign currency transactions, derivatives and hedging activities. Prerequisite: ACCT 351 and ACCT 360.

ACCT 490 Accounting Capstone I • 5 Cr.

This baccalaureate-level course takes a Directed Learning Project (DLP) approach and provides students with a structured learning experience by completing a major practical project in accounting. Students are going to be mentored through the course by a supervising instructor/accounting professional. This course is intended to enhance professional experience in a specific curriculum-related area of accounting, such as auditing, taxation, fraud, finance, payroll, receivables, payables, governmental and non-profit accounting. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.

ACCT 491 Accounting Capstone II • 5 Cr.

This course is a continuation of ACCT 490. The course is intended to provide students with opportunities for analysis, synthesis, prescription, and application of accounting concepts related to the Directed Learning Project undertaken in ACCT 490, along with case studies pulled from the Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) site for public Corporations. Students will apply critical thinking and decision making skills to these real-world business cases involving complex accounting decisions. Prerequisite: ACCT 490.

ACCTG 199 Individual Studies in Accounting • V1-10 Cr.

No class description found.

ACCTG 295 Seminar in Accounting • 2 Cr.

Studies special problems in accounting and/or training of teaching assistants for ACCT& 201 and ACCT& 202. Couse graded on a Pass/Fail basis. Prerequisite: Permission of Instructor.

ACCTG 296 Seminar in Accounting • 2 Cr.

Studies special problems in accounting and/or training of teaching assistants for ACCT& 202. Course graded on pass/fail basis. Prerequisite: ACCT& 201 and permission of instructor.

ACCTG 297 Seminar in Accounting • 2 Cr.

Studies special problems in accounting and/or training of teaching assistants for ACCT& 202. Course graded on pass/fail basis. Prerequisite: ACCT& 201 and permission of instructor.

ACCTG 299 Individual Studies in Accounting • V1-10 Cr.

No class description found.

ADFIT 010 Adult Fitness Development I • 0 Cr.

No class description found.

ADFIT 020 Adult Fitness Development II • 0 Cr.

No class description found.

AHE 100 Introduction to Healthcare • 5 Cr.

An introduction to health care delivery systems, associated career opportunities, and related trends. Looks at the industry as a whole and the integration of services and professions. Students explore career choices including educational requirements, job outlooks, governing agencies, occupational requirements, pay ranges, professional requirements, and employer expectations. Previously HPRO 100. Either HPRO 100 or AHE 100 may be taken for credit, but not both.

AHE 110 Medical Terminology • 5 Cr.

Provides a comprehensive foundation of basic medical terminology for use in health care careers. Includes Greek and Latin word roots, prefixes, suffixes, combining forms, special endings, plural forms, abbreviations and symbols. Terminology emphasis on body structures, anatomical systems, pathologies, medical procedures, medical specialties, and common terms and abbreviations used in health care. Introduces concepts and application or reading, writing and interpreting common medical formats such as HPI and SOAP. Previously HPRO 120. Either HPRO 120 or AHE 110 may be taken for credit, but not both.

AHE 120 Safety for Healthcare • 2 Cr.

Provides basic training in CPR, First Aid, HIV/AIDS, and the prevention of workplace violence. Previously HPRO 105 and RADON 107. Either one of HPRO 105 or RADON 107 or AHE 120 may be taken for credit.

AHE 130 Human Systems • 5 Cr.

Introductory course covering basic cellular, tissue, organ and system structure. Presents an overview of the structure and function of human systems. This course does not substitute for BIOL& 241 and/or BIOL& 242. Previously HPRO 125. Either HPRO 125 or AHE 130 may be taken for credit, but not both.

AHE 140 Professional Relationships in Healthcare • 5 Cr.

Includes interpersonal communication with patients, families, and co-workers. Developing communication skills, cultural competencies, and maintaining customer satisfaction in health care settings. Introduces HIPAA compliance in communication. Previously HPRO 130. Either HPRO 130 or AHE 140 may be taken for credit, but not both.

AHE 194 Special Topics in Allied Health • V1-10 Cr.

Allows specialized, supplemental, or in-depth study of Health Sciences and Allied Health topics. Specific topics are announced in the course schedule. Prerequisite: Permission of program director. Previously HPO 194.

AHE 195 Special Topics in Allied Health • V1-10 Cr.

Allows specialized, supplemental, or in-depth study of Health Sciences and Allied Health topics. Specific topics are announced in the course schedule. Prerequisite: Permission of program director. Previously HPRO 195.

AHE 196 Special Topics in Allied Health • V1-10 Cr.

Allows specialized, supplemental, or in-depth study of Health Sciences and Allied Health topics. Specific topics are announced in the course schedule. Prerequisite: Permission of program director. Previously HPRO 196.

AHE 197 Special Topics in Allied Health • V1-10 Cr.

Allows specialized, supplemental, or in-depth study of Health Sciences and Allied Health topics. Specific topics are announced in the course schedule. Prerequisite: Permission of program director. Previously HPRO 197.

AHE 199 Individual Study in Allied Health • V1-10 Cr.

Covers directed readings, special projects and independent study by an individual student. Designed for students to coordinate with an instructor to investigate individual topics of interest in Health Professions. Specific topics of interest to be arranged with instructor. Prerequisite: Permission of program director. Previously HPRO 199.

AHE 294 Special Topics in Allied Health • V1-10 Cr.

Allows specialized, supplemental, or in-depth study of Health Sciences and Allied Health topics. Specific topics are announced in the course schedule. Prerequisite: Permission of program director. Previously HPRO 294.

AHE 295 Special Topics in Allied Health • V1-10 Cr.

Allows specialized, supplemental, or in-depth study of Health Sciences and Allied Health topics. Specific topics are announced in the course schedule. Prerequisite: Permission of program director. Previously HPRO 295.

AHE 296 Special Topics in Allied Health • V1-10 Cr.

Allows specialized, supplemental, or in-depth study of Health Sciences and Allied Health topics. Specific topics are announced in the course schedule. Prerequisite: Permission of program director. Previously HPRO 296.

AHE 297 Special Topics in Allied Health • V1-10 Cr.

Allows specialized, supplemental, or in-depth study of Health Sciences and Allied Health topics. Specific topics are announced in the course schedule. Prerequisite: Permission of program director. Previously HPRO 297.

AHEA 100 Medical Law and Ethics • 3 Cr.

Introductory course in the "practical" application of law and ethics as related to medical issues healthcare employees face on a daily basis. Topics include federal and state legislation, legal liability, HIPAA, confidentiality and release of information, scheduled drugs and DEA regulations, standard-of-care, and an exploration of the legal issues related to ethical considerations of conception, quality-of-life, hospice care, and advance directives. Prerequisite: Placement by assessment into ENGL& 101, or completion of ENGL 092 or 093 with a C or better. Completion of AHE 100 and AHE 110 with a C or better, or permission of instructor. Previously HPRO 131. Either HPRO 131 or AHEA 100 may be taken for credit, but not both.

AHEA 102 Introduction to Medical Administration • 5 Cr.

This course introduces students to basic medical office procedures, including patient scheduling, written and oral communication, telecommunications, medical records management, and daily financial practices. Prerequisite: Placement by assessment into ENGL&101, or completion of ENGL 092 or 093 with a C or better. Completion of AHE 100, AHE 110, and BTS 161 with a C or better or permission of instructor. Previously HPRO 135. Either HPRO 135 or AHEA 102 may be taken for credit, but not both.

AHEA 104 Introduction to Billing and Coding • 5 Cr.

Introduces Medical Billing & Coding procedures including insurance coverage, terminology, payment systems, legal and ethical issues, healthcare compliance, and collections, and common coding systems such as ICD and CPT. Prerequisite: Placement by assessment into ENGL& 101, or completion of ENGL 092 or 093 with a C or better. Successful completion of AHE 100, 110, 120, 130, 140, HLTH 145 and BTS 161 with a C or better at BC; or permission of instructor.

AHEA 106 Medical Computer Systems • 5 Cr.

Medical computer applications familiarizes students with electronic health record and financial record software used in the medical office and/or hospital settings. Prerequisite: Placement by assessment into ENGL& 101, or completion of ENGL 092 or 093 with a C or better. Successful completion of AHE 100, 110, 120, 130, 140, HLTH 145 and BTS 161 with a C or better at BC; or permission of instructor.

AHEA 110 Health Unit Coordinator I • 5 Cr.

First in a series of courses that focus on the skills needed to become a Health Unit Coordinator. Includes certification requirements, basic data entry, proper workplace behavior, and basic office procedures. Application of these skills will be done in a lab setting. Prerequisite: Prerequisite: Placement by assessment into ENGL& 101, or completion of ENGL 092 or 093 with a C or better. Successful completion of AHE 100, 110, 120, 130, and 140; HLTH 145; AHEA 100, 102, 104, and 106 with a C or better at BC; or permission of instructor. Previously HPRO 174. Either HPRO 174 or AHEA 110 may be taken for credit, but not both.

AHEA 112 Health Unit Coordinator II • 5 Cr.

The second in a series of courses focusing on skills needed to become a Health Unit Coordinator. Students learn the procedures and skills required for this position in a simulated healthcare environment. Prerequisite: Completion of AHEA 110 with a C or better or permission of the instructor. Previously HPRO 175. Either HPRO 175 or AHEA 112 may be taken for credit, but not both.

AHEA 118 Health Unit Coordinator Practicum • 5 Cr.

Capstone course of the Health Unit Coordinator program allows students an opportunity to apply skills learned in the classroom. Students perform functions required in a nursing unit and are monitored and supervised by an experienced Health Unit Coordinator. Prerequisite: Completion of AHEA 110 and AHEA 112 with a C or better at BC, and permission of the instructor. Previously HPRO 176. Either HPRO 176 or AHEA 118 may be taken for credit, but not both.

AHEA 120 Intermediate Medical Coding • 5 Cr.

Students gain an intermediate knowledge and application of medical coding including ICD-9, ICD-10, CPT, HCPCS, and hospital coding systems. Prerequisite: Placement by assessment into ENGL&101, or completion of 3, with a C or better. Successful completion of AHEA 104 and AHEA 106 with a C or better at BC, or permission of instructor.

AHEA 122 Intermediate Medical Billing • 5 Cr.

Students gain an intermediate knowledge of medical billing and reimbursement procedures including insurance coverage, terminology, payment systems, legal and ethical issues, healthcare compliance, and collections. Prerequisite: Placement by assessment into ENGL&101, or completion of ENGL 092 or 093, with a C or better. Successful completion of AHEA 104 and AHEA 106 with a C or better at BC, or permission of instructor

AHEA 124 Advanced Medical Billing and Coding • 5 Cr.

This course expands on intermediate medical billing & coding procedures by providing the knowledge and skills to assess, evaluate, and trouble shoot these systems. This course will also include some industry certification preparation. Prerequisite: Successful completion of both AHEA 120 and AHEA 122 with a C or better at BC, or permission of the instructor.

AHEE 120 Emergency Department Skills • 3 Cr.

First course of a series of corequisite courses that addresses general patient assessment skills required of Emergency Department Technicians. Prerequisite: Placement by assessment into ENGL&101, or completion of ENGL 092 or 093 with a C or better; and successful completion of AHEL 110 and AHEP 100 with a C or better at BC, or permission of instructor.

AHEE 122 Emergency Department Diagnostics • 3 Cr.

Second course of a series of corequisite courses that addresses general patient diagnostic skills required of Emergency Department Technicians. Prerequisite: Placement by assessment into ENGL&101, or completion of ENGL 092 or 093 with a C or better; and successful completion of AHEL 110 and AHEP 100 with a C or better at BC, or permission of instructor.

AHEE 124 Emergency Department Procedures • 3 Cr.

Third course of a series of corequisite courses that addresses general patient procedural skills required of Emergency Department Technicians. Prerequisite: Placement by assessment into ENGL&101, or completion of ENGL 092 or 093 with a C or better. Successful completion of AHEL 110, AHEP 100, with a C or better at BC or permission of instructor.

AHEE 128 Emergency Department Practicum • 5 Cr.

Provides clinical practice in a hospital emergency room as an Emergency Department Technician. Prerequisite: Successful completion of AHEE 120, AHEE 122, and AHEE 124 with a C or better at BC, and permission of the instructor. No more than one quarter between completion of AHEE 120, 122, 124 and enrollment in AHEE 128. Previously HPRO 181. Either HPRO 181 or AHEE 128 may be taken for credit, not both.

AHEL 110 Introduction to Phlebotomy • 5 Cr.

Covers basic responsibilities and skills for phlebotomy. Includes venipuncture techniques and safety with laboratory equipment. Suitable for individuals with limited health care experience interested in venipuncture. Prerequisite: Placement by assessment into ENGL& 101, or completion of ENGL 092 or 093 with a C or better. Completion of AHE 100, 110, 120, 130, 140 and HLTH 145 with a C or better at BC, or instructor permission. Recommended: First 2 of 3 Hepatitis B vaccinations. Previously HPRO 141. Either HPRO 141 or AHEL 110 may be taken for credit, but not both.

AHEL 112 Advanced Phlebotomy • 5 Cr.

Expands on the basic responsibilities and skills for the laboratory phlebotomist. This course is for students pursuing phlebotomy specific credentialing, by providing refinement of and advanced techniques for phlebotomy. Prerequisite: Successful completion of AHEL 110 with a C or better at BC or permission of the instructor. No more than one quarter between completion of AHEL 110 and enrollment in AHEL 112. Recommended: Completion of 2 of 3 Hepatitis B vaccinations.

AHEL 118 Phlebotomy Practicum • 5 Cr.

Provides practical experience in the role of the phlebotomy technician. Prerequisite: Completion of both AHEL 110 and AHEL 112 at BC with a C or better and permission of instructor, with no more than one quarter between completion of AHEL 112 and enrollment in AHEL 118. Previously HPRO 144. Either HPRO 144 or AHEL 118 may be taken for credit, but not both.

Description starting Summer 2018

Provides practical experience in the role of the phlebotomy technician. Prerequisite: Completion of both AHEL 110 and AHEL 112 at BC with a C or better and permission of instructor, with no more than one quarter between completion of AHEL 112 and enrollment in AHEL 118. Previously HPRO 144. Either HPRO 144 or AHEL 118 may be taken for credit, but not both. Grading: Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory.

AHEL 120 Introduction to Clinical Laboratory • 5 Cr.

First in a series designed to prepare students to work in a clinical laboratory setting. Provides overview of clinical laboratory work including organizational structures; regulatory standards; quality assurance practices; and basic clinical laboratory procedures. Prerequisite: Placement by assessment into ENGL& 101, or completion of ENGL 092 or 093 with a C or better. Completion of AHE 100, 110, 120, 130, 140; HLTH 145; and AHEL 110 with a C or better at BC, or permission of instructor. Previously HPRO 146. Either HPRO 146 or AHEL 120 may be taken for credit, but not both.

AHEL 122 Advanced Clinical Laboratory • 5 Cr.

Second course in a series designed to prepare students to work in a clinical laboratory setting. Provides expanded laboratory focused work including regulatory standards; quality assurance practices; and advanced clinical laboratory procedures. Prerequisite: Completion of AHEL 120 with a C or better at BC or permission of instructor. Previously HPRO 147. Either HPRO 147 or AHEL 122 may be taken for credit, but not both.

AHEL 128 Clinical Laboratory Practicum • 5 Cr.

Final course in a series designed to prepare students to work in a clinical laboratory setting. Provides experiential application of knowledge and skills gained through prior course work in a professional practicum. Prerequisite: Completion of AHEL 120 and AHEL 122 with a C or better at BC AND permission of instructor. No more than one quarter between completion of AHEL 122 and enrollment in AHEL 128.

Description starting Summer 2018

Final course in a series designed to prepare students to work in a clinical laboratory setting. Provides experiential application of knowledge and skills gained through prior course work in a professional practicum. Prerequisite: Completion of AHEL 120 and AHEL 122 with a C or better at BC AND permission of instructor. No more than one quarter between completion of AHEL 122 and enrollment in AHEL 128. Grading: Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory.

AHEM 120 Clinical Medicine • 3 Cr.

This is the first in a cohort of courses focused on Medical Assistant skills. The course covers the basic knowledge and skills to assist with rooming patients in the clinical setting, including History & Physical, Vital Signs and patient preparation for the provider consult. Prerequisite: Placement by assessment into ENGL&101, or completion of ENGL 092 or 093 with a C or better. Successful completion of AHEL 110, 120; AHEP 100, 101 with a C or better at BC or permission of instructor.

AHEM 122 Clinical Procedures • 3 Cr.

This is the second in a series of courses covering Medical Assistant skills. The focus is on clinical procedures, preparation and set up, sterile fields, instrument handing and sterilizing, procedure follow up and education. Prerequisite: Concurrent enrollment in AHEM 120 or permission of instructor.

AHEM 124 Diagnostic Medicine • 3 Cr.

This is the third in a series of courses on Medical Assistant skills. The focus is on diagnostic testing in the clinical setting including CLIA-waived Point-of-care testing, ECG, Spirometry. Prerequisite: Concurrent enrollment in AHEM 120 or permission of instructor.

AHEM 128 Medical Assistant Practicum • 5 Cr.

Provides knowledge and skill practice in a clinical medical environment room as a student Medical Assistant. Prerequisite: Successful completion of AHEM 120, 122, 124 with a C or better at BC, and permission of the instructor. No more than one quarter between completion of AHEM 120, 122, 124 and enrollment in this course.

Description starting Summer 2018

Provides knowledge and skill practice in a clinical medical environment room as a student Medical Assistant. Prerequisite: Successful completion of AHEM 120, 122, 124 with a C or better at BC, and permission of the instructor. No more than one quarter between completion of AHEM 120, 122, 124 and enrollment in this course. Grading: Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory.

AHEP 100 Introduction to Pharmacology • 3 Cr.

Introduction to the study of drugs. How drugs affect the body and how the body affects drugs. Includes controlled and uncontrolled drug classification, generic and brand name medications, and the government agency that monitors the production and usage of drugs. Prerequisite: Placement by assessment into ENGL&101, or completion of ENGL 092 or 093 with a C or better. Successful completion of AHE 100, 110, 120, 130, 140; HLTH 145 with a C or better at BC or permission of instructor. Previously HPRO 134. Either HPRO 134 or AHEP 100 may be taken for credit, but not both.

AHEP 101 Medical Administration and Calculation • 3 Cr.

This course introduces the practical application of administering medications to patients. The course covers both enteral and parenteral administration of medications including topical, oral, rectal, intramuscular, subcutaneous, intradermal, and intravascular. Prerequisite: Successful completion of, or concurrent enrollment in AHEP 100, or permission of the instructor.

ALDAC 094 Special Topics in Alcohol and Drug Counseling • V1-5 Cr.

Covers supplementary or unusual classes related to the field. Topics are announced in the class schedule.

ALDAC 095 Special Topics in Alcohol and Drug Counseling • V1-5 Cr.

Covers supplementary or unusual classes related to the field. Topics are announced in the class schedule.

ALDAC 096 Special Topics in Alcohol and Drug Counseling • V1-5 Cr.

Covers supplementary or unusual classes related to the field. Topics are announced in the class schedule.

ALDAC 097 Special Topics in Alcohol and Drug Counseling • V1-5 Cr.

Covers supplementary or unusual classes related to the field. Topics are announced in the class schedule.

ALDAC 100 Professional Development in Addiction Counseling • 1 Cr.

Introduction to the field of addiction counseling and treatment. Overview of state mandated education requirements, certification processes for CDP/CDPT licenses and methods for documenting CDPT work experience hours.

ALDAC 102 Chemical Dependency Pharm of Alcohol and Drugs • 3 Cr.

Examines the physiological and psychological effects of alcohol and other psychoactive drugs including various categories of psychoactive substances and their absorption, ingestion, metabolism, acute intoxication, withdrawal symptomatology, and short and long term effects on severity of addiction and process of recovery.

ALDAC 103 Introduction to Counseling Helping Profession • 3 Cr.

Introduces basic theories, models and techniques used in the counseling professions. Includes interviews with current counseling professionals, hands on practice with counseling techniques and transference, counter-transference self-awareness inventories.

ALDAC 104 Prior Learning Portfolio Development Seminar • 1 Cr.

Alcohol and Drug Studies students explore learning theory, document non-traditional learning and life experiences for evaluation as college level learning. Students pay per credit fee for all academic credits awarded in addition to the cost of the seminar. Prerequisite: Permission of the program director.

ALDAC 105 Chemical Dependency Client and Family Education • 3 Cr.

Explores effects of substance use, abuse and dependence on families and family dynamics. Includes review of community resources and content for educating family members of alcohol and drug addicted individuals. Prerequisite: Permission of program director.

ALDAC 106 Chemical Dependency Individual Counseling • 3 Cr.

Introduces counseling theory and techniques for working with alcoholic and drug addicted individuals with emphasis on motivation to change. Includes practice and development of chemical dependency counseling techniques and strategies. Prerequisite: ALDAC 100, 102, 103, and HSSA& 101 and permission of program director.

ALDAC 108 Chemical Dependency Case Management • 3 Cr.

Introduces mandated requirements for case management responsibilities including patient record management for alcoholic and drug addicted individuals. Prerequisite: ALDAC 100, 102, 103, HSSA& 101 and permission of program director.

ALDAC 125 Chemical Dependency Assessment and Diagnosis • 2 Cr.

Provides diagnostic skills required to accurately assess an individual's use, abuse or dependence on psychoactive substances. Includes assessment standards for evaluating severity of substance dependence on life functioning and patient placement in the continuum of care. Prerequisite: ALDAC 100, 102, 103, and HSSA& 101 and permission of program director.

ALDAC 150 Chemical Dependency Relapse Prevention • 3 Cr.

Addresses processes, behaviors and circumstances related to relapse and recovery with chemically dependent patients. Prerequisite: ALDAC 102, and HSSA& 101 and permission of program director.

ALDAC 160 Chem Dependency Culturally Competent Counseling • 2 Cr.

Introduces the multicultural counseling competencies needed to meet the diverse needs of alcoholic and drug addicted individuals. Includes exercises in self-awareness about diverse communities and barriers to effective addiction treatment.

ALDAC 175 Suicide Assessment, Management and Prevention • 1 Cr.

Participants will learn suicide risk assessment/risk screening, suicide prevention treatment and suicide management. This workshop will also highlight the unique considerations on the topics of bullying, LGBTQ populations, and victims of violence and their risk to suicide. This workshop meets the 6 hour suicide training requirement for professionals certified or licensed in the state of Washington.

ALDAC 194 Special Topics in Alcohol and Drug Counseling • V1-6 Cr.

Allows specialized or in-depth study of subjects supplementing the alcohol and drug studies curriculum. Topics are announced in the class schedule.

ALDAC 195 Special Topics in Alcohol and Drug Counseling • V1-6 Cr.

Allows specialized or in-depth study of subjects supplementing the alcohol and drug studies curriculum. Topics are announced in the class schedule.

ALDAC 196 Special Topics in Alcohol and Drug Counseling • V1-6 Cr.

Allows specialized or in-depth study of subjects supplementing the alcohol and drug studies curriculum. Topics are announced in the class schedule.

ALDAC 197 Special Topics in Alcohol and Drug Counseling • V1-6 Cr.

Allows specialized or in-depth study of subjects supplementing the alcohol and drug studies curriculum. Topics are announced in the class schedule.

ALDAC 198 Seminar in Alcohol and Drug Counseling • V1-3 Cr.

Includes seminars and workshops for which college credit is offered. Topics are announced in the class schedule.

ALDAC 199 Individual Studies in Alcohol and Drug Counsel • V1-6 Cr.

Covers directed readings, special projects, and independent study by an individual student. May be repeated for a maximum of 15 credits. Prerequisite: Permission of program director.

ALDAC 204 Chem Dep Adolescent Assessment and Treatment • 2 Cr.

Examines the similarities and differences between adolescent and adult onset of addiction, various treatment models and developmental delay. Includes practice with adolescent specific diagnostic and patient placement criteria. Prerequisite: ALDAC 102 and HSSA& 101 and permission of program chair.

ALDAC 206 Chemical Dependency Group Counseling • 3 Cr.

Examines psycho-educational dynamics, models, techniques and theories of group counseling with alcoholic and drug addicted individuals. Includes practice and development of group counseling skills. Prerequisite: ALDAC 106 and permission of program director.

ALDAC 207 Chem Dependency HIV AIDS Brief Risk Intervention • 1 Cr.

Provides education on the pathology, intervention and treatment of HIV AIDS and other blood borne pathogens required for chemical dependency professional trainee and certification requirements to be a chemical dependency professional.

ALDAC 220 Chemical Dependency Clinical Practicum • 3 Cr.

Provides opportunity for one on one counseling, group counseling and case management services in a DBHR certified chemical dependency treatment program with qualified supervision. Prerequisite: ALDAC 106, 108, 204, and 206 and permission of program director.

ALDAC 225 Chemical Dependency Ethics and Laws • 3 Cr.

Provides up to date understanding of state and federal statutes, state regulations and code of ethics specific to the field of alcohol and drug counseling and the provision of chemical dependency treatment services in Washington State. Prerequisite: ALDAC 106 and 108 and permission of program director.

ALDAC 230 Chem Dependency Family and Couples Counseling • 3 Cr.

Introduces counseling theory and techniques for working with families, couples and significant others affected by alcoholic and drug addicted individuals with emphasis on prevention, crisis management and intervention strategies. Includes practice and development of crisis management and intervention techniques. Prerequisite: ALDAC 100, 102, 103 and HSSA& 101 and permission of program director.

ALDAC 235 Chemical Dependency Human Development • 4 Cr.

Examines application of various theories on human development from fetal epigenesist to geriatrics in addiction treatment. Explores the effects of personal and parental use of psychoactive substances and related environmental stressors on human development patterns.

ALDAC 240 Chemical Dependency Psychopathology • 4 Cr.

Examines the interaction of substance abuse and dependence with co-occurring psychological disorders. Explores the biological psychological and social influences on the use and abuse of substances, theories of addiction, and common myths and realities of alcoholism and drug addiction.

ALDAC 250 CD: Services, Profesionalism and Self-Care • 3 Cr.  New

Description starting Summer 2018

This class is designed to provide a forum for comprehensive demonstrations of knowledge, skills and attitudes of professional practice in the field of addiction treatment. Students will complete an all-inclusive review and demonstration of the principles and philosophies learned in the Alcohol/Drug Counseling Program in preparation for careers as Chemical Dependency Professionals. Recommended: ALDAC 105. Prerequisites: ALDAC 206, ALDAC 225, ALDAC 230.

ALDAC 294 Special Topics in Alcohol and Drug Counseling • V1-6 Cr.

Allows specialized or in-depth study of subjects supplementing the alcohol and drug studies curriculum. Topics are announced in the class schedule.

ALDAC 295 Special Topics in Alcohol and Drug Counseling • V1-6 Cr.

Allows specialized or in-depth study of subjects supplementing the alcohol and drug studies curriculum. Topics are announced in the class schedule.

ALDAC 296 Special Topics in Alcohol and Drug Counseling • V1-6 Cr.

Allows specialized or in-depth study of subjects supplementing the alcohol and drug studies curriculum. Topics are announced in the class schedule.

ALDAC 297 Special Topics in Alcohol and Drug Counseling • V1-6 Cr.

Allows specialized or in-depth study of subjects supplementing the alcohol and drug studies curriculum. Topics are announced in the class schedule.

ALDAC 298 Seminar in Alcohol and Drug Counseling • V1-3 Cr.

Includes seminars and workshops for which college credit is offered. Topics are announced in the class schedule.

ALDAC 299 Individual Studies in Alcohol and Drug Counsel • V1-3 Cr.

Covers directed readings, special projects, and independent study by an individual student. May be repeated for a maximum of 15 credits. Prerequisite: Permission of program director.

ANTH& 100 Survey of Anthropology • 5 Cr.

An introductory course on the cultures and biology of humans, from scientific and humanistic perspectives. Explores all four fields of anthropology: archaeology (ancient cultures), cultural anthropology (contemporary cultures and cultural diversity), biological anthropology (primates, genetics, evolution, and human biological diversity), and linguistics (language and communication).

ANTH 101 Introduction to North American Archaeology • 5 Cr.

An introduction to the archaeology and environments of North America. Journey back in time and across the continent to learn how native peoples adapted and lived their daily lives. A consideration of prehistory from a global perspective is addressed, as well as the plight of modern descendants.

ANTH 102 Intro Mexican and Central American Archaeology • 5 Cr.

Journey through time to the spectacular prehistoric ruins of the Aztec, Maya, and many other native cultures of Mexico and Central America. Discover how ancient inhabitants dealt with earthquakes, volcanic eruptions, droughts, and other environmental challenges. Connections to contemporary populations are addressed and the place of prehistoric Mesoamerica in global history is considered.

ANTH 103 Introduction to South American Archaeology • 5 Cr.

The vast continent of South America was the home for numerous prehistoric adaptations in diverse landscapes. Explore the magnificent ruins of the Inca, Moche, Nazca, Wari, and ancient peoples of the Amazon Basin. South American archaeology in global context is addressed, as well as the plight of modern descendants.

ANTH 104 Great Discoveries in Archaeology • 5 Cr.

Covers how ancient remains are recovered, the politics of 'discovering' such remains, and what these remains mean within a scientific framework. A critical evaluation of world famous sites (such as the cave paintings at Lascaux, Old Kingdom Egyptian Pyramids, Great Zimbabwe, Machu Picchu, Classic Maya site of Copán, Ozette in Washington state, and more) will highlight key factors, such as racism and sexism, that influence interpretation of the past. An awareness of legal responsibilities facing world citizens and their collective past will be increased. A large visual component will illustrate salient points of the course.

ANTH 107 Great Discoveries in World Archaeology • 5 Cr.

Exploration of some of the most well-known archaeological discoveries from the distant and recent past (such as Olduvai Gorge, Ice Age Caves, Jericho, Egyptian pyramids, Harappa, Stonehenge, Xianyang, Teotihuacan, Cahokia, Mesa Verde, Great Zimbabwe, Chichén Itzá, Machu Picchu, Ozette, etc). Offers global coverage and scientific interpretation incorporating a large visual component.

ANTH 108 Food, Drink and Culture • 5 Cr.

Embark on an eating and drinking adventure and discover the roots of your cuisine. A cross-cultural and global view of food and drink that examines these essentials of life from the cultural, biological, archaeological and linguistic perspectives of anthropology. The phrase "You are what you eat (and drink)" takes on new and profound meanings. Previously ANTH 214.

ANTH& 125 Human Variation • 5 Cr.

Examines the biological basis for population human variation, as well as cultural diversity in the interpretations of these differences. Examine contemporary populations and their distribution of body form, features, skeletal structures and skin color. As well as the cultural, ecological and evolutionary forces that shape human diversity and behavior.

ANTH 180 American Life & Culture • 5 Cr.

A view of American culture from the broad lens of anthropology. Topics include American popular culture, the historical background to American social and cultural values, and the effect of economic and political changes in American life. Situates American culture and society in the context of a globalized world. Same as CES 180. Either ANTH 180 or CES 180 may be taken for credit, not both.

ANTH 194 Special Topics in Anthropology • V1-10 Cr.

Covers supplementary or unusual classes related to the field. Topics are announced in the class schedule.

ANTH 195 Special Topics in Anthropology • V1-10 Cr.

Covers supplementary or unusual classes related to the field. Topics are announced in the class schedule.

ANTH 196 Special Topics in Anthropology • V1-10 Cr.

Covers supplementary or unusual classes related to the field. Topics are announced in the class schedule.

ANTH 197 Special Topics in Anthropology • V1-10 Cr.

Covers supplementary or unusual classes related to the field. Topics are announced in the class schedule.

ANTH 198 Seminar in Anthropology • V1-10 Cr.

Includes seminars, workshops, etc., for which college credit is offered.

ANTH 199 Individual Studies in Anthropology • V1-10 Cr.

Covers directed readings, special projects, and independent study by an individual student. May be repeated for a maximum of 15 credits. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.

ANTH& 204 Archaeology • 5 Cr.

Finding and digging sites is just the beginning of unearthing the past. Archaeologists are scientists who specialize in survey and excavation, as well as analysis and interpretation of ancient and historical remains. The methods, techniques, and goals of archaeology are highlighted to provide a basis on which to understand the rich record of the past. Previously ANTH 105.

ANTH& 205 Biological Anthropology • 5 Cr.

An anthropological view of how human biological characteristics arose, our relation to non-human primates, and how we continue to be shaped by evolutionary forces. Major topics include human genetics, adaptation, monkeys, apes and prosimians, fossil evidence for human evolution and the study of biological diversity in contemporary human populations. Either ANTH& 205 or ANTH& 215 may be taken for credit, not both. Note: Fulfills Science course requirement at BC. Previously ANTH 201.

ANTH& 206 Cultural Anthropology • 5 Cr.

Cultural anthropologists are social scientists who learn first-hand about other cultures by living with the people under study. Topics may include social organization, economics, power and politics, race and ethnicity, language and communication, technology, religion and ritual, and sex and gender. Wide geographic coverage provides a basis for global comparisons of cultural similarities and differences between human groups. Previously ANTH 202.

ANTH 208 Language, Culture and Society • 5 Cr.

Explores the role of language in culture and society. Course covers tools for analyzing language, and examines cross-cultural and cross-linguistic variation. There is a focus on cultural and social issues, such as attitudes toward regional and social dialects, correlations between social groupings and language behavior, the influence of language on thought, and the life and death of languages. Note: Fulfills Humanities course requirement at BC. Previously ANTH 200.

ANTH& 215 Bioanthropology w/Lab • 6 Cr.

A hands-on laboratory approach to human biological characteristics, non-human primates, and evolutionary forces. Major topics include human genetics, adaptation, prosimians, monkeys and apes, fossil evidence for human evolution, and the study of biological diversity in contemporary human populations. Either ANTH& 205 or ANTH& 215 may be taken for credit, not both. Note: Fulfills Laboratory Science course requirement at BC. Recommended ANTH& 100.

ANTH 219 Sociolinguistics • 5 Cr.

What can you tell about people from the way they speak? This course investigates the way social factors, such as age, gender and social class, affect the way people talk. The course also addresses how social and political changes can affect the language we use. Fulfills Social Science course requirement at BC.

ANTH 220 Sex, Gender and Culture • 5 Cr.

An evolutionary, comparative, and holistic approach to sex and gender from the theoretical perspective of Anthropology. Explores the concepts of sex and gender through all four sub-fields (cultural anthropology, biological anthropology, archaeology, and linguistics). Readings examine both non-Western and Western cultures, illustrating how ideas about sex and gender vary in different times and cultures. Recommended: ANTH& 100.

ANTH 222 Environment and Culture • 5 Cr.

Investigates human and cultural systems as part of the ecosystem from the dual lenses of cultural ecology and human ecology. Cross-cultural comparisons of indigenous knowledge and cultural adaptations through time. Scientific modeling of social behaviors and long-term environmental modifications. Contemplates current environmental problems and potential solutions. Recommended: ANTH& 100.

ANTH 224 Anthropology of Music • 5 Cr.

Introduction to the academic discipline of ethnomusicology. The class is built around student participation in a field project, in which students will document, analyze and report on selected regional musical cultures. Covers the history, theoretical constructs and terminology of the discipline, and the ethics and methods of field work. Recommended: ANTH& 100.

ANTH 230 Bones, Stones, Fire and Clay • 5 Cr.

Delve into the earliest forms of human technology with this hands-on course that traces the evolution of tools from their earliest origins, millions years ago up to the end of the Stone Age. Students directly engage with materials through a quarter-long project that moves through the progression of tool technologies. Prerequisite: ANTH& 215 or ANTH& 205 prerequisite/co-requisite.

ANTH 232 Film and Culture • 5 Cr.

Documentary films are a popular way to examine real life that often rivals Hollywood. Combining the methods of film-making with the lens of anthropology offers students the perspective of visual anthropology. This field broadens your horizons by analyzing films from around the world and delving into the history, methods, and theories of the industry. Experiential learning through production of documentaries. Recommended: ANTH& 100.

ANTH& 234 Religion & Culture • 5 Cr.

A global introduction to the religions of the world from a broad comparative perspective. Students examine the development and aspects of various religions (indigenous, Islam, Judaism, Buddhism, Hinduism, Christianity, and others). The relationship between religion and the social and cultural context are explored, especially in relation to nationalism, politics, and globalization.

ANTH& 235 Cross-Cultural Medicine • 5 Cr.

Everyone gets sick at some point in their lives, but how this sickness is viewed and treated is a cultural phenomenon. View health, disease, sickness, and healing from a global lens through the consideration of biology, culture, and political and economic systems. Knowledge of the rapidly expanding field of medical anthropology is essential for future health practitioners for competency in dealing with diverse patients. Recommended: ANTH& 100.

ANTH& 236 Forensic Anthropology • 5 Cr.

Popular TV shows highlight forensics, but how accurate are they and what is this field of study? Covers the tools of the experts in analyzing crime scenes and solving mysteries. Numerous methods, including skeletal analysis, recovery of evidence, and body decomposition, all contribute to resolution of medical and legal investigations. Recommended: ANTH& 204 or ANTH& 205. Previously ANTH 207.

ANTH 294 Special Topics in Anthropology • V1-10 Cr.

Covers supplementary or unusual classes related to the field. Topics are announced in the class schedule.

ANTH 295 Special Topics in Anthropology • V1-10 Cr.

Covers supplementary or unusual classes related to the field. Topics are announced in the class schedule.

ANTH 296 Special Topics in Anthropology • V1-10 Cr.

Covers supplementary or unusual classes related to the field. Topics are announced in the class schedule.

ANTH 297 Special Topics in Anthropology • V1-10 Cr.

Covers supplementary or unusual classes related to the field. Topics are announced in the class schedule.

ANTH 298 Seminar in Anthropology • V1-10 Cr.

Includes seminars, workshops, etc., for which college credit is offered.

ANTH 299 Individual Studies in Anthropology • V1-10 Cr.

Covers directed readings, special projects, and independent study by an individual student. May be repeated for a maximum of 15 credits. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.

ARAB 121 Arabic I • 5 Cr.

Continues ARAB 121. Recommended: ARAB 121, one year of High School or permission of instructor.

ARAB 122 Arabic II • 5 Cr.

Continues ARAB 121. Prerequisite: ARAB 121 or permission of instructor.

ARAB 123 Arabic III • 5 Cr.

Continues ARAB 121. Recommended: ARAB 122, two years of High School or permission of instructor.

ARAB 194 Special Topics Arabic • V1-5 Cr.

Allows specialized or in-depth study of subjects related to Arabic language and culture.

ARAB 195 Special Topics Arabic • V1-5 Cr.

Allows specialized or in-depth study of subjects related to Arabic language and culture.

ARAB 196 Special Topics Arabic • V1-5 Cr.

Allows specialized or in-depth study of subjects related to Arabic language and culture.

ARAB 197 Special Topics Arabic • V1-5 Cr.

Allows specialized or in-depth study of subjects related to Arabic language and culture.

ART 101 Modern Architecture and Design • 5 Cr.

Examines the design environment and how its various components interrelate. Students review the fields of architecture, planning, landscape, industrial, and interior design and learn the history of design movements, styles, and noted designers since 1850.

ART 103 American Art and Architecture • 5 Cr.

>Compares five regions of the U.S., emphasizing the cultural diversity that has influenced the art and architecture of each.

ART 105 Art Appreciation • V1-5 Cr.

Illustrates the visual components of art and artistic techniques and briefly surveys art history. Class format includes slide lectures and off-campus assignments at galleries or museums. Suggested for non-art majors.

ART 108 Introduction to Hand and Power Tools • 2 Cr.

Teaches the safe use of hand and power tools in the wood shop. Class format includes lectures, demonstrations, practice, and testing. Class is graded pass/fail.

ART 110 Two-Dimensional Design • 5 Cr.

Introduces the elements and principles of two-dimensional design. Students practice creative problem solving in original design work. Includes six hours of laboratory. Requires additional lab time outside class.

ART 111 Design Color • 5 Cr.

Continues ART 110, with emphasis on color theory. Students analyze environmental color and apply color concepts and paint techniques to their design work. Includes six hours of laboratory. Requires additional lab time outside class. Prerequisite: ART 110.

ART 112 Three-Dimensional Design • 5 Cr.

Introduces use of the third dimension in design. Students work with wood, metal, etc., to create objects using mass, space, time, and light. Requires additional lab time outside class. Recommended: ART 110 and 111.

ART 120 Drawing I • 5 Cr.

Teaches basic visual and drawing skills. Students use charcoal and pencil to draw objects and forms from direct observation in the studio. Includes six hours of laboratory. Requires additional lab time outside class.

ART 121 Drawing II • 5 Cr.

Continues ART 120. Includes drawing the human figure from live models. Students gain skill in expressive drawing using various media. Includes lecture and lab. Requires additional time outside class. Prerequisite: ART 120.

ART 150 Basic Photo I • 5 Cr.

Introduces basic camera handling, developing, printing, and composition with black-and-white film. Students should own a camera with manual exposure control and must supply their own film, and photographic paper. Requires four hours lecture, two hours lab per week.

ART 151 Basic Photo II • 5 Cr.

Teaches advanced techniques in black-and-white photography. Students practice creative seeing, problem solving, and using the zone system. Requires four hours lecture, two hours lab per week. Prerequisite: ART 150.

ART 153 Darkroom Laboratory Techniques • 1 Cr.

Provides darkroom privileges for students not enrolled in a photography class. Students with working knowledge of darkroom processes gain additional practical experience. Course graded pass/fail. May be repeated for a maximum of 3 credits. Prerequisite: ART 150.

ART 154 Introduction to Digital Photography • 5 Cr.

Introduction to digital photography as a means for artistic exploration and expression. From camera basics, to using appropriate hardware and software, to conceptual and aesthetic considerations, students develop a digital workflow. Recommended: Basic computer skills.

ART 194 Special Topics in Art • V1-5 Cr.

Allows specialized or in-depth study of a subject supplementing the art curriculum. Topics are announced in the quarterly schedule. May be repeated for a maximum of 15 credits.

ART 195 Special Topics in Art • V1-5 Cr.

Allows specialized or in-depth study of a subject supplementing the art curriculum. Topics are announced in the quarterly schedule. May be repeated for a maximum of 15 credits.

ART 196 Special Topics in Art • V1-5 Cr.

Allows specialized or in-depth study of a subject supplementing the art curriculum. Topics are announced in the quarterly schedule. May be repeated for a maximum of 15 credits.

ART 197 Special Topics in Art • V1-5 Cr.

Allows specialized or in-depth study of a subject supplementing the art curriculum. Topics are announced in the quarterly schedule. May be repeated for a maximum of 15 credits.

ART 199 Individual Projects in Art • V1-3 Cr.

Allows an individual student to acquire or practice skills beyond the regular curriculum. Students must have appropriate foundation-level skills. May be repeated for a maximum of 9 credits. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.

ART 201 History of Western Art • 5 Cr.

Surveys the history of Western art from prehistoric Europe and the ancient Near East, Greece, Rome, and early Christian through the Middle Ages. Students also learn basic art-historical terms and concepts. Slide lecture format.

ART 202 History of Western Art • 5 Cr.

Surveys European art of the Italian and Northern Renaissance, Baroque period, and early 18th century. Slide lecture format.

ART 203 History of Western Art • 5 Cr.

Surveys European and American art from the late 18th through the 21st century. Slide lecture format.

ART 205 Survey of Non-Western Art • 5 Cr.

An overview of the visual art of Asia (including India, China, and Japan), the Native Americas, Oceania, and Africa. Examines the development of the visual arts of the non-western world within unique cultural traditions as well as within certain cross-cultural contexts. Slide lecture format. Two-off campus field trips required.

ART 206 History of Photography Theory and Criticism • 5 Cr.

Examines the role photography has played reflecting and shaping culture from its emergence in the 19th century to the digital revolution currently underway. Emphasizes what it means to photograph, to be photographed, and to view photographers as part of an audience. Students make a few photographs of their own along the way (some using a cell phone). Recommended: ENGL& 101.

ART 221 Advanced Studio Drawing I • 5 Cr.

Provides studio experience building on objectives learned in the basic drawing courses. Includes six hours of lecture and lab, with additional time required outside class. Prerequisite: ART 111 and 121, and permission of instructor.

ART 222 Advanced Studio Drawing II • 5 Cr.

Continues ART 221. Includes six hours of lecture and lab, with additional time required outside class. Prerequisite: ART 221 and permission of instructor.

ART 225 Introduction to Aesthetics • 5 Cr.

Explores the nature of art and the aesthetic experience. Students analyze the artistic theories and aesthetic principles underlying Eastern and Western art. Format includes several field trips during class time. Same as PHIL 225. Either ART 225 or PHIL 225 may be taken for credit, not both.

ART 230 Beginning Printmaking • 5 Cr.

The purpose of a printmaking course is to present students with an opportunity to further their knowledge of drawing, painting and design beyond what is offered in our beginning classes. The experience of a different media such as printmaking is desirable as it expands students' concepts of how to compose and activate a two dimensional art format as well as understanding graphic technique. Recommended: ART 120.

ART 235 Printmaking II • 5 Cr.

Continuation of Art 245, Watercolor I. Provides students an opportunity to further their knowledge of drawing, painting and design beyond beginning watercolor. Recommended: ART 245.

ART 240 Oil Painting • 5 Cr.

Introduces color theory and techniques for working in oils. Students learn modeling in light and shade composition. Includes six hours of lecture and lab, with additional time required outside class.

ART 242 Advanced Studio:Oil Painting • 5 Cr.

Continues ART 240. Prerequisite: ART 111 and 121 and 240, or permission of instructor.

ART 245 Watercolor I • 5 Cr.

This course presents basic instruction in watercolor painting. Students use watercolor to paint objects and forms from both direct observation and imagination. Students gain skill in techniques unique to the watercolor process. Requires additional lab time outside of class. Recommended: ART 120.

ART 247 Watercolor II • 5 Cr.

Continuation of Art 245, Watercolor I. Provides students an opportunity to further their knowledge of drawing, painting and design beyond beginning watercolor. Recommended: ART 245.

ART 253 Photo III • 5 Cr.

Explores advanced techniques in photography. Students review the history of photography and practice creative solutions to visual problems. Prerequisite: ART 110 and 151.

ART 254 Advanced Digital Imaging • 5 Cr.

Building on knowledge and skills gained in either ART 150 or ART 154. Explores technical, aesthetic, and conceptual considerations that are driving digital imaging in the 21st century. Prerequisite: ART 150 or 154. Basic computer skills and ownership of a DSLR recommended.

ART 256 Art & Technology • 5 Cr.

Studio art class. Provides key concepts and strategies for students to express themselves using the latest technologies. Students, as employees produce projects using current techniques and tools. Course includes skills for being adaptive and developing problem solving skills for tomorrow's workplace. Recommended: Basic computer skills.

ART 260 Basic Ceramics I • 5 Cr.

Introduces basic forming techniques of hand building and surface techniques including under glazes and glazes for earthenware and high-fire clay bodies. Students also get limited time on the wheel.

ART 261 Basic Ceramics II • 5 Cr.

Continues ART 260 with emphasis on wheel throwing techniques and more advanced surface techniques. Prerequisite: ART 260.

ART 280 Sculpture • 5 Cr.

Covers techniques of popular contemporary three-dimensional media, and applies these to individual expressions in three-dimensions. Includes guidance in composition as appropriate to individual expressive needs. Materials include metal (including metal casting), wood, plastics, stone and plaster.

ART 281 Sculpture II • 5 Cr.

Continuation of ART 280, Sculpture, providing further exploration of the may processes, materials, and techniques available to contemporary sculptors. Fulfills an Art concentration requirement. Prerequisite: ART 280.

ART 294 Special Topics in Art • V1-5 Cr.

Allows specialized or in-depth study of a subject supplementing the art curriculum. Topics are announced in the quarterly schedule. May be repeated for a maximum of 15 credits.

ART 295 Special Topics in Art • V1-5 Cr.

Allows specialized or in-depth study of a subject supplementing the art curriculum. Topics are announced in the quarterly schedule. May be repeated for a maximum of 15 credits.

ART 296 Special Topics in Art • V1-5 Cr.

Allows specialized or in-depth study of a subject supplementing the art curriculum. Topics are announced in the quarterly schedule. May be repeated for a maximum of 15 credits.

ART 297 Special Topics in Art • V1-5 Cr.

Allows specialized or in-depth study of a subject supplementing the art curriculum. Topics are announced in the quarterly schedule. May be repeated for a maximum of 15 credits.

ART 299 Individual Projects in Art • V1-3 Cr.

Allows an individual student to acquire or practice skills beyond the regular curriculum. Students must have appropriate foundation-level skills. May be repeated for a maximum of 9 credits. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.

ASL& 121 American Sign Language I • 5 Cr.

Introduces the basic vocabulary and grammar of ASL for the beginning student and reviews the cultural aspects of deafness. Fulfills humanities course requirement at BC.

ASL& 122 American Sign Language II • 5 Cr.

Develops skills for the student with a basic knowledge of ASL. Focus is on the rules of grammar, idioms, vocabulary building, signing, and reading of signs. Fulfills humanities course requirement at BC. Prerequisite: ASL& 121.

ASL& 123 American Sign Language III • 5 Cr.

Continues ASL& 122 (prev ASL 102). Topics include rules and syntax, and use of illustrated techniques to describe signs. Prerequisite: ASL& 122 (prev ASL 102).

ASL 194 Special Topics in American Sign Language • V1-5 Cr.

Allows specialized or in-depth study of subjects related to American Sign Language and deaf culture. Topics are announced in the quarterly class schedule. Prerequisite: Current ASL students.

ASL 195 Special Topics in American Sign Language • V1-5 Cr.

Allows specialized or in-depth study of subjects related to American Sign Language and deaf culture. Topics are announced in the quarterly class schedule. Prerequisite: Current ASL students.

ASL 196 Special Topics in American Sign Language • V1-5 Cr.

Allows specialized or in-depth study of subjects related to American Sign Language and deaf culture. Topics are announced in the quarterly class schedule. Prerequisite: Current ASL students.

ASL 197 Special Topics in American Sign Language • V1-5 Cr.

Allows specialized or in-depth study of subjects related to American Sign Language and deaf culture. Topics are announced in the quarterly class schedule. Prerequisite: Current ASL students.

ASL 199 Individual Studies in American Sign Language • V1-5 Cr.

Covers individual projects in American Sign Language by an individual student. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.

ASL& 221 American Sign Language IV • 5 Cr.

Reviews and expands basic first-year ASL skills. Students increase their understanding of ASL grammar, expand vocabulary, and improve productive and receptive language skills within a cultural context. Prerequisite: ASL& 123 (prev ASL 103) with a C- or better or permission of instructor.

ASL& 222 American Sign Language V • 5 Cr.

Continues ASL& 221 (prev ASL 201). Students increase their understanding of ASL grammar, expand vocabulary, and improve productive and receptive language skills within a cultural context. Prerequisite: ASL& 221 (prev ASL 201) with a C- or better or permission of instructor.

ASL& 223 American Sign Language VI • 5 Cr.

Continues ASL& 222 (prev ASL 202). Students increase their understanding of ASL grammar, expand vocabulary, and engage in refinement of their signing style within a cultural context. Prerequisite: ASL& 221 (prev ASL 201) with a C- or better or permission of instructor.

ASL 299 Individual Studies in American Sign Language • V1-5 Cr.

Covers individual projects in American Sign Language by an individual student. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.

ASMNT 099 GED EXAM (ASSESSMENT) • 0 Cr.

No class description found.

ASMNT 102 COMB ASSESSMENT: MATH,ENGL,INFORMATION,STUDY SKL • 0 Cr.

No class description found.

ASMNT 104 ENGLISH (ONLY) ASSESSMENT FOR NATIVE SPEAKERS • 0 Cr.

No class description found.

ASMNT 105 ENGLISH (ONLY) ASSESSMENT FOR NON-NATIVE SPEAKRS • 0 Cr.

No class description found.

ASMNT 106 MATH (101/105/156) ASSESSMENT FOR NATIVE SPEAKRS • 0 Cr.

No class description found.

ASMNT 107 MATH (101/105/156) ASSESSMENT FOR NON-NATIVE • 0 Cr.

No class description found.

ASMNT 108 MATH (075/090/092/095/099/105/156/120) ASSESSMNT • 0 Cr.

No class description found.

ASMNT 109 IT 101 ASSESSMENT • 0 Cr.

No class description found.

ASTR& 100 Survey of Astronomy • 5 Cr.

Offers a general survey of astronomy, including the moon, planets, solar system, stars, galaxies, and cosmology. Non-mathematical approach. Classes meet in the planetarium. Either ASTR& 100 (prev ASTR 101) or ASTR& 101 (prev ASTR 105) may be taken for credit, not both.

ASTR& 101 Introduction to Astronomy • 6 Cr.

A general, non-math survey of topics in astronomy, including history, solar system, stars, galaxies and cosmology. Includes a weekly lab. Either ASTR& 100 (prev ASTR 101) or ASTR& 101 (ASTR 105) may be taken for credit, not both.

ASTR 194 Special Topics in Astronomy • V1-5 Cr.

Covers supplementary, contemporary, or focused topics related to Astronomy. Topics are announced in the class schedule. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.

ASTR 195 Special Topics in Astronomy • V1-5 Cr.

Covers supplementary, contemporary, or focused topics related to Astronomy. Topics are announced in the class schedule. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.

ASTR 196 Special Topics in Astronomy • V1-5 Cr.

Covers supplementary, contemporary, or focused topics related to Astronomy. Topics are announced in the class schedule. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.

ASTR 197 Special Topics in Astronomy • V1-5 Cr.

Covers supplementary, contemporary, or focused topics related to Astronomy. Topics are announced in the class schedule. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.

ASTR 199 Individual Studies in Astronomy • V1-5 Cr.

Allows for special projects, student research and independent study in Astronomy by an individual student. May be repeated for a maximum of 15 credits. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.

ASTR 201 Selected Topics in Advanced Astronomy • 6 Cr.

Utilizes hands-on laboratory exercises to address selected topics in advanced astronomy. Topics include the use of telescopes and the methods astronomers use to gather data, the solar system, the evolution of stars, relativity and quantum physics, galaxies and cosmology. Nighttime telescope observing will take place weather permitting. Prerequisite: ASTR& 100 (prev ASTR 101) or ASTR& 101 (prev ASTR 105).

ASTR 299 Individual Studies in Astronomy • V1-5 Cr.

Allows for advanced special projects, student research and independent study in Astronomy by an individual student. May be repeated for a maximum of 15 credits. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.

BA 181 Business Honors Seminar I • 2 Cr.

BA 181 is the first course in the Business Honors Guided Pathway cohort sequence. It is designed for first-year students pursuing studies in accounting, management, marketing, business, finance, law, and statistics. Students will study motivation, teamwork, networking, values, career exploration and cultural competency. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. Recommended: Placement into ENGL& 101 and MATH 138 (or higher).

BA 182 Business Honors Seminar II • 2 Cr.

BA 182 is the second course in the Business Honors Guided Pathway cohort sequence. It is designed for first-year students pursuing studies in accounting, management, marketing, business, finance, law, and statistics. Students will study business writing, research tools, leadership, and cultural competency. Prerequisite: BA 181 or permission of instructor.

BA 183 Business Honors Seminar III • 2 Cr.

BA 183 is the third course in the Business Honors Guided Pathway cohort sequence. It is designed for first-year students pursuing studies in accounting, management, marketing, business, finance, law, and statistics. Students will study a variety of analytical tools and the visual display of information, while learning about writing and communicating research in business, teamwork, and cultural competency. Prerequisite: BA 182 or permission of instructor.

BA 199 Individual Studies in Business Administration • V1-10 Cr.

No class description found.

BA 240 Statistical Analysis • 5 Cr.

Surveys techniques used in decision-making and research. Topics include descriptive and inferential statistics, probability, central tendency, variability, normal and t-distributions, hypothesis testing, and regression. Material has applications in business, health care, etc. Prerequisite: MATH 138 or MATH& 141 with a C or better, or entry code.

BA 294 Special Topics in Administration • V1-10 Cr.

Students study advanced, new topics related to developments in the field of administration and management.

BA 295 Special Topics in Administration • V1-10 Cr.

Students study advanced, new topics related to developments in the field of administration and management.

BA 296 Special Topics in Administration • V1-10 Cr.

Students study advanced, new topics related to developments in the field of administration and management.

BA 297 Special Topics in Administration • V1-10 Cr.

Students study advanced, new topics related to developments in the field of administration and management.

BA 299 Individual Studies in Business Administration • V1-10 Cr.

No class description found.

BIOL& 100 Survey of Biology • 6 Cr.

An introduction to biology for the non-science student, emphasizing fundamental life processes and concepts common to all living organisms, with the human example. Emphasis is on biological applications in today's society. Course includes a lab.

BIOL 108 Human Biology • 6 Cr.

Overview of human body functions, including an introduction to some anatomy and physiology, nutrition and exercise and modern medical advances. This course is intended for non-science majors. Course includes a laboratory. Fulfills laboratory science course requirement at BC. Recommended: High School Biology.

BIOL 125 Survey of Human Diseases • 5 Cr.

Examines the pathophysiology, diagnosis and treatment of common and/or emerging human diseases.

BIOL 135 Introduction to Global Health • 5 Cr.

Introduction to the principles of global health, health determinants, health care systems, nutrition, and women's health issues in the world. The course will discuss ways in which to improve global health and connect how global health challenges can affect local health issues.

BIOL 145 Understanding Cancer • 5 Cr.

This course will cover the causes, detection, treatment and prevention of the major types of cancer, including the hallmarks of cancer as well as the fundamentals of the cell and molecular events that lead to cancer. Recommended: some Biology courses taken prior to this course.

BIOL 150 Marine Biology • 6 Cr.

Introduction to marine life, marine biological communities, and marine ecology. Course includes lecture, labs, and field trips. Fulfills laboratory science course requirement at BC.

BIOL 159 Foundations in Biology • 1 Cr.

This course provides additional support for students in BIOL& 160. Course content will include critical thinking skills, exam preparation (including predicting test questions), self-assessment, cohort building and mentoring. Students will explore learning strategies and identify campus resources supporting the BIOL&160 curriculum. Mandatory participation with S/U grading. Offered quarterly.

BIOL& 160 General Biology w/Lab • 6 Cr.

Introduces major concepts of cell biology, including cell physiology and structure, molecular biology, genetics, and evolution. Course is a prerequisite for professional health-science programs. Format includes laboratory work. Fulfills laboratory science course requirement at BC. Strongly recommended: CHEM& 121, Chem& 140 or one year of high school chemistry.

BIOL 162 General Biology II • 6 Cr.

Surveys systems and processes, and diversity of living organisms and their environment. Format includes laboratory work.

BIOL 194 Special Topics in Biology • V1-5 Cr.

Covers supplementary, contemporary, or focused topics related to Biology. Topics are announced in the class schedule. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.

BIOL 195 Special Topics in Biology • V1-5 Cr.

Covers supplementary, contemporary, or focused topics related to Biology. Topics are announced in the class schedule. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.

BIOL 196 Special Topics in Biology • V1-5 Cr.

Covers supplementary, contemporary, or focused topics related to Biology. Topics are announced in the class schedule. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.

BIOL 197 Special Topics in Biology • V1-5 Cr.

Covers supplementary, contemporary, or focused topics related to Biology. Topics are announced in the class schedule. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.

BIOL 199 Individual Studies in Biology • V1-5 Cr.

Allow students to investigate special biological phenomena and taxa. May be repeated for a maximum of 15 credits. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.

BIOL& 211 Biology Majors Cellular • 6 Cr.

First in a three-course sequence for science majors and pre-professional students. Topics include cell structure, metabolism and energetics, genetic control of life, biotechnology, and an introduction to evolution. Prerequisite: BIOL& 160 and CHEM& 161 with a C (2.0) or better.

BIOL& 212 Biology Majors Animal • 6 Cr.

Second in a three-course sequence for science majors and pre-professional students. Topics include evolution of species, embryonic development of animals, vertebrate systems, and animal taxonomy. Prerequisite: BIOL& 211 (prev BIOL 201).

BIOL& 213 Biology Majors Plant • 6 Cr.

Third in a three-course sequence for science majors and pre-professional students. Topics include plant anatomy, physiology, evolution, and ecology. Prerequisite: BIOL& 211.

BIOL& 241 Human Anatomy and Physiology I • 6 Cr.

Introduces the structure and function of tissues, organs, and systems of the human body. Both BIOL& 241 and BIOL& 242 are needed for a complete study of the anatomy and physiology of all human systems. Format includes laboratory work. Prerequisite: BIOL& 160 or BIOL& 211 with a C or better.

BIOL& 242 Human Anatomy and Physiology II • 6 Cr.

Continues the study of tissues, organs, and systems of the human body. Both BIOL& 241 and BIOL& 242 are needed for a complete study of the anatomy and physiology of all human systems. Format includes laboratory work. Fulfills a laboratory science course requirement at BC. Prerequisite: BIOL& 241 at BC with a C or better.

BIOL& 260 Microbiology • 6 Cr.

Explores structure, function, and taxonomy of microbes, including bacteria and viruses, and their relationships to health and disease. Format includes substantial laboratory work and written reporting. Prerequisite: BIOL& 160 or BIOL& 211 with a C or better.

BIOL 275 Laboratory Methods in Genomics • 6 Cr.

Introduces the use of laboratory tools and techniques to sequence DNA. Topics covered include DNA structures and gene expression. Emphasis on experimental methods and design. Students learn to think critically about research methodology and scientific investigation. Prerequisite: BIOL& 160 or BIOL& 211 or permission of instructor.

BIOL 276 Advanced Laboratory Methods in Genomics • 6 Cr.

Provides experience in teaching and advanced laboratory techniques in genomics. Topics include genomic library maintenance and DNA sequence database maintenance. Emphasis on independent work and teaching other students, critical thinking about research methodology and scientific investigation. Prerequisite: BIOL 275 with a C- or better or permission of instructor.

BIOL 294 Special Topics in Biology • V1-10 Cr.

Covers supplementary, contemporary, or focused topics related to Biology. Topics are announced in the class schedule. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.

BIOL 295 Special Topics in Biology • V1-10 Cr.

Covers supplementary, contemporary, or focused topics related to Biology. Topics are announced in the class schedule. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.

BIOL 296 Special Topics in Biology • V1-10 Cr.

Covers supplementary, contemporary, or focused topics related to Biology. Topics are announced in the class schedule. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.

BIOL 297 Special Topics in Biology • V1-10 Cr.

Covers supplementary, contemporary, or focused topics related to Biology. Topics are announced in the class schedule. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.

BIOL 299 Individual Studies in Biology • V1-5 Cr.

Allows for advanced special projects, student research and independent study in Biology by an individual student. May be repeated for a maximum of 15 credits. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.

BIOL 312 Biology of Cancer • 5 Cr.

Emphasis is on the cellular, genetic, biochemical and environmental aspects of the disease including discussion of the multiple disease nature of cancer, its diagnosis and treatment. Same as RAIT 312. Either BIOL 312 or RAIT 312 may be taken for credit, not both. Prerequisite: Admission into applied baccalaureate program at HSEWI division, or permission of the Life Sciences Program Chair. Recommended: BIOL& 160 or BIOL& 211.

BOTAN 110 Introductory Plant Biology • 6 Cr.

Presents basic concepts of plant biology for the non-major, focusing on the plant characteristics, unity and diversity, growth, and reproduction. Students discuss current ideas in agriculture, horticulture, medicine, biotechnology, ecology, conservation, and environmental issues. Laboratory work includes greenhouse and field studies.

BOTAN 113 Plant Identification and Classification • 6 Cr.

Covers the nomenclature, classification, field study, and laboratory identification of common plant families, with emphasis on the conspicuous flora of Western and Central Washington. Format includes fieldwork, including two full-day trips to Central Washington.

BOTAN 120 Introduction to Mycology • 6 Cr.

Surveys the study of fungi, emphasizing interrelationships with the plant and animal kingdoms. Topics include classification and naming, reproduction, fungi as pathogens of plants, mycotoxins, medicinal and/or shamanistic uses, edible mushrooms, fungal diseases, plant/fungus symbiotic relationships, and pest management.

BOTAN 199 Individual Studies in Botany • V1-5 Cr.

Allows for special projects, student research and independent study in Botany by an individual student. May be repeated for a maximum of 15 credits. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.

BTS 100 Intro To Competency Based Learning • 1 Cr.

Introduces students to the tools, best practices, learning styles, technology and expectations students will encounter in a competency based online course.

BTS 101 Keyboarding I • 1 Cr.

Develops basic skills in keyboarding (touch-typing) and document formatting using the personal computer. No previous computer experience necessary.

BTS 104 Keyboarding Review and Speed Building • 1 Cr.

Increases students' keyboarding speed and accuracy. Prerequisite: BTS 101 or equivalent experience recommended.

BTS 109 Business Communications • 5 Cr.

Strengthens skills for effective professional verbal, written and nonverbal communication. Includes reinforcement of grammar and punctuation, writing and peer-editing, proofreading and revising, business writing strategies, and portfolio preparation. Projects include a presentation with visual tools, outline, citations and portfolio preparation of professionally written business messages.

BTS 110 Web Essentials • 5 Cr.

Introduces internet research, web design tools, web communication and networking websites and tools, browser basics, web search strategies, evaluating and using online resources, writing in HTML, creating effective web pages, and Internet and web security. Projects combine professional writing, computer and web authoring software skills, website creation and design, and presentation skills.

BTS 144 Personal Information Manager • 3 Cr.

Course features the concepts, terminology, and techniques involved in utilizing a popular messaging and personal information management program specifically Microsoft Outlook. Tools and commands are utilized to email, schedule appointments and meetings, create and maintain contact lists, create task lists, maintain journals for recording and tracking activities, and create notes and reminders.

BTS 147 Presentation Design and Delivery • 3 Cr.

Studies business presentation design, delivery and publication using current software and professional standards. Topics include content development, audience analysis, presentation delivery, presentation slides, collaboration tools, integration, security tools, application of template and custom graphics, animation, sound, video and delivery modes. Projects create and deliver professional presentations appropriately organized for the audience.

BTS 161 Business Software Essentials • 5 Cr.

Introduces personal computer and business software in a Windows based environment. Includes file management strategies, personal computing tools, internet navigation, effective business document design, spreadsheet analysis and design and a survey of fundamental software used in a typical business environment. Projects include design and creation of a file management plan, and fundamental interactive spreadsheets. Recommended: BTS 101 or 104 or equivalent keyboarding experience.

BTS 163 Business Document Design Comprehensive • 5 Cr.

Introduces key concepts and software to develop and create business documents. Topics include document design, creation, formatting, layout, output, graphics, tables, citations, mail merge, indexes, macros, forms, and sharing documents. Projects integrate business communication skills and problem solving techniques to create a variety of business documents such as letters, memos, newsletters, flyers, automated documents and collaborative documents.

BTS 165 Business Spreadsheet Analysis & Design • 5 Cr.

Introduces key concepts to develop and analyze business spreadsheets. Topics include formulas, formatting, logical, financial and lookup functions, charts, pivot tables, data tables, and multiple workbooks. Projects integrate skills to create business spreadsheets that communicate financial and operational performance.

BTS 168 Business Data Management Tools • 5 Cr.

Introduces key concepts of data management and the use and creation of relational databases as a business tool. Topics include: views, simple and advanced queries, create and modify forms and sub-forms, reports, primary and foreign keys, importing data, formulas, controls and conditional formatting. Projects apply skills to multiple hands-on databases of increasing complexity.

BTS 173 Windows Basics • 1 Cr.

Introduction to Windows operating system and built-in Windows programs.

BTS 174 Windows File & Disk Management Basics • 1 Cr.

Introduction to the basics of managing, customizing and maintaining files, folders, disks, and display settings using the Windows operating system. Prerequisite: BTS 173.

BTS 186 Publication Design Essentials • 5 Cr.

Introduces key concepts to create and design publications for business use. Studies design principles, publication function, and industry standard software to create, design, and publish business documents, and prepare digital images for print and web use. Projects combine computer software skills design principles and efficient workflow to create business publications such as logos, brochures, advertisements and newsletters. Recommended: BTS 161 or equivalent experience.

BTS 187 Publication Design for Print • 5 Cr.

Explores in-depth the current industry standard software to create and produce professional layouts and multipage publications for print. Topics include design principles, publication function, advertising principles and issues working with clients, typography, print considerations, color management, layout design, and management. Projects integrate design, advertising and client relations skills to create business cards, brochures, posters, directories, books, and banners.

BTS 188 Intro to Digital Content • 5 Cr.

Introduces industry standards in digital imaging software and devices to create, edit, and manipulate images for print and web. Topics include design principles, print and web standards and tools, editing, modifying, compositing, painting, drawing, repairing, color-correcting, and automating digital images for business. Projects include marketing materials such as posters, book covers, labels and ads for use in a final portfolio. Recommended: BTS 161 or BTS 186.

BTS 189 Webpage Authoring Essentials • 5 Cr.

Introduces industry standards in web page authoring and editing tools. Topics include principles of web design, file management, formatting, HTML, CSS, image optimization, publishing and managing dynamic web pages. Projects include the design and publication of a website based on a business client need. Recommended: BTS 110.

BTS 199 Individual Studies Business Technology Systems • V1-10 Cr.

Covers directed readings, special projects, and independent study by an individual student. May be repeated for a maximum of 15 credits. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.

BTS 201 Content Management Systems • 5 Cr.

Explores content management systems (CMS) used to create a web presence. Topics include installation, configuration, designing themes, creating, managing and organizing content, adding plugins, user account management, security and overall CMS site administration. Projects include design and creation of a website using a content management system to meet business/organizational needs. Recommended: BTS 110.

BTS 210 Collaborative Web Spaces • 5 Cr.

Introduces web based collaborative software to enhance work, data and content collaboration in a business environment. Topics include works pace sites, content publication, lists, discussion boards, libraries, surveys, tracking tasks, blogs, wikis, web parts, customization, templates, managing users and permissions. Projects include the design and creation of customized workspaces to solve specific business needs.

BTS 265 Advanced Business Spreadsheet Analysis & Design • 5 Cr.

Develops advanced spreadsheet skills including application programming using software such as Microsoft Excel on the personal computer. Prerequisite: BTS 165.

BTS 268 Advanced Business Data Management Tools • 5 Cr.

Course covers additional user interface features of a relational database. Advanced Wizards are used to create a user interface. Topics include action queries, macros, modules, switchboards, and startup options. Prerequisite: BTS 168.

BTS 280 Project Planning Tracking and Reporting • 5 Cr.

Introduces skills to gather information about responsibilities and resources required to accomplish tasks and calculate the overall cost to plan a project. Studies the software needed to create and modify a project plan. Projects combine software skills with project management principles to plan a project and keep it moving on track in the implementation phase. Recommended: BTS 165 or equivalent experience, and concurrent enrollment in BUS 230.

BTS 289 Emerging Web Development Technologies • 5 Cr.

Expands web development skills to market and sell products and services online. Topics include site design, data management, dynamic content, spry, shopping carts, search engine optimization and web marketing tactics. Projects integrate skills to design, build, and publish an ecommerce web site using current tools, following web marketing best practices and techniques. Prerequisite: BTS 189.

BTS 293 Professional Skills • 5 Cr.

Students apply learning from their respective areas of study to simulate a project environment. They will also work on developing key business skills such as establishing their own professional brand (resume, social media profiles, elevator pitch, letters of recommendation), networking, and creating a portfolio of their professional accomplishments. Emphasis is placed on critical thinking, communication skills, and project management, helping students integrate technical skills into business careers.

BTS 294 Special Topics in Business Technology Systems • V1-5 Cr.

Allows study of advanced or specialized business software applications, supplementing the regular courses.

BTS 295 Special Topics in Business Technology Systems • V1-5 Cr.

Allows study of advanced or specialized business software applications, supplementing the regular courses.

BTS 296 Special Topics in Business Technology Systems • V1-5 Cr.

Allows study of advanced or specialized business software applications, supplementing the regular courses.

BTS 297 Special Topics in Business Technology Systems • V1-5 Cr.

Allows study of advanced or specialized business software applications, supplementing the regular courses.

BTS 389 Ecommerce Development Strategy • 5 Cr.

Expands web development skills to market and sell products and services online. Topics include site design, product management, shopping carts, search engine optimization and web marketing tactics. Projects integrate skills to design, build, and publish an ecommerce web site using current eCommerce platforms and tools, following digital marketing best practices and techniques. Prerequisite: BTS 189 or program chair's permission.

BUS& 101 Introduction to Business • 5 Cr.

Examines the role of business in a modern economy: growth, structure, organization, and relationship to the environment. Students investigate the objectives, functions, and management of business firms. Other topics include problems of organization, decision-making, and controls. Fulfills social science course requirement at BC.

BUS 102 Personal Money Management • 1 Cr.

Part of a series of courses that present core components of personal finance applicable to individuals and financial service workers. Includes cash flow management, personal budgeting, and record keeping. Students develop a personal budget and compile personal income statements. .

BUS 103 Personal Savings • 1 Cr.

Part of a series of courses that present core components of personal finance applicable to individuals and financial service workers. Savings, the banking industry and its products and services, savings returns, and evaluating alternative savings vehicles are covered. Students set financial goals, determine the risks and returns of various savings vehicles, and create a personal net worth statement.

BUS 104 Personal Credit • 1 Cr.

Part of a series of courses that present core components of personal finance applicable to individuals and financial service workers. Focus is on the evaluation of the credit industry and its consumer products and services. Students evaluate alternate credit and loan features and explore strategies for debt management.

BUS 105 Personal Taxes • 1 Cr.

Part of a series of courses that present core components of personal finance applicable to individuals and financial service workers. Focus is on individual tax filing, tax planning and maximizing after-tax returns.

BUS 106 Personal Risk Management • 1 Cr.

Part of a series of courses that present core components of personal finance applicable to individuals and financial service workers. Focus is on the insurance industry and its products. Students evaluate personal insurance needs.

BUS 107 Personal Real Estate • 1 Cr.

Part of a series of courses that present core components of personal finance applicable to individuals and financial service workers. Covers the single-family house and mortgage market. Students review the home buying and mortgage application process.

BUS 108 Personal Investment • 1 Cr.

Part of a series of courses that present core components of personal finance applicable to individuals and financial service workers. Focus is on financial goals, historical risk and returns of major asset classes, asset allocation, maximizing after-tax returns and monitoring investments.

BUS 109 Employee Benefits for Personal Finance • 1 Cr.

Part of a series of courses that present core components of personal finance applicable to individuals and financial service workers. Outlines basic benefits offered by firms. Students become familiar with what these benefits achieve and how to use them for long-term financial planning.

BUS 120 Organizational Behavior • 5 Cr.

Explores the dynamics of human resources in a business organization. Students develop a positive attitude toward the human element in business. Specific topics include motivation, leadership, group dynamics, organization theory, participatory management, and communication.

Description starting Summer 2018

Explores the dynamics of human resources in a business organization. Students develop a positive attitude toward the human element in business. Students assess and challenge their stereotype beliefs to increase objectivity. Specific topics include understanding yourself and others, diversity in organizations, perception and individual decision making, communicating in groups and teams, negotiating power and politics, conflict and negotiation, motivation, leadership, group dynamics, organizational theory, organizational culture, organizational change, participatory management and communication.

BUS 141 Introduction to Insurance • 2 Cr.

Covers the basic background of modern property/casualty insurance systems. Explores the interrelationship of insurance work, how insurance products and services are distributed to the consumer, and how insurance company departments function. Includes civil, tort and contract law and the importance of the risk management process.

BUS 145 Business Mathematics • 5 Cr.

Presents practical mathematics for business and consumer financing. Topics include computing simple and compound interest, present values, annuities, and amortization.

BUS 199 Individual Studies in Business Management • V1-10 Cr.

Covers directed readings, special projects, and independent study by an individual student. May be repeated for a maximum of 15 credits. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.

BUS& 201 Business Law • 5 Cr.

Surveys laws applicable to business transactions. Students focus on law of contract sales, negotiable instruments, and agency. Prerequisite: ENGL 201, ENGL& 235, ENGL 271 or ENGL 272 with a C or better. Recommended: 30 prior college credits.

BUS 203 Business Law II • 5 Cr.

Second course in business law. Extends the study of business law into real property, the Uniform Commercial Code, debtor-creditor relationships, business organizations, cyber law, ethics, and employment. Students extend their learning in the legal reasoning process, legal analysis and writing, and how to communicate clearly. Prerequisite: BA 200 or BUS& 201 or permission of instructor.

BUS 210 Investments • 5 Cr.

Provides tools for personal financial planning and investment selection. Topics include the economy, capital markets, industries, stocks, bonds, international, mutual funds, and other asset classes. Students are required to evaluate and monitor investments, use analytical tools (such as risk return and fundamental analysis), and behavior finance concepts to determine investment selection and fit to personal financial goals and risk profiles.

BUS 219 Business of Film & Video Production • 5 Cr.

Students develop a broad understanding of the Film and Television industries functions and explore ways to gain access to the industry. Students develop the knowledge and understanding to create their own production companies and bring their creative ideas and projects to fruition. Same as MEDIA 219. Either BUS 219 or MEDIA 219 may be taken for credit, not both. Recommended: Video production or film studies coursework.

BUS 221 Human Resource Management • 5 Cr.

Introduces the functional areas of human resource management and laws. Students discuss job analysis, recruitment, testing, interviewing, selection, placement, training, wage and salary administration, performance, evaluation and labor management.

BUS 222 Advanced Leadership & Management • 5 Cr.

Prepares working professionals for effective leadership in a culturally diverse and constantly changing business environment. Prerequisite: BUS& 101 (prev G BUS 101) or BUS 120 or BUS 221.

BUS 223 Applied Principles of Management • 5 Cr.

This course examines foundational concepts of management theory and practices and how to manage people and activities to achieve organizational and ethical goals in an ever-changing diverse environment. Students will explore various aspects of planning, organizing, controlling and leading in the workplace. Current organizational issues and trends will be integrated into the course.

BUS 230 Project Management • 5 Cr.

Examines the theory and practice of project management from a managerial perspective. Students define projects, determine resources requirements, write requests for proposals, outline contract requirements, define and sequence tasks, and create project schedules. Recommended: Concurrent enrollment in BTS 280.

BUS 241 Multicultural Business Consulting • 5 Cr.

Course combines classroom based theory with practicum experience. Students apply skills in marketing, financial analysis, business process analysis, consulting, and multicultural business management in working with a real business or nonprofit. Includes practical experience in consulting and managing in a multicultural environment, and opportunities to link classroom learning to a wide array of business disciplines to see how changes in one area affect the growth of the company as a whole. The same as CES 241. Either CES 241 or BUS 241 may be taken for credit, not both. Recommended: 30 prior college business or marketing credits.

BUS 245 Property and Liability Insurance • 5 Cr.

Includes basic property and liability insurance, contracts, loss exposure, risk management, types of insurers, institution regulations, measurement of financial performance, and operations such as marketing, underwriting, and claims. Prepares students to test for the Certification in General Insurance through the American Institute for CPCU/Insurance Institute of America. Prerequisite: BUS 141 or equivalent experience recommended.

BUS 246 Personal Insurance • 5 Cr.

Designed for those interested in personal insurance needs or majoring in business. Covers personal insurance and financial planning. Includes automobile, homeowners, fire, flood, earthquake, ocean marine, life, health and other personal property and liability insurance. Prepares students for the Certification in General Insurance through the American Institute for CPCU/Insurance Institute of America. Prerequisite: BUS 141 or equivalent experience recommended.

BUS 247 Commercial Insurance • 5 Cr.

Covers insurance for commercial property, business income, equipment breakdown, inland and ocean marine, commercial crime, commercial automobile and general liability, farm, and business owner's policies. Includes workers compensation and employers liability insurance. Prepares students for Certification in General Insurance through the American Institute for CPCU/Insurance Institute of America. Prerequisite: BUS 141 or equivalent experience recommended.

BUS 248 Insurance Codes and Ethics • 2 Cr.

Designed for insurance majors. Addresses ethical behavior and considerations one must support in order to succeed in business, specifically in the insurance industry. Includes the Washington State Code and a series of case studies regarding ethical behavior in the field of insurance. Prerequisite: BUS 141 equivalent experience recommended.

BUS 250 Entrepreneurship • 5 Cr.

Deals with organizing and operating a small business. Topics include development of a business plan, failure factors in small business, source of capital, record keeping, financial statements, taxation, marketing, legal and regulatory issues and management principles. Prerequisite: Completion of 30 business credits or equivalent business experience recommended.

BUS 260 Business Ethics • 5 Cr.

Introduction to ethical theories relevant to issues and problems in business. Explores ethical concerns in marketing, race/gender bias, economics, the natural environment, employee-employer duties, and civic relations. Same as PHIL 260. Either BUS 260 or PHIL 260 may be taken for credit, not both.

BUS 280 Advanced Studies in International Business • 5 Cr.

Focuses on student research projects comparing U.S. business practices with their International counterparts. Class requires participation in the one-week international research trip. Prerequisite: INTST 150 and permission of instructor. INTST 150 may be taken concurrently.

BUS 291 Business Internship I • 2 Cr.

Develops the skills necessary for an effective job search. Topics covered include resumes, cover letters, interviews, job searches, and portfolios. Course is graded credit/no credit. Prerequisite: Entry code. .

BUS 292 Business Internship II • V1-10 Cr.

Continues BUS 291, with students working at least 15 hours weekly in an industry related to their studies. Students meet weekly with instructor and discuss their work activities. Course is graded credit/no credit. Variable credit based on hours worked in internship. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.

BUS 294 Special Topics in Management • V1-10 Cr.

Allows study of advanced or specialized topics in the field of management.

BUS 295 Special Topics in Management • V1-10 Cr.

Allows study of advanced or specialized topics in the field of management.

BUS 296 Special Topics in Management • V1-10 Cr.

Allows study of advanced or specialized topics in the field of management.

BUS 297 Special Topics in Management • V1-10 Cr.

Allows study of advanced or specialized topics in the field of management.

BUS 299 Individual Studies in Business Management • V1-10 Cr.

Covers directed readings, special projects, and independent study by an individual student. May be repeated for a maximum of 15 credits. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.

BUS 342 Management Practices and Processes • 2 Cr.

This course is designed to provide students a basic understanding of the managerial function and processes. Students can apply managerial skills within their areas of responsibility and better understand how their work activities fit into the larger organizational structure and management. Recommended: BUS& 101.

BUS 355 Business of IT: Legal Regulatory Business Env • 5 Cr.

This course focuses on managerial and legal principles and knowledge that are critical to IT organizations and the management of organizations focused on information technology in the modern business world. Students will develop skills and techniques in the areas of the relevant legal concepts and doctrines; regulatory and administrative agency requirements; and organizational development and management practice applicable in the IT environment. Case studies will be used. Prerequisite: BUS& 101.

BUS 370 Intermediate Project Management • 5 Cr.

Examines project management theory and practice, with emphasis on scientific, technical, and medical applications. Uses PMI's PMBOK framework to explain the creation and management of projects in contemporary organizations. Cases and examples illustrate the application of this framework to real-world Waterfall, Iterative, and Agile projects. Prerequisite: Acceptance to BAS program or instructor permission.

BUS 375 Research Methods in Accounting • 5 Cr.  New

Description starting Summer 2018

The course covers utilization of knowledge, skills and abilities of critical approach to accounting research, theories and practice. The course uses a theoretical and conceptual framework to explain the development of the research idea, literature and developing hypotheses as well as research ethics in accounting. The focus of measurement will be on accounting and business research that will prepare students for capstone classes. Prerequisites: Completion of the first year of BAS Accounting and permission of instructor.

BUSIT 103 SQL Fundamentals • 5 Cr.

Students learn the fundamentals of database structure and SQL (Structured Query Language). They learn techniques useful for querying databases and they learn to apply their skills in realistic scenarios extracting data and organizing it into meaningful information. Students gain experience with database servers and client tools. Recommended: Familiarity with spreadsheets or databases.

BUSIT 105 Introduction to Business Intelligence • 5 Cr.

Provides an introduction to Business Intelligence solutions. Introduces the concepts and current methodologies for creating multi-dimensional databases. Students work with current server tools to create and browse multi-dimensional databases of various designs. Students learn to use reporting software and analytical software tools to analyze data and present findings. Prerequisite: BUSIT 103 with a C or better and completion of ENGL& 101 with a C or better.

BUSIT 110 Data Warehouse I • 5 Cr.

Introduces the concepts associated with the development of a data warehouse. Students apply the "Extract, Clean, Conform, and Deliver" process to organizational data and build the dimension and fact tables required in a data warehouse. Current server tools are used in hands-on exercises. Prerequisite: BUSIT 105 with a C- or better.

Description starting Summer 2018

Introduces the concepts associated with the development of a data warehouse. Students apply the "Extract, Clean, Conform, and Deliver" process to organizational data and build the dimension and fact tables required in a data warehouse. Current server tools are used in hands-on exercises. Prerequisite: BUSIT 105 with a C or better.

BUSIT 115 Data Mining I • 5 Cr.

Introduces the computer-assisted process of evaluating enormous sets of data to find previously undiscovered patterns, draw conclusions and then make decisions based on these patterns. Concepts are introduced and hands-on exercises used to apply the concepts using current software tools. Prerequisite: BUSIT 105 with a C- or better.

Description starting Summer 2018

Introduces the computer-assisted process of evaluating enormous sets of data to find previously undiscovered patterns, draw conclusions and then make decisions based on these patterns. Concepts are introduced and hands-on exercises used to apply the concepts using current software tools. Prerequisite: BUSIT 105 with a C or better.

BUSIT 150 Introduction to Business Analysis • 5 Cr.

This course introduces business analysis and business analysis areas of knowledge based upon the International Institute of Business Analysis (IIBA) Guide to the Business Analysis Body of Knowledge. Students learn business analysis terminology and the structure of business analysis tasks. Prerequisite: ENGL& 235, BUS& 101, and CMST 250.

BUSIT 199 Independent Studies in Business Intelligence • V1-5 Cr.

Covers directed readings, special projects, and independent study by an individual student. May be repeated for a maximum of 15 credits. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.

BUSIT 202 Dimensional Modeling • 5 Cr.

Dimensional modeling has been broadly accepted as the principle technique for data warehouse design. Students use a sequenced series of case studies and hands-on exercises to learn effective design principles for data warehouse development. Prerequisite: BUSIT 105 with a C- or better.

BUSIT 205 Multidimensional Analysis • 5 Cr.

Concepts and techniques used in BUSIT 105 are expanded upon to create advanced, business-oriented solutions with multi-dimensional databases. Students learn the MDX language for querying multi-dimensional databases. Prerequisite: BUSIT 105 with a C- or better and PROG 140 with a C- or better.

BUSIT 209 Data Visualization • 5 Cr.

Introduces theory and concepts relating to the effective display of data with a focus on quantitative data. Concepts provide the basis for selecting, designing, and presenting graphs based on multi dimensional data. Current tools are used to graph the correct data, alert decision makers to problems, and display data geographically. Prerequisite: BUSIT 105 with a C- or better.

BUSIT 210 Data Warehouse II • 5 Cr.

Students build on the concepts and techniques learned in BUSIT 110 while focusing on ETL (Extract, Transform and Load) strategies and tools. Current server tools are used in hands-on exercises to help reinforce data warehousing concepts. Prerequisite: BUSIT 110 with a C- or better and PROG 140 with a C- or better.

BUSIT 250 Applying Business Analysis Techniques • 5 Cr.

Students learn specific techniques for various business analysis tasks. They learn to apply these techniques to real world scenarios. Techniques are chosen based upon The International Institute of Business Analysis (IIBA) Guide to the Business Analysis Body of Knowledge and focus is on those techniques most commonly used. Prerequisite: BUSIT 150 Introduction to Business Analysis.

BUSIT 294 Special Topics in Business Intelligence • V1-5 Cr.

Allows specialized or in-depth study of a subject related to business intelligence where the topic is announced in the quarterly schedule. May be repeated for a maximum of 15 credits of different topics.

BUSIT 295 Special Topics in Business Intelligence • V1-5 Cr.

Allows specialized or in-depth study of a subject related to business intelligence where the topic is announced in the quarterly schedule. May be repeated for a maximum of 15 credits of different topics.

BUSIT 296 Special Topics in Business Intelligence • V1-5 Cr.

Allows specialized or in-depth study of a subject related to business intelligence where the topic is announced in the quarterly schedule. May be repeated for a maximum of 15 credits of different topics.

BUSIT 297 Special Topics in Business Intelligence • V1-5 Cr.

Allows specialized or in-depth study of a subject related to business intelligence where the topic is announced in the quarterly schedule. May be repeated for a maximum of 15 credits of different topics.

BUSIT 299 Independent Studies in Business Intelligence • V1-5 Cr.

Covers directed readings, special projects, and independent study by an individual student. May be repeated for a maximum of 15 credits. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.

CELNG 002 CE LANGUAGE CLASS INTERMEDIATE • 1 Cr.

No class description found.

CEO 057 Special Topics in CEO • V1-5 Cr.

Develops skills for success in career and education programs through special topics.

CEO 100 Introduction to College Level Learning • 5 Cr.

General introduction to the cognitive and affective skills needed to succeed in life, education and career: understanding the difference between high school and college expectations to achieve academic success, and development of self-esteem, commitment, responsibility, persistence, respect and positive attitude. Prerequisites: Participant in CEO Program, concurrent enrollment with CEO 101 and 105.

CEO 101 Introduction to College/Career Success • 5 Cr.

An introduction to the attitudes, skills and personal characteristics that contribute to personal, academic, career and life success; the characteristics of positive attitude and self-esteem as an essential factor to personal health and positive relationships; recognizing and eliminating self-defeating behavior. Prerequisites: Concurrent enrollment with CEO 101 and 105, active CEO Program participant.

CEO 102 Survey of Life, Education, and Career Success • 5 Cr.

Development of skills that promote success in education, career and life. Prerequisites: CEO 100, 101, and 105 and active status in CEO Program.

CEO 103 Career Planning • 3 Cr.

Advanced application and implementation of previously-learned skills: leadership, comprehensive career plan, and an intensive scholarship search. Prerequisite: C- or better in CEO 100, 101, 102, 105 and permission of instructor.

CEO 104 Preparing for the Job Market • 2 Cr.

This course will introduce skills and strategies to compete in the job market, general and discipline-specific leadership skills, the career portfolio as a tool in job application, resources for future education, professional development, and lifelong learning. Prerequisite: C- or better in CEO 100, 101, 102, 103, 105, and permission of instructor.

CEO 105 Resources and Technology for College and Career • 5 Cr.

Overview and introduction to BC and community websites, resources and support. Students will assess their keyboarding skills. They will cover the basics of power point, outlook, website navigation, online classes and Excel and their application to college and career success. This class will satisfy the recommended prerequisite for BTS 161 or BTS 110.

CEO 194 Special Topics in Career Education Options • V1-5 Cr.

In-depth study of educational or career topic. Will be announced in quarterly schedule.

CEO 195 Special Topics in Career Education Options • V1-5 Cr.

In-depth study of educational or career topic. Will be announced in quarterly schedule.

CEO 196 Special Topics in Career Education Options • V1-5 Cr.

In-depth study of educational or career topic. Will be announced in quarterly schedule.

CEO 197 Special Topics in Career Education Options • V1-5 Cr.

In-depth study of educational or career topic. Will be announced in quarterly schedule.

CEO 294 Special Topics in Career Education Options • V1-5 Cr.

In-depth study of educational or career topic. Will be announced in quarterly schedule.

CEO 295 Special Topics in Career Education Options • V1-5 Cr.

In-depth study of educational or career topic. Will be announced in quarterly schedule.

CEO 296 Special Topics in Career Education Options • V1-5 Cr.

In-depth study of educational or career topic. Will be announced in quarterly schedule.

CEO 297 Special Topics in Career Education Options • V1-5 Cr.

In-depth study of educational or career topic. Will be announced in quarterly schedule.

CEREL 067 Limited Practice Officer • 0 Cr.

No class description found.

CES 100 Race in the United States • 5 Cr.

Survey of the history of African Americans, Asian Americans, Chicanos, American Indians, and other indigenous peoples as they become part of the United States, or in the whole Americas depending on focus. Fulfills social science or humanities requirement, not both, at BC. Prerequisite: Placement by assessment into ENGL& 101 or ENGL 092 or 093 with a C- or better or entry code. Previously ETHN 100.

CES 101 Introduction to American Myth • V1-5 Cr.

Analyzes the myth of "America" as found in American life and thought, literature, the arts, and the mass media. Students get an overview of the field of American Studies as it relates to other disciplines. Students apply critical thinking skills to their own value systems. Previously AMST 101.

CES 102 Introduction to American Culture • 2 Cr.

Examines central themes of American Studies as they relate to other disciplines. Themes can include The American Dream, Comparative Culture, U.S. and Asia, Immigration in American Life, and others. Previously AMST 102.

CES 103 American Art & Architecture • 5 Cr.

Compares five regions of the U.S., emphasizing the cultural diversity that has influenced the art and architecture of each. Same as ART 103. Either CES 103 or ART 103 may be taken for credit, not both. Previously AMST 103.

CES 104 Introduction to White Culture in United States • 5 Cr.

Studies the history, culture, religion, institutions, politics, economics, arts, and psychology of peoples of white culture as developed from experience in both the old and new worlds. Multidisciplinary analysis of social life looking at white culture in America as a social construct and the consequences of this construct. Fulfills social science or humanities course requirement, not both at BC. Prerequisite: Placement by assessment into ENGL& 101 or ENGL 092 or 093 with a C- or better or entry code. Previously ETHN 102.

CES 106 Introduction to Immigration • 5 Cr.

Are you curious about the state of Immigration or what it means to be an immigrant? Study some of the most important thrusts in Migration Studies and trace its history from a cultural and policy standpoint. Themes may include global impacts, cultural migration and analyses of Immigration in popular culture.

CES 109 Introduction to Women's Studies • 5 Cr.

Feminist analysis of the construction and enforcement of gender differences and gender inequalities in various contexts. Emphasis on the intersection of race, class, sexuality and nationality in the lives of women. Topics include feminist theory, motherhood, popular culture, sexual autonomy, racism, and activism in the United States, with possibilities of exploring these issues in Europe, Asia, the Middle East, Africa, and South and Central America. Recommended: Placement by assessment into ENGL& 101. Previously ETHN 109.

CES 115 American Film as Literature • 5 Cr.

Introduces the critical study of the motion picture as an expressive medium comparable to literary art. Students review the history and cultural traditions of American film, with focus on the feature-length film as a novelistic form. Students analyze film adaptations of American literary texts. Also includes documentaries and other genres. Previously AMST 115.

CES 120 Introduction to Native American Studies • 5 Cr.

Provides an historical and contemporary perspective on the social, political, and cultural issues of the Indigenous Peoples of North America. Students explore Indigenous literature, and the representation of Native peoples in film and television, among other areas. Recommended: ENGL& 101. Previously ETHN 120.

CES 121 Native Americans & Film • 5 Cr.

Provides an historic and contemporary perspective on the representations of Native Americans in cinema. Explores the invention of Natives in Hollywood and the creation of a Native aesthetic. Same as SOC 121. Either CES 121 or SOC 121 may be taken for credit, not both. Recommended: ENGL& 101. Previously ETHN 121.

CES 130 Ethnic Identity of Deafness • 5 Cr.

Leads students to an understanding of Deafness as a cultural identity, through an exploration of Identity Formation, as explained by social scientific theory, and expressed through film, art, literature, poetry and visual music, which reveal the historical and social forces that act upon the lives of Deaf people in the modern world. Prerequisite: Placement by assessment into ENGL& 101 or ENGL 092 or ENGL 093 with a C- or better.

CES 140 Introduction to African American Studies • 5 Cr.

Uses an interdisciplinary, multimedia approach to examine the history, culture, religions, institutions, politics, economics, and arts of peoples of African descent in the United States. Focus is on U.S. life from a Black perspective, examining both historical and contemporary works. Prerequisite: Placement by assessment into ENGL& 101, or ENGL092 or ENGL 093 with a C- or better. Previously ETHN 140.

CES 152 Introduction to Asian American Studies • 5 Cr.

Survey of the history of Asian American ethnicities, evolution of Asian American Cultures in the United States from the 1850's through the present, immigration patterns, evolution of co-cultures, evacuation, inter-ethnic relations. May be used as a social science or humanities course requirement, not both, at BC. Prerequisite: Placement by assessment into ENGL& 101 or ENGL 092 or 093 with a C- or better. Previously ETHN 152.

CES 160 Introduction to American Political Culture • 5 Cr.

Examines the structures and systems of American politics using a multidisciplinary approach. Students analyze the development of political culture and its evolution through time. Same as POLS 160 (prev POLSC 160). Either CES 160 or POLS 160 (prev POLSC 160) may be taken for credit, not both. Previously AMST 160.

CES 170 Introduction to Latino Studies in the U.S. • 5 Cr.

Examines social, cultural and political issues of Latinos in the US past and present. Topics include: Latino cultural and racial identity, social movements, immigration, stereotypes, social stratification and racial inequality.

CES 180 American Life & Culture • 5 Cr.

A view of American culture from the broad lens of anthropology. Topics include American popular culture, the historical background to American social and cultural values, and the effect of economic and political changes in American life. Situates American culture and society in the context of globalized world. Same as ANTH 180. Either CES 180 or ANTH 180 may be taken for credit, not both. Previously AMST 180.

CES 199 Independent Studies in Cultural & Ethnic Studies • V1-5 Cr.

Covers directed readings, special projects and independent study by an individual student. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. Previously ETHN 199.

CES 200 Cultural Pluralism • 5 Cr.

Explores the roles that race, gender, and class differences play in American society. Students examine the impact that racism, sexism, and class conflict has on our lives and our social, economic, and political structures. Previously: AMST 200.

CES 201 Sports and Culture • 5 Cr.

Using the cultural framework of sports and the world around it, students critically analyze related social issues such as race, class, and gender. Multiple perspectives are included. Prerequisite: Placement by assessment into ENGL& 101 or ENGL 092 or 093 with a C- or better. Previously: ETHN 200.

CES 203 Borderlands • 5 Cr.

What goes on in Border Towns? What do you know about Mexico-U.S. Immigration political policy? What about the history of immigration and where you fit in? Study the most current Borderlands studies from all political perspectives in this dynamic class.

CES 205 Cultural Studies • 5 Cr.

What (and who) makes culture in America? Study some of the most important thrusts in Cultural Studies, and trace the history of Cultural Studies as a field. Themes may include the development of cultural studies, high/low brow culture, and analyses of art, film, media, and network societies.

CES 210 Ethnic Experiences in Art & Music • 5 Cr.

Utilizes historical and contemporary sources to survey the art, music and music-related traditions of a specific ethnic or regional group. The type or types of music and art studied will be at the discretion of the instructor. May be used as social science or humanities course requirement, not both, at BC. Prerequisite: Placement by assessment into ENGL& 101 or ENGL 092 or 093 with a C- or better. Previously ETHN 210.

CES 234 Being Mixed Race the US • 5 Cr.

What does it mean to be mixed race? Isn't everyone mixed? Explore what it means to be mixed race in the US. Examine what our society tells us about race and ethnicity and how being mixed challenges those long-held understandings. Themes will include media representations, personal narratives, identity, and many more. May be used as social science course requirement at BC.

CES 241 Multicultural Business Consulting • 5 Cr.

Course combines classroom based theory with practicum experience. Students apply skills in marketing, financial analysis, business process analysis, consulting, and multicultural business management in working with a real business or nonprofit. Includes practical experience in consulting and managing in a multicultural environment, and opportunities to link classroom learning to a wide array of business disciplines to see how changes in one area affect the growth of the company as a whole. The same as BUS 241. Either CES 241 or BUS 241 may be taken for credit, not both. Recommended: 30 prior college business credits.

CES 255 Hawaii the Center of the Pacific • 5 Cr.

Examines Hawaiian culture from pre-Christian Hawaii to the Hawaiian Sovereignty Movement of the 20th Century. Studies the geography, culture and diaspora of selected immigrant cultures and the development of the Hawaiian multicultural society. Also examines the evolving land use and economic patterns of Hawaii. Previously ETHN 255.

CES 257 Queer Studies • 5 Cr.

Explore the social, cross-cultural, and historical issues related to lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and queer-identified peoples in the United States. Using cultural studies, sociology, literature, art, history, and popular culture, we will investigate the relationship between homophobia, heterosexism, heterosexuality and the societal structures that create and perpetuate systems of inequality. May be used to satisfy either Social Science or Humanities credit.

CES 260 Economic Development of the U.S. • 5 Cr.

Analyzes the industrialization and transformation of the U.S. economy from colonial times to the present. Students examine the rapid changes after the Civil War and the Great Depression, as well as the contributions of immigrants and native groups. Same as ECON 260. Either CES 260 or ECON 260 may be taken for credit, not both. Recommended: 30 prior college credits. Previously AMST 260.

CES 281 Issues in Womens Studies • 5 Cr.

An exploration of women's specific issues from a cultural and historical perspective. Topics are announced in the quarterly schedule. Prerequisite: Placement by assessment into ENGL& 101 or ENGL 092 or 093 with a C- or better. Previously ETHN 281.

CES 282 Issues in Womens Studies • 5 Cr.

An exploration of women's specific issues from a cultural and historical perspective. Topics are announced in the quarterly schedule. Prerequisite: Placement by assessment into ENGL& 101 or ENGL 092 or 093 with a C- or better. Previously ETHN 282.

CES 283 Issues in Womens Studies • 5 Cr.

An exploration of women's specific issues from a cultural and historical perspective. Topics are announced in the quarterly schedule. Prerequisite: Placement by assessment into ENGL& 101 or ENGL 092 or 093 with a C- or better. Previously ETHN 283.

CES 284 Issues in Womens Studies • 5 Cr.

An exploration of women's specific issues from a cultural and historical perspective. Topics are announced in the quarterly schedule. Prerequisite. Previously ETHN 284.

CES 285 American Humor • 5 Cr.

Surveys the history of American humor. Topics may include the Down East, Old Southwest, and Literary Comedian genres of the 19th century and the Purple Cow and Columnists humorists of the 20th century. Students may also analyze contemporary forms such as cartoons and stand-up comedy. Previously AMST 285.

Description starting Summer 2018

Surveys the history of American humor. Topics may include the Down East, Old Southwest, and Literary Comedian genres of the 19th century and the Purple Cow and Columnists humorists of the 20th century. Students may also analyze contemporary forms such as cartoons and stand-up comedy and analyze how they have been used to cope with social-cultural inequities. Previously AMST 285.

CES 286 Popular Culture • 5 Cr.

Analyzes various forms of contemporary popular culture and its expression in mass media. Specific topics may include western and romance novels, consumerism, advertising, gender images, folklore, film, and music. Previously AMST 286.

CES 287 American Heroes • 5 Cr.

Investigates the American hero as part of the American dream. Students examine the different ideologies for men and women as well as ethnic minorities. Students take an interdisciplinary approach to analyzing changing heroic values in literature, history, film, art, and music. Previously AMST 287.

CES 288 Frontiers--Land & Space • 5 Cr.

Explores land (wilderness, frontier, city) and space as major symbols in the American myth. Students gain an interdisciplinary perspective on concepts from the "promised land" of Puritan New England to 20th-century space exploration. Previously AMST 288.

CES 294 Special Topics in Cultural and Ethnic Studies • V1-5 Cr.

Allows focused study of a topic supplementing the Cultural and Ethnic Studies curriculum. Student interest and instructor expertise help determine the topic, which is announced in the class schedule. Examples of topics are American Women Artists, Stages of American Life, Modernity in America, and Immigrant Women. Previously AMST 294.

CES 295 Special Topics in Cultural and Ethnic Studies • V1-5 Cr.

Allows focused study of a topic supplementing the Cultural and Ethnic Studies curriculum. Student interest and instructor expertise help determine the topic, which is announced in the class schedule. Examples of topics are American Women Artists, Stages of American Life, Modernity in America, and Immigrant Women. Previously AMST 295.

CES 296 Special Topics in Cultural and Ethnic Studies • V1-5 Cr.

Allows focused study of a topic supplementing the Cultural and Ethnic Studies curriculum. Student interest and instructor expertise help determine the topic, which is announced in the class schedule. Examples of topics are American Women Artists, Stages of American Life, Modernity in America, and Immigrant Women. Previously AMST 296.

CES 297 Special Topics in Cultural and Ethnic Studies • V1-5 Cr.

Allows focused study of a topic supplementing the Cultural and Ethnic Studies curriculum. Student interest and instructor expertise help determine the topic, which is announced in the class schedule. Examples of topics are American Women Artists, Stages of American Life, Modernity in America, and Immigrant Women. Previously AMST 297.

CES 299 Individual Studies in American Studies • V1-5 Cr.

Covers directed reading, special projects, and independent study by an individual student. May be repeated for a maximum of 15 credits. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. Previously AMST 299.

CHEM 100 Chemical Explorations • 5 Cr.

Presents basic concepts of chemistry using a relatively non-mathematical approach. Topics include measurement, atomic and molecular structure, the periodic table, chemical vs. physical changes, acids and bases, and the social and environmental role of chemistry. Same as CHEM& 110. Only one of the two (CHEM 100 or CHEM&110) may be taken for credit.

CHEM& 110 Chemical Concepts w/ Lab • 6 Cr.

Presents the topics of chemistry in a relatively non-mathematical way and focuses on the social and environmental roles of chemistry. Course covers atomic and molecular structure, measurement, the periodic table, and acids and bases. The laboratory expands upon the course materials. Same as CHEM 100. Only one of the two (CHEM 100 or CHEM& 110) may be taken for credit.

CHEM& 121 Introduction to Chemistry • 6 Cr.

Introduces simplified atomic and molecular theory. Students investigate the chemistry of solutions, gases, liquids, and solids and examine quantitative relationships in chemical processes. Format includes lecture, discussion, and laboratory. Prerequisites: MATH 078 or MATH 098 with a C or better, or placement into MATH 099 or higher.

CHEM& 131 Introduction to Organic/Biochemistry • 6 Cr.

Presents organic chemistry and biochemistry, with emphasis on functional groups, reaction synthesis, and biochemical applications. Format includes lecture, discussion, and laboratory. Prerequisite: CHEM& 121 or permission of instructor.

Description starting Summer 2018

Presents organic chemistry and biochemistry, with emphasis on functional groups, reaction synthesis, and biochemical applications. Format includes lecture, discussion, and laboratory. Prerequisite: CHEM& 121 or higher level chemistry courses with a C (2.0) or better, or permission of instructor.

CHEM& 140 General Chemistry Preparation w/Lab • 6 Cr.

Preparatory chemistry for science and engineering majors intending to take the general chemistry series (161/162 /163). Topics include: atomic structure, stoichiometry, solutions, bonding, acids-bases, and oxidation-reduction. A quantitative approach and problem solving is emphasized. Prerequisite: Math 099 (with C or better) or placement into Math 141 or higher.

CHEM& 161 General Chemistry I • 6 Cr.

First in a three-course chemistry sequence for science and engineering students. The 161/162/163 series covers atomic structure, stoichiometry, solutions, gas laws, periodic law, bonding, molecular orbital theory, colligative properties, radioactivity, thermochemistry, equilibrium, acids, bases, oxidation-reduction, electrochemistry, kinetics, and simple organic chemistry. Courses in the series take a quantitative approach, format includes lecture, discussion, and laboratory. Prerequisites: Completion or concurrent enrollment in MATH& 141 or higher, or placement into MATH& 142 or higher. Also, CHEM& 140 with a C or better (or equivalent), or by chemistry placement exam.

CHEM& 162 General Chemistry II • 6 Cr.

Second in a three-course chemistry sequence for science and engineering students. Prerequisite: CHEM& 161 with a C or better.

CHEM& 163 General Chemistry III • 6 Cr.

Third in a three-course chemistry sequence for science and engineering students. Prerequisite: CHEM& 162 with a C or better.

CHEM 199 Individual Studies in Chemistry • V1-5 Cr.

Allows for special projects, student research and independent study in Chemistry by an individual student. May be repeated for a maximum of 15 credits. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.

CHEM& 261 Organic Chemistry I • 6 Cr.

The first of a three-course series in organic chemistry. The 261/262/263 series covers structure, nomenclature, reactions, and synthesis of organic compounds. Format includes laboratory work. Prerequisite: CHEM& 161 and CHEM& 162 and CHEM& 163.

Description starting Summer 2018

The first of a three-course series in organic chemistry. The 261/262/263 series covers structure, nomenclature, reactions, and synthesis of organic compounds. Format includes laboratory work. Prerequisite: CHEM& 163 with a C or better.

CHEM& 262 Organic Chemistry II • 6 Cr.

Second in a three-course organic chemistry sequence. Format includes laboratory work. Prerequisite: CHEM& 261.

CHEM& 263 Organic Chemistry III • 6 Cr.

Third in a three-course sequence. Continues the lecture and lab component of CHEM& 261 and CHEM& 262. Topics include functional groups and biologically important compounds. Format includes laboratory work. Prerequisite: CHEM& 262.

CHEM 272 Undergraduate Research in Chemistry • 6 Cr.

This course is designed for students to get a head start into the field of fundamental and applied chemistry research by providing knowledge and experience using the scientific method to tackle real life problems. Topics include developing a question and hypothesis, designing an experiment, collecting data, drawing conclusions from findings and presenting research. Format includes lecture and laboratory. Prerequisite: CHEM& 161 with a C or better, or instructor permission.

CHEM 275 Introduction to Instrumental Analysis • 6 Cr.

Designed for students interested in a career in molecular biosciences. Topics include measurements and calculations in analytical chemistry, interaction of radiation with matter, spectroscopy, mass spectrometry, and separation techniques. Format includes lecture, discussion, and laboratory. Prerequisite: CHEM& 163, and BIOL& 160 or BIOL& 211. Recommended: ENGL& 235 and BTS 147.

CHEM 299 Individual Studies in Chemistry • V1-5 Cr.

Allows for advanced special projects, student research and independent study in Chemistry by an individual student. May be repeated for a maximum of 15 credits. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.

CHEM 405 Biochemistry I • 5 Cr.

The first in a two-quarter sequence for students in the Bachelor in Applied Science in Molecular Biosciences, science majors and students interested in careers in pharmacy, dentistry, medicine, veterinary medicine and medical technology. Topics include protein structure and function; carbohydrates and their metabolism, electron transport processes and some of the major metabolic pathways. Previously CHEM 265. Only CHEM 265 or CHEM 405 can be taken for credit, not both. Prerequisite: BIOL& 211 and CHEM& 261 or equivalent.

CHEM 406 Biochemistry II • 5 Cr.

The second in a two-quarter sequence for students in the Bachelor in Applied Science in Molecular Biosciences, science majors and students interested in careers in pharmacy, dentistry, medicine, veterinary medicine and medical technology. Topics include lipid structure, metabolism, transport and biosynthesis, nucleic acid structure and function, DNA replication, transcription and translation. Previously CHEM 266. Only CHEM 266 or CHEM 406 can be taken for credit, not both. Prerequisite: CHEM 405 with a C or better.

CHIN& 121 Chinese I • 5 Cr.

Introduces basic functional language ability by acquiring vocabulary and skills in grammar, pronunciation, and the Pinyin (Romanized) writing system. Students practice sounds and tones, vocabulary, grammatical constructions and practice pronunciation and Chinese characters writing. Includes listening, speaking, reading and writing skills using traditional and simplified characters. Course includes elements of Chinese culture, art, and music.

CHIN& 122 Chinese II • 5 Cr.

Introduces functional language ability in spoken and written Chinese. Continues elements of Chinese culture. Students practice sounds and tones, vocabulary, and grammatical constructions, practice pronunciation and Chinese characters writing and use Chinese in authentic situations. Recommended: CHIN& 121, one year of High School or permission of instructor.

CHIN& 123 Chinese III • 5 Cr.

Further expands functional language ability in spoken and written Chinese. Students practice sounds and tones, vocabulary, and grammatical constructions and both traditional and both traditional and simplified characters and practice using Chinese in authentic situations. Continues understanding of Chinese culture. Recommended: CHIN& 122, two years of High School or permission of instructor.

CHIN 194 Special Topics in Chinese • V1-5 Cr.

Allows specialized or in-depth study of a subject supplementing the Chinese curriculum. Topics are announced in the quarterly schedule. May be repeated for a maximum of 15 credits.

CHIN 195 Special Topics in Chinese • V1-5 Cr.

Allows specialized or in-depth study of a subject supplementing the Chinese curriculum. Topics are announced in the quarterly schedule. May be repeated for a maximum of 15 credits.

CHIN 196 Special Topics in Chinese • V1-5 Cr.

Allows specialized or in-depth study of a subject supplementing the Chinese curriculum. Topics are announced in the quarterly schedule. May be repeated for a maximum of 15 credits.

CHIN 197 Special Topics in Chinese • V1-5 Cr.

Allows specialized or in-depth study of a subject supplementing the Chinese curriculum. Topics are announced in the quarterly schedule. May be repeated for a maximum of 15 credits.

CHIN 199 Individual Studies in Chinese • V1-5 Cr.

Covers directed readings, special projects and independent study by an individual student. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.

CHIN& 221 Chinese IV • 5 Cr.

Reviews and expands basic, first-year Chinese skills. Increases understanding of Chinese grammar, expand vocabulary, and improves productive and receptive language skills within a cultural context. Includes both traditional and simplified characters. Increases understanding of Chinese culture. Recommended: CHIN& 123 or permission of instructor.

CHIN& 222 Chinese V • 5 Cr.

Reviews and expands basic, first-year Chinese skills. Increases understanding of Chinese culture, grammar, expands vocabulary, improves productivity and receptive language skills within a cultural context. Covers both traditional and simplified characters and practices using Chinese in authentic situations. Recommended: CHIN& 221 or permission of instructor.

CHIN& 223 Chinese VI • 5 Cr.

Reviews and expands basic, first-year Chinese skills. Increases understanding of Chinese culture and society, grammar, expand vocabulary, and improves productive and receptive language skills within a cultural context. Recommended: CHIN& 222 or permission of instructor.

CHIN 294 Special Topics in Chinese • V1-5 Cr.

Allows specialized or in-depth study of a subject supplementing the Chinese curriculum. Topics are announced in the quarterly schedule. May be repeated for a maximum of 15 credits.

CHIN 295 Special Topics in Chinese • V1-5 Cr.

Allows specialized or in-depth study of a subject supplementing the Chinese curriculum. Topics are announced in the quarterly schedule. May be repeated for a maximum of 15 credits.

CHIN 296 Special Topics in Chinese • V1-5 Cr.

Allows specialized or in-depth study of a subject supplementing the Chinese curriculum. Topics are announced in the quarterly schedule. May be repeated for a maximum of 15 credits.

CHIN 297 Special Topics in Chinese • V1-5 Cr.

Allows specialized or in-depth study of a subject supplementing the Chinese curriculum. Topics are announced in the quarterly schedule. May be repeated for a maximum of 15 credits.

CJ& 101 Introduction to Criminal Justice • 5 Cr.

Surveys the criminal justice process from arrest through release. Students examine the relationships and responsibilities of and among police, prosecutors, courts, and probation and parole systems.

CJ 102 Policing Operations • 5 Cr.

Presents organizational structure and concepts of staff and line, chain of command, and hierarchy. Students examine advantages and limitations of organizational models for agencies of varying sizes.

CJ 103 Criminal Justice Report Writing • 5 Cr.

Presents the fundamentals of written communication, using study guides and practice in mechanics and processes. Activities concentrate on preparing professional documents with appropriate sentence and paragraph structure. Writing models are used to demonstrate effective rhetorical strategies and stylistic options.

CJ 106 American Corrections System • 5 Cr.

Introduces basic concepts, theories, principles and an historical overview of the system as it pertains to the institutional control and supervision of adult offenders. Prerequisite: CJ& 101 or CJ& 112 recommended.

CJ 109 Introduction to Juvenile Justice System • 5 Cr.

Introduces basic concepts, theories, principles and an historical overview of the criminal process as they relate to the formal and informal adjudication of violent, serious, and chronic juvenile offenders. Prerequisite: CJ& 101 recommended.

CJ& 110 Criminal Law • 5 Cr.

Surveys theories and concepts of law pertaining to the criminal justice system. Topics include the Revised Code of Washington and specific state and federal constitutional amendments.

CJ& 112 Introduction to Criminology • 5 Cr.

Surveys the study of crime, causation, and criminals. Topics include types and characteristics of offenders and criminal behaviors, recidivism, environmental influences, diagnostic methods, prediction, prevention, and social policy.

CJ 125 Introduction to Visual Tracking • 5 Cr.

The student will learn how to identify, interpret and document physical evidence directly related to human movement and travel. The student will learn how this evidence is relevant to the processing of a crime scene while working with a tracking team to identify and follow sign evidence to reach a valid conclusion pertaining to the person's movements and behavior. The student will learn about different tracking applications to include Search and Rescue.

CJ 194 Special Topics in Criminal Justice • V1-10 Cr.

Covers supplementary or unusual classes related to the field. Topics are announced in the class schedule. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.

CJ 195 Special Topics in Criminal Justice • V1-10 Cr.

Covers supplementary or unusual classes related to the field. Topics are announced in the class schedule. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.

CJ 196 Special Topics in Criminal Justice • V1-10 Cr.

Covers supplementary or unusual classes related to the field. Topics are announced in the class schedule. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.

CJ 197 Special Topics in Criminal Justice • V1-10 Cr.

Covers supplementary or unusual classes related to the field. Topics are announced in the class schedule. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.

CJ 198 Seminar in Criminal Justice • V1-10 Cr.

Includes seminars, workshops, etc., for which college credit is offered.

CJ 199 Individual Studies in Criminal Justice • V1-10 Cr.

Covers directed readings, special projects, and independent study by an individual student. May be repeated for a maximum of 15 credits. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.

CJ 200 Criminal Evidence & Procedures-Police Officer • 5 Cr.

Surveys the steps in collecting evidence, both real and circumstantial, in a criminal case. Students examine the legal processes from investigation through the trial process.

CJ 202 Principles of Criminal Investigation • 5 Cr.

Presents fundamental investigative techniques used within the criminal justice system. Topics include discovery, preservation, and presentation of evidence, methods of obtaining information and developing sources, and functions of a criminal laboratory.

CJ 204 Constitutional Law • 5 Cr.

Studies the Fourth, Fifth, Sixth, and Fourteenth Amendments to the U. S. Constitution and their impact on contemporary police practices. Students analyze Supreme Court decisions concerning arrests, searches, seizures, self-incrimination, and post-indictment right to counsel.

CJ 206 Community-Oriented Policing • 5 Cr.

Analyzes the philosophy and strategies essential to community-oriented policing. Students examine the role of the police in American society and the dynamics of the interaction between the police and their constituents.

CJ 242 Race, Law, and Justice • 5 Cr.

Examines the strengths and weaknesses of the police carrying out their mission in a culturally diverse society. Students develop an understanding of the influences of culture, race, ethnicity, sexual orientation, and socioeconomic class on the legal process and within society.

CJ 248 Ethics in Criminal Justice • 5 Cr.

Examines the philosophical, moral, and ethical bases of human behavior from a criminal justice perspective. Students discuss justice, law, and punishment, moral decision-making; and ethical and legal dilemmas in law enforcement. Same as PHIL 248. Either CJ 248 or PHIL 248 may be taken for credit, not both.

CJ 253 Drug Use & the Law in American Society • 5 Cr.

Studies the unique demands that alcohol and drug offenses place on the criminal justice system. Students learn how the procedures of investigation, information management, and prosecution differs between alcohol and drug crimes and other criminal offenses.

CJ 294 Special Topics in Criminal Justice • V1-10 Cr.

Covers supplementary or unusual classes related to the field. Topics are announced in the class schedule. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.

CJ 295 Special Topics in Criminal Justice • V1-10 Cr.

Covers supplementary or unusual classes related to the field. Topics are announced in the class schedule. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.

CJ 296 Special Topics in Criminal Justice • V1-10 Cr.

Covers supplementary or unusual classes related to the field. Topics are announced in the class schedule. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.

CJ 297 Special Topics in Criminal Justice • V1-10 Cr.

Covers supplementary or unusual classes related to the field. Topics are announced in the class schedule. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.

CJ 298 Seminar in Criminal Justice • V1-10 Cr.

Includes seminars, workshops, etc., for which college credit is offered.

CJ 299 Individual Studies in Criminal Justice • V1-10 Cr.

Covers directed readings, special projects, and independent study by an individual student. May be repeated for a maximum of 15 credits. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.

CMST& 101 Introduction to Communication • 5 Cr.

Explores effective communication in one-to-one, small group, and one-to-many settings. Students analyze their communication skills and practice techniques to become more effective. Format includes public speaking.

CMST& 102 Introduction to Mass Media • 5 Cr.

Examines the operation and impact of American media. Students analyze media influence on society and the relationships among media, audience, and government. Current events and issues are discussed.

CMST 105 Debate I • 5 Cr.

Exposes students to argumentation structure in basic parliamentary debate and speech. Students spend a significant amount of time conducting research, preparing and debating. Students may choose to travel and compete at the collegiate level in speech & debate tournaments as well. Recommended: ENGL& 101.

CMST 106 Debate II • 5 Cr.

Students are exposed to argumentation structure in basic parliamentary debate and speech spending significant time conducting research, preparing and debating at a more advanced level than CMST105. Students may choose to travel and compete at the collegiate level in speech & debate tournaments. Recommended: ENGL 101 and CMST 105.

CMST 107 Debate III • 5 Cr.

Continues material from CMST 106 with argumentation structure in basic parliamentary debate and speech. Requires a significant amount of time conducting research, preparing and debating. Students may choose to travel and compete at the collegiate level in speech & debate tournaments. Recommended: ENGL& 101 and CMST 106.

CMST 114 Introduction to Producing Motion Pictures • 5 Cr.

This course focuses on the elements and process of all aspects of film production from pre-production to the end of post-production. The course will also cover production skills and the impact of such on the viewer. Students will leave the course with a producing plan portfolio.

CMST 115 Visual Storytelling • 5 Cr.

Provides an introduction to key digital storytelling principles and message design for the interactive, rich media environments of the 21st Century. Covers these principles through an examination of media history, architecture, comics, theatre, cinema, visual language, information design, storytelling, and videogames. Prerequisite: ENGL& 101 recommended.

CMST 119 History of Animation • 5 Cr.

Provides an overview and study of the history of animation, from the early magic lantern shows of the late nineteenth century to current and emerging digital animation technologies. The history of early film animation is compared and contrasted with the history of animation for the web, showing how the two types of animation often parallel each other in style and development. Course includes a series of lectures, discussions, and a variety of film and video clips of both classic and digital animation.

CMST 120 Film History • 5 Cr.

Course examines the historical origins of cinema from 1880 to 1945, including the developments in film making from Europe, to Russia to Hollywood. Course looks at the different uses of and roles played by film including the use of movies as ideological tools. Recommended: ENGL& 101 and completion of any CMST Theory course.

CMST 121 Exploring the Documentary Film • 5 Cr.

Examines the theory, practice, history and ethics of documentary film making.

CMST 123 Introduction to Digital Cinema • 3 Cr.

This course is designed to introduce students to the latest cameras used in cinema (i.e. RED camera, digital film, HD). Students will be exposed to camera equipment, discuss theories, and critique use of various cameras in film making. The course is designed as an intensive workshop.

CMST 124 Introduction to Line Producing in Filmmaking • 2 Cr.

This course is designed to introduce students to the roles and responsibilities of a line producer in creating motion pictures. The course is delivered as an intensive workshop.

CMST 131 Exploring the Digital Future • 5 Cr.

Surveys the history and future of global communication technologies. Students discuss the effects of the computer revolution and digital communication on society and explore career opportunities in digital communication fields.

CMST 132 Techniques & Technology of Propaganda • 5 Cr.

Examines tools and processes for targeting information to specific audiences for specific purposes. Students analyze how film, video, and multimedia can be used to influence opinions, generate sales, etc. Students test persuasion techniques with simple media presentations.

CMST 133 Media Aesthetics • 5 Cr.

Gives insight into media aesthetics through the study of production techniques. Students develop interpretive skills by analyzing lighting, editing, color, sound, and interactivity. Class format includes lectures, media clips, and guest speakers.

CMST 134 Cultural Studies in Mass Media • 5 Cr.

Introduces terms, analytical techniques, and interpretive strategies commonly used in cultural studies. Explores how mass mediated artifacts are produced, shaped, distributed, consumed, and responded to in diverse ways. Students investigate these varied dimensions of culture to understand them in their broader social, aesthetic, ethnical and political context.

CMST 136 Writing for the Web • 5 Cr.

Introduces the cognitive, creative, and technical tools needed to effectively create text and publish ideas for the World Wide Web. Students explore and practice styles of writing to communicate effectively in various online settings.

CMST 138 Media Digital Law & Ethics • 5 Cr.

Explores the legal and ethical issues raised by modern communication technologies. Specific topics include copyright, free speech, pornography, and universal internet access. Students analyze how the U.S. justice system responds to emerging technologies. Class format incorporates lectures, discussions, case studies, and media clips.

CMST 141 Introduction to Media Writing • 5 Cr.

Students learn interviewing, basic research, effective expression and editing through note taking, interviewing, drafting and revision. Emphasizes observation skills and choice of language, structure and source material to communicate events and ideas to selected audiences. Students are encouraged to submit writing to the BC student newspaper. Prerequisite: Placement by assessment into ENGL& 101, completion of ENGL 092 or ENGL 093 with a C- or better, or entry code.

CMST 143 Editing Techniques • 3 Cr.

Applies the techniques and responsibilities of newspaper editing. Students practice copy reading and headline writing.

CMST 144 Print and Online Media • 3 Cr.

Presents the basics of newspaper, magazine and online media design strategies. Topics include page makeup, assignment planning and picture editing. Requires additional lab time outside of class. Prerequisite: CMST 141 or ENGL& 101 or entry code.

CMST 145 Advertising • 3 Cr.

Covers audience, market research, effective messaging and design. Students gain practical experience working on advertising campaigns on campus for the newspaper and other entities.

CMST 146 News Staff • 3 Cr.

Continues CMST 141 with further skills development and practical applications. Students typically complete major reporting assignments each quarter. Requires additional time outside of class. Prerequisite: CMST 141 or ENGL& 101.

CMST 151 Introduction to Public Relations • 5 Cr.

Provides an overview of the field of public relations from history to practice. Introduces writing, interviewing and publicity techniques and creates press kits for a variety of audiences. Prerequisite: CMST 141 or ENGL& 101.

CMST 161 Basic Broadcasting • 5 Cr.

Develops skills in announcing and audio operations. Students review radio history and regulations and get an introduction to commercials, news, production, and station organization.

CMST 163 Radio Operations: Announcing/Production • 5 Cr.

Develops broadcast voice and production skills. Students practice tape editing and mixing and develop production values through class projects. Prerequisite: CMST 161 and permission of instructor.

CMST 194 Special Topics in Communication • V1-10 Cr.

Allows specialized study of a subject supplementing the speech communication curriculum. Topics are announced in the class schedule. May be repeated for maximum of 15 credits.

CMST 195 Special Topics in Communication • V1-10 Cr.

Allows specialized study of a subject supplementing the speech communication curriculum. Topics are announced in the class schedule. May be repeated for maximum of 15 credits.

CMST 196 Special Topics in Communication • V1-10 Cr.

Allows specialized study of a subject supplementing the speech communication curriculum. Topics are announced in the class schedule. May be repeated for maximum of 15 credits.

CMST 197 Special Topics in Communication • V1-10 Cr.

Allows specialized study of a subject supplementing the speech communication curriculum. Topics are announced in the class schedule. May be repeated for maximum of 15 credits.

CMST 202 Survey of Speech Communication • 5 Cr.

Introduces a variety of communication processes to give a basic understanding of speech communication. Students explore interpersonal, small group, and intercultural communication. Same as SPCH 102 and SPCH 202.

CMST& 210 Interpersonal Communication • 5 Cr.

Focuses on effective interpersonal communication in relationships through lecture, class discussion, and activities. Topics addressed include: culture, language, nonverbal communication, listening, perception, and conflict management.

CMST 216 Scripting for Film Video & Multimedia • 5 Cr.

Students learn the mechanics and format used for film and television as well as the writer's job in pre-production and production. In addition, students are introduced to non-linear writing for new interactive multimedia technologies. Prerequisite: CMST 141 or ENGL& 101 or ENGL& 235 or ENGL 271 or ENGL 272 or equivalent English course at another college with a C- or better, or an entry code.

CMST& 220 Public Speaking • 5 Cr.

Presents the essentials of effective public speaking. Students explore topic selection, research methods, organization, analysis of material and audience, and use of visual aids, and practice preparing and delivering various types of speeches.

CMST& 230 Small Group Communication • 5 Cr.

Explores effective communication in small groups. Students examine aspects of group process, including leadership, conflict management, decision-making, conformity, and critical thinking. Students work in groups to test theories and practice skills. Fulfills social science course requirement at BC.

CMST 241 News Features & Magazine Writing • 5 Cr.

Intended for intermediate writers to focus on non-fiction writing for magazine, newspaper investigative features, and online publication. Covers research and interview techniques, editing and revision, and strategies for "pitching" and perfecting articles for publication. Prerequisite: CMST 141 or ENGL& 101 with a C- or better or entry code.

CMST 245 Practicum in Journalism • 5 Cr.

Provides practical experience in community journalism. Students work 10 hours per week at a local newspaper under an editor's supervision. Enrollment only by arrangement with the Communication Studies Program. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.

CMST 250 Communication in a Diverse Workplace • 5 Cr.

Applies communication concepts and theory to the culturally diverse workplace. Covers interpersonal communication, teamwork and meeting effectiveness, electronic communication, conflict management, managerial effectiveness and organizational culture. Recommended: Placement in ENGL& 101, or higher.

CMST 260 Art of Cinematography & Lighting • 5 Cr.

Covers the aesthetics of lighting to create mood, intensify drama and enhance the visual narrative.

CMST 261 Radio News Broadcasting • 5 Cr.

Covers writing, editing, producing, and delivering news for radio. Prerequisite: CMST 141 and CMST 161 or permission of instructor.

CMST 266 Practicum in Broadcasting • 5 Cr.

Provides work experience in a local broadcast outlet. May be repeated for a maximum of 10 credits. Prerequisite: CMST 161 or entry code.

CMST 280 Intercultural Communication • 5 Cr.

Examines the effect of culture on the communication process. Students learn about the influence of culture on communication styles, language, and non-verbal communication. Students practice skills that contribute to intercultural competence.

Description starting Summer 2018

Examines the relationship between culture and various aspects of the communication process. Students explore cultural identity, bias, and worldview. Students practice skills that contribute to intercultural competence in a variety of contexts.

CMST 285 Nonverbal Communication • 5 Cr.

Examines non-verbal behavior and its role in the communication process. Topics include body language, space, touch, dress, and cultural norms. Students analyze their own non-verbal communication techniques.

CMST 291 Making Movies • 5 Cr.

Students work together creating a dramatic motion picture, gain experience in pre-production and production work, and work as part of a crew documenting the making of the dramatic piece. Students receive a copy of the finished work. Recommended: CMST 216.

CMST 294 Special Topics in Communication • V1-10 Cr.

Allows specialized or in-depth study of a subject supplementing the Communications curriculum. Student interest and instructor expertise help determine the topic. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.

CMST 295 Special Topics in Communication • V1-10 Cr.

Allows specialized or in-depth study of a subject supplementing the Communications curriculum. Student interest and instructor expertise help determine the topic. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.

CMST 296 Special Topics in Communication • V1-10 Cr.

Allows specialized or in-depth study of a subject supplementing the Communications curriculum. Student interest and instructor expertise help determine the topic. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.

CMST 297 Special Topics in Communication • V1-10 Cr.

Allows specialized or in-depth study of a subject supplementing the Communications curriculum. Student interest and instructor expertise help determine the topic. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.

CMST 299 Special Projects in Communication • V1-5 Cr.

Covers individual projects in broadcasting, journalism, and advertising, which complement a student's work in other communications courses. May be repeated for a maximum of 15 credits. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.

CMST 330 Intercultural Health Communication • 5 Cr.

Examines how a healthcare practitioner may engage in effective communication with culturally dissimilar individuals in a variety of contexts. Students practice intercultural strategies and skills. Prerequisite: Acceptance to the program or permission of instructor.

CMST 340 Advanced Communication in Business & Technology • 5 Cr.

This course is designed for students accepted into a baccalaureate degree program in business or technology fields. Students identify, self-assess, analyze and apply skills to effectively communicate in culturally diverse business and technology settings. Students explore original research and apply the information they learn to their communication skill repertoire. Topics include: active listening, intercultural communication, collaborating in teams, conflict management, verbal and nonverbal communication and public speaking. Prerequisite: Acceptance into applicable baccalaureate program or permission of instructor. Recommended: CMST 220, CMST 230, or CMST 280.

CMST 350 Professional Communication for the Designer • 5 Cr.

Examines how an Interior Design Professional applies communication theory and concepts to perform effectively in the workplace. Focuses on development of interpersonal skills in a diverse workplace, small group interaction and meeting effectiveness, public presentations, business writing including electronic collaboration, and organizational culture. Course requires significant oral presentation. Prerequisite: Acceptance to the program or permission of instructor.

CS 101 Technology and Computer Science • 5 Cr.

Introduces concepts of computer science through development of fluency in modern technology, while offering students an opportunity to increase skills in a variety of information systems. Computer lab work includes operation of computers on networks, programming fundamentals, logical reasoning, web searching, multimedia applications, basic spreadsheets, and database manipulation. Prerequisite: MATH 098 or higher.

CS 194 Special Topics in Computer Science • V1-10 Cr.

No class description found.

CS 195 Special Topics in Computer Science • V1-10 Cr.

No class description found.

CS 196 Special Topics in Computer Science • V1-10 Cr.

No class description found.

CS 197 Special Topics in Computer Science • V1-10 Cr.

No class description found.

CS 199 Independent Study in Computer Science • V1-5 Cr.

Allows for special projects, student research and independent study in Computer Science by an individual student. May be repeated for a maximum of 15 credits. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.

CS 210 Fundamentals of Computer Science I • 5 Cr.

Introduces computer science and programming for CS majors. Students learn design and implementation of algorithms and programming in a structured, modular language, with emphasis on problem solving, program design, and style. Prerequisite: MATH&141 (or higher), or placement by assessment in MATH&142 or above, or entry code.

Description starting Summer 2018

Introduces computer science and programming for CS majors. Students learn design and implementation of algorithms and programming in a structured, modular language, with emphasis on problem solving, program design, and style. Prerequisite: MATH&142 or higher, with a C- or better,or placement by assessment in MATH&151 or above, or entry code.

CS 211 Fundamentals of Computer Science II • 5 Cr.

Continues CS 210, with data structures algorithm analysis and inheritance. Students learn to create collections, lists, binary trees, and sets. Other topics include sets, generic data types, sorting, recursion, run-time complexity, and graphical user interfaces. Prerequisite: CS 210 or entry code.

CS 212 C++ Data Structures • 5 Cr.

Completes one year sequence with data structures using C++, including lists, hash tables, stacks, queues, trees, and graphs. Contrasts the implementations of such data structures in different languages, specifically the differences between pointers versus references, templates versus generics, dynamic versus static memory allocation, multiple inheritance, and destructors. Prerequisite: CS 211.

CS 250 Management Information Systems • 5 Cr.

Provides basic concepts of information technology in modern business. Topics include data warehouses, decision support systems, electronic commerce, systems development, and risk management. Labs introduce intermediate spreadsheet and database applications in a networked environment. Enforced Prerequisite: CS 101 or entry code. Requires experience with computer databases.

CS 294 Special Topics in Computer Science • V1-10 Cr.

Covers advanced supplementary, contemporary, or focused topics related to Computer Science. Topics are announced in the class schedule. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.

CS 295 Special Topics in Computer Science • V1-10 Cr.

Covers advanced supplementary, contemporary, or focused topics related to Computer Science. Topics are announced in the class schedule. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.

CS 296 Special Topics in Computer Science • V1-10 Cr.

Covers advanced supplementary, contemporary, or focused topics related to Computer Science. Topics are announced in the class schedule. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.

CS 297 Special Topics in Computer Science • V1-10 Cr.

Covers advanced supplementary, contemporary, or focused topics related to Computer Science. Topics are announced in the class schedule. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.

CS 299 Independent Study in Computer Science • V1-5 Cr.

Allows for advanced special projects, student research and independent study in Computer Science by an individual student. May be repeated for a maximum of 15 credits. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.

CS 300 Data Structures • 5 Cr.

This course is an introduction to the fundamental concept of data structures. It explains how to organize and store data efficiently using data structures and how to select appropriate data structures. The course further focuses on understanding the fundamental algorithms and analyzing the time and space complexity of these algorithms. Prerequisite: CS 211 and admission to BS CS program, or permission of instructor.

CS 311 Software Patterns • 5 Cr.  New

Description starting Summer 2018

This course introduces software design paradigms, and design and architectural patterns essential for the creation of flexible, reusable, reliable and maintainable software applications. The course offers students a hands-on opportunity to apply creational, functional and behavioral design patterns, as well as architectural patterns, in a software design. Prerequisites: CS 211 and admission to BS Computer Science program, or instructor's permission.

CS 320 Programming Languages • 5 Cr.

This course is an introduction to the design and implementation of programming languages. The course explores organization and structure of programming languages, run?time behavior and requirements of programs, and programming language specification. The course teaches the programming models underlying different programming paradigms such as functional, logic, scripting and object-oriented languages. Prerequisites: CS 300 and admission to BC CS program, or instructor's permission.

CS 331 Database Systems • 5 Cr.

The course covers the fundamental concepts of database systems. It teaches students the internals of database systems including data model, database design, relational model, relational algebra, SQL, indexing, concurrency control, query processing, transaction management and recovery. This course also aims to teach the new directions involving NoSQL persistence models. Prerequisites: CS 211 and admission to BC CS program, or instructor's permission.

CS 341 Computer Networks • 5 Cr.

The course teaches the fundamentals of computer networks, with emphasis on the Internet. The course covers basic concepts of computer networks, layered network architecture, protocols, network programming interfaces, and concept of network performance. The course also provides students with the opportunity to having a hands-on experience by network programming.. Prerequisites: CS 211 and admission to BS CS program, or instructor's permission.

CS 351 Computer Architecture I • 5 Cr.

This course introduces the functional components of modern computer systems (processor, memory, Input/Output, etc.), characteristics and performance of these components. The course also addresses the interactions among hardware and software components. This course further allows students to develop programming skills while learning computer architecture with assembly programming assignments. Prerequisite: CS 211 and admission to BS CS program, or instructor's permission.

CS 356 Computer Security • 5 Cr.  New

Description starting Summer 2018

This course covers the principles and practice of computer security using a hands-on approach. Participants will learn about techniques, methodologies and processes for the development of efficient and secure software. In addition, the course also covers security development processes, threat modeling, common software vulnerabilities, web site vulnerabilities, defensive coding practices, and security testing. Prerequisite: CS 341.

CS 360 Operating Systems • 5 Cr.

This class introduces the design and implementation of modern, process oriented operating systems, as well as systems programming basics. Primary topics include operating system structure, processes, threads, synchronization, memory management, virtual memory, file systems, I/O subsystem and device management. Prerequisite: CS 351 and admission to BS CS program, or instructor's permission.

CS 401 Algorithms • 5 Cr.

This course teaches the concepts and skills required to design, implement and analyze algorithms for constructing efficient computer programs. The course covers elementary data structures, searching, sorting, graph and string algorithms, and algorithm design principles such as dynamic programming, greedy, divide-and-conquer paradigms. The emphasis is on applications and scientific performance analysis of algorithms. Prerequisites: CS 300, MATH 301 and admission to BS CS program, or instructor's permission.

CS 410 Software Engineering • 5 Cr.

The course teaches the fundamental concepts and principles of software engineering, its tools and techniques, and methods for building reliable software systems. This course introduces all phases of the lifecycle of a software system, including requirements elicitation and analysis, design, implementation, integration, testing, verification and validation, deployment, and maintenance. Prerequisite: CS 300 and admission to BS CS program, or instructor's permission.

CS 420 Theory of Computation • 5 Cr.  New

Description starting Summer 2018

This course introduces students to the mathematical foundations of computation and complexity for problem solving, including the concepts of automata theory, the theory of formal languages and grammars, and the notions of algorithm, decidability, complexity, and computability. Students will develop the ability to understand and conduct mathematical proofs for computation and algorithms in order to solve problems efficiently. Prerequisites: MATH 301 and admission to BC CS program, or instructor's permission.

CS 441 Functional Programming • 5 Cr.  New

Description starting Summer 2018

This course introduces the foundations of functional programming and explores situations when using a Functional Programming language is most beneficial. Students will have the opportunity to apply elements of the functional programming style in daily programming tasks. Prerequisites: CS 211 and admission to BC CS program, or instructor's permission.

CS 455 Cloud Computing • 5 Cr.

This course is an introduction to cloud computing. It teaches distributed computing concepts, the architecture of cloud computing, cloud services, virtualization, and cloud-based data storage. The course provides students with the opportunity to having a hands-on experience by deploying an application that uses cloud architecture for computing and data resources. Prerequisites: CS 331, CS 341, CS 360 and admission to BS CS program, or instructor's permission.

CS 460 Machine Learning • 5 Cr.

This course is an introduction to the fundamentals and applications of machine learning. The course provides students with the opportunity to have theoretical knowledge and practical experience on basic concepts of machine learning with programming assignments. The course focuses on fundamentals, not on providing mastery of specific commercially available tools. Prerequisites: CS 401, MATH 208, MATH 270 and admission to BS CS program, or instructor's permission.

CS 470 Mobile Application Development • 5 Cr.

This course is a project-oriented course on software application development for mobile devices. It teaches the basic principles of mobile application design, development and testing for resource-restricted devices. The course provides students with the opportunity to having a hands-on experience by deploying a real-world mobile application on the Android platform. Prerequisite: CS 300 and admission to BS CS program, or instructor's permission.

CS 481 Senior Capstone I • 3 Cr.

This course focuses on literature review, requirement specification, project management, initial design and prototyping of the three-quarter long computer science project. Students work in teams and are given milestones. The course includes lectures, reading assignments and guest speakers on development process, team working, report writing and emerging trends in computer science. Prerequisites: CS 410 and admission to BS CS program, or instructor's permission.

CS 482 Senior Capstone II • 4 Cr.

This course is the second in a sequence of three senior level capstone courses. This course focuses on detailed design, test plan and implementation of the project. The course includes lectures, reading assignments and guest speakers on development process, test plan, ethics, legal issues, and emerging trends in computer science. Prerequisites: CS 481 and admission to BS CS program, or instructor's permission.

CS 483 Senior Capstone III • 3 Cr.

This course is the third in a sequence of three senior level capstone courses. This course focuses on implementation, test and presentation of the project. The course includes lectures, reading assignments and guest speakers on poster design, innovation and entrepreneurship, presentation skills and emerging trends in computer science. Prerequisites: CS 482 and admission to BS CS program, or instructor's permission.

CS 485 Computer Science Co-Op/Practicum • V1-5 Cr.

Students undertake a full-time or part-time supervised work experience with an agency, firm, or organization approved by the program. Students develop a learning plan before the work project begins and submit a final written report. A written performance review by an onsite technical supervisor will be part of a student's final assessment. Prerequisite: CS 300 and admission to BS CS program, or instructor's permission.

DA 310 Introduction to Analytics • 5 Cr.

Introduces the importance of data management, data analysis and data representation. Includes the use of common statistical tools and their applications in decision-making and research. Emphasis is on quantitative and technology based analysis of real world problems to improve decision-making in various disciplines, along with report writing and presentation skills. Prerequisite: Admission into the program and MATH 130, 138 or MATH& 141 with a C or better; or permission of the instructor.

DA 320 Data Acquisition and Management • 5 Cr.

Learn core concepts of data collection and its management. Topics include collecting data ethically from different sources, assessing data quality, learning techniques to clean, process, and store the data while maintaining privacy and security. Students will research real world examples, using common statistical software and produce reports and presentations. Prerequisite: DA 310 or permission of the instructor.

Description starting Summer 2018

Learn core concepts of data collection and its management. Topics include collecting data ethically from different sources, assessing data quality, learning techniques to clean, process, and store the data while maintaining privacy and security. Students will research real world examples, using common statistical software and produce reports and presentations. Prerequisite: DA 310 with a C or better, or permission of the instructor.

DA 410 Multivariate Analysis • 5 Cr.

Introduce various statistical methods for analyzing more than one outcome variable and understanding the relationships between variables. Topics include a variety of multivariate models such as MANOVA, discriminant functions, canonical correlation, and cluster analysis. The focus will be on real world examples from a variety of sources and using statistical software. Prerequisite: MATH 342 with C or better. Recommended: DA 460.

DA 420 Predictive Analytics • 5 Cr.

Students will study the process of formulating business objectives, data selection, preparation, and partition to successfully design, build, evaluate, and implement predictive models for a variety of practical business applications. Topics include a variety of predictive models such as classification, decision trees, machine learning, supervised and unsupervised learning. Prerequisite: MATH 342 with a C or better, or permission of the instructor. Recommended: DA 460.

DA 430 Marketing Analytics • 5 Cr.

This course introduces a quantitatively oriented view of marketing strategy and provides tools and methods to leverage data to inform marketing strategies. Topics may include a variety of marketing analytics strategic models and metrics such as competitive analysis, segmentation, targeting and positioning. The focus will be on real world examples from a variety of sources and using statistical software. Prerequisite: MATH 342 with a C or better, or permission of the instructor. Recommended: DA 460.

Description starting Summer 2018

This course introduces a quantitatively oriented view of marketing strategy and provides tools and methods to leverage data to inform marketing strategies. Topics may include a variety of marketing analytics strategic models and metrics such as competitive analysis, segmentation, targeting and positioning. The focus will be on real world examples from a variety of sources and using statistical software. Prerequisite: DA 310 with a C or better, or permission of the instructor.

DA 460 Data Analysis with Software and Programming • 5 Cr.

This course introduces modern software and programming languages for effective data analysis, such as R and Python. Students will learn how to configure software environment, apply programming concepts, build statistical models, and write code to analyze data sets. Prerequisite: BA 240 or DA 310 or MATH 341 with a C or better, and admission into BAS Data Analytics program, or permission of instructor.

DA 485 Data Analytics Capstone Project • 5 Cr.

In this integrative learning course, students will engage in planning, designing, implementing and presenting a project demonstrating the attainment of business analytics program learning outcomes, as well as professional competencies and career readiness. Prerequisite: DA 420 with a C or better, or permission of instructor.

DANCE 130 Jazz Technique I • 2 Cr.

Develops the movement techniques that are the basis for a highly energized, theatrical style of jazz dance. May be repeated for a maximum of 6 credits.

DANCE 131 Jazz Technique II • 2 Cr.

Continues DANCE 130, with students performing at a more advanced level. Students learn nuances of style, rhythm, and dynamics. May be repeated for a maximum of 6 credits. Prerequisite: DANCE 130 or equivalent or permission of instructor.

DANCE 140 Ballet Technique I • 2 Cr.

Introduces the principles, techniques, and vocabulary of classical ballet. Students learn placement, flexibility, strength, and coordination. For beginning and advanced-beginning students. May be repeated for a maximum of 6 credits.

DANCE 141 Ballet Technique II • 2 Cr.

Expansion of the principles, techniques, and vocabulary of classical ballet. Students continue to develop in all areas of technique as they gain flexibility, strength and coordination. For advanced beginning, intermediate and continuing students. Prerequisite: DANCE 140 or equivalent.

DANCE 151 Contemporary Dance I • 2 Cr.

Introduces basic technique and movement studies. Students gain flexibility and strength together with movement vocabulary. May be repeated for a maximum of 6 credits. Same as PE 151. Either DANCE 151 or PE 151 may be taken for credit, not both.

DANCE 152 Contemporary Dance II • 2 Cr.

Continues Contemporary Dance I with longer and more challenging movement combinations. Students should consult with the program advisor to determine ability. May be repeated for a maximum of 6 credits. Same as PE 152. Either DANCE 152 or PE 152 may be taken for credit, not both.

DANCE 194 Special Topic in Dance • V1-5 Cr.

Allows focused study of topics supplementing dance. Topics are announced in the class schedule.

DANCE 195 Special Topic in Dance • V1-5 Cr.

Allows focused study of topics supplementing dance. Topics are announced in the class schedule.

DANCE 196 Special Topic in Dance • V1-5 Cr.

Allows focused study of topics supplementing dance. Topics are announced in the class schedule.

DANCE 197 Special Topic in Dance • V1-5 Cr.

Allows focused study of topics supplementing dance. Topics are announced in the class schedule.

DANCE 201 Dance Ensemble I • V1-5 Cr.

Emphasizes dance as a performing art form. Students learn in various settings, including a company class, formal and informal improvisation, and solo or small group work. Course may be repeated for a maximum of 15 credits. Prerequisite: Audition and permission of instructor.

DANCE 202 Dance Ensemble II • V1-5 Cr.

Continues DANCE 201, with emphasis on rehearsing for specific dance works. Students with appropriate experience and ability get an introduction to choreography. Course may be repeated for a maximum of 15 credits. Prerequisite: DANCE 201 or permission of instructor.

DANCE 203 Dance Ensemble III • V1-5 Cr.

Continues DANCE 202, with emphasis on performance. Students gain technical and performing skills and experience in dance concert production. Course may be repeated for a maximum of 15 credits. Prerequisite: DANCE 202 or permission of instructor.

DANCE 299 Individual Research • V1-3 Cr.

No class description found.

DBA 130 Database Theory • 5 Cr.

Develops in-depth understanding of database concepts and terminology, emphasizing the relational databases model. Understanding the role of Structured Query Language (SQL), data modeling and normalization of database tables. Prerequisite: BUSIT 103 with a C or better. Placement by assessment into ENGL& 101, or completion of ENGL 092 or 093 with a C or better.

DBA 232 Database Administration • 5 Cr.

Develops the concepts and skills required to perform the duties of Database Administrator (DBA) in organizations using large relational databases. Students develop coherent plans for security, disaster recovery, backup and restore, replication and other administrative functions, including the creation and use of SQL scripts to automate administrative tasks. Prerequisite: DBA 130 with a C- or better. Placement by assessment into ENGL& 101 or ENGL 092 or 093 with a C- or better.

DBA 233 Advanced Database Administration • 5 Cr.

Provides students with advanced concepts and hands-on practice in database administration. Topics include: creating and managing indexes, multi-user issues (locks, data integrity), replication, data warehousing, data analysis services, advanced Data Transformation Services, full text search and English query. Prerequisite: DBA 232 with a C- or better or entry code.

DBA 294 Special Topics in Database Administration • V1-10 Cr.

Allows specialized or in-depth study of a subject related to database administration. Topics are announced in the quarterly schedule. May be repeated for a maximum of 15 credits of different topics. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.

DBA 295 Special Topics in Database Administration • V1-10 Cr.

Allows specialized or in-depth study of a subject related to database administration. Topics are announced in the quarterly schedule. May be repeated for a maximum of 15 credits of different topics. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.

DBA 296 Special Topics in Database Administration • V1-10 Cr.

Allows specialized or in-depth study of a subject related to database administration. Topics are announced in the quarterly schedule. May be repeated for a maximum of 15 credits of different topics. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.

DBA 297 Special Topics in Database Administration • V1-10 Cr.

Allows specialized or in-depth study of a subject related to database administration. Topics are announced in the quarterly schedule. May be repeated for a maximum of 15 credits of different topics. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.

DBA 299 Individual Studies in Database Administration • V1-10 Cr.

Covers directed readings, special projects, and independent study by an individual student. May be repeated for a maximum of 15 credits. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.

DEVED 020 Job Preparedness • V1-8 Cr.

No class description found.

DEVED 061 Strategies for Learning English: Reading • 5 Cr.

Prepares English-as-a-second-language students for credit courses by building reading comprehension skills and vocabulary. Students participate in listening and speaking activities coordinated with reading topics. DEVED 061 and 062 are linked and must be taken together. May be repeated for a maximum of 15 credits. Prerequisite: Placement by assessment.

DEVED 062 Strategies-Learning English: Grammar/Writing • 5 Cr.

Prepares English-as-a-second-language students for credit courses by developing grammar and writing skills at the sentence and paragraph level. Writing and editing work coordinate with the reading, speaking, and listening activities in DEVED 061. DEVED 061 and 062 are linked and must be taken at the same time. May be repeated for a maximum of 15 credits.

DEVED 074 Strategies for Learning Nursing Content Part IV • 2 Cr.

No class description found.

DMA 100 Portfolio and Employment I • 2 Cr.

Introduces students to the digital media industry and leads them though the creation of a personalized pathway for Digital Media Arts degree completion and employment. Students will explore industry trends, standards and expectations, and will complete a self-assessment process resulting in an initial course of study. The importance of portfolios for obtaining employment will be introduced. Required first-quarter course for students entering the DMA degree program. .

DMA 102 Digital Design and Storytelling • 5 Cr.

Explores storytelling from oral and written traditions and those found in today's visual and social media. Students will analyze stories, characters, narrative elements and themes and review visual media through the lens of story structure. Students will also develop stories, characters, and storyboards and learn processes for carrying a project from initial idea to completion. Recommended prerequisite or concurrent enrollment: DMA 100.

DMA 103 Graphic Design Fundamentals • 5 Cr.

This course provides foundational knowledge of graphic design theory, tools and processes. Introduces students to the technologies, theories, practices and techniques of graphic design. Students will use graphic design tools and apply basic visual design theory to create and manage digital images, graphics, illustrations and effects. The impact delivery environments have on design will also be explored. Recommended prerequisite or concurrent enrollment: DMA 100.

DMA 104 Motion Graphic Fundamentals • 5 Cr.

An introduction to the technologies, theories, practices and techniques used to create motion graphics as used in animations, gaming environments and special effect videos. Students will apply basic moving image design theory to create and manage moving images, graphics, illustrations and effects. End use requirements for various applications of moving graphics will also be explored as well as simple audio editing tools. Recommended prerequisite or concurrent enrollment: DMA 100.

DMA 105 Production Studio • 5 Cr.

Provides students with practical experience working on collaborative teams while applying design principles and processes. Small teams will be taught to work together to carry a design solution through the cycle of pre-production including steps such as working with clients, creating design documents, making pitches, drafting contingency plans and budgeting. Prerequisite: DMA 100 and 103 at BC with a C- or better, or instructor permission. Recommended that students be in third quarter of enrollment or later.

DMA 106 Animation and Game Design Fundamentals • 5 Cr.

Provides foundational knowledge of animation and game design theory, tools and processes. Introduces the basic terminology, concepts, and principles of animation and game design. Students gain an understanding of historical perspective, current technologies, applications of animation, basic principles of 2D and 3D animation, the use of animation in game design and conceptual level design for games. Animation and game delivery platforms and standards are also introduced. Recommended prerequisite or concurrent enrollment: DMA 100.

DMA 107 Web Design Fundamentals • 5 Cr.

Provides a hands-on overview of the design, creation and use of media-rich websites. Students will create web sites using XHTML basic CSS and elemental JavaScript. Web site structures, industry standards, social media and delivery platforms for web multimedia will also be explored. Recommended prerequisite or concurrent enrollment: DMA 100.

DMA 108 Video Fundamentals • 5 Cr.

Introduces the use of video across media through instruction and hands-on experiences. Students study video technologies, basic equipment operation, video composition, basic lighting and audio production, delivery platforms and standards, and visual storytelling while gaining an understanding of the pre-production, production and post-production phases of media development. Recommended prerequisite or concurrent enrollment: DMA 100.

DMA 111 Game Culture & Interactive Worlds • 5 Cr.

Game Culture & Interactive Worlds provides an overview of gaming and real time interactive simulations. Includes sections on history, aesthetics, design, technology, narrative, middleware, marketing, artificial intelligence, world building, culture, social issues, and 'serious' games. Also provides a broad framework for understanding video game technologies and communications in multi-user online worlds. Recommended: ENGL& 101.

DMA 125 Drawing for Animation I • 5 Cr.

Introduces the fundamental principles of drawing for animation. Students work with perspectives in drawing, creating characters and silhouettes that convey movement and emotions, and in using different drawing effects to change the mood and intent of the drawing.

DMA 126 Drawing for Animation II • 5 Cr.

A continuation of DMA 125. Students learn advanced drawing skills and techniques to be applied to the development of animation sequences. Emphasis is placed on creating and developing characters and compositions that effectively support the storytelling. Prerequisite: DMA 125 at BC with a C- or better; or entry code.

DMA 140 Gaming Theory • 5 Cr.

Students will analyze game design, game play and the role of the design document in the game development process. Activities include planning, design and industry-standard documentation of a concept, menu, level and campaign for a game. Suggested for game design or animation students or those interested in related careers.

DMA 152 Audio & Recording for Digital Media • 5 Cr.

Introduces basic audio for use in video and interactive media applications. Topics include basic sound characteristics, microphones, single and multi-track recording techniques, and sound reinforcement and enhancement. Students work on a production team to complete audio productions. Recommended prerequisite or concurrent enrollment: DMA 100.

DMA 155 Digital Editing • 5 Cr.

Course introduces digital non-linear editing software and its use in post-production in digital media creation. Topics include editing and outputting of video and interactive media content for a variety of delivery platforms. Prerequisite: DMA 108 at BC with a C- or better, or instructor permission.

DMA 200 Production Studio II • 5 Cr.

Provides instruction and practical experience with working on collaborative teams to produce digital products for real-world clients for students who have completed their core coursework. Small teams will work with community organizations and non-profit clients to create digital media solutions for their needs as well as materials for student personal portfolios. Prerequisites: DMA 105, DMA 106, DMA 107, DMA 108.

DMA 201 Portfolio and Employment II • 2 Cr.

Industry exploration (from Portfolio & Employment I) is continued and construction of professional employment portfolios is begun by designing, creating, and presenting mid-program digital portfolios and receiving critical feedback. Prerequisite: DMA 100 and DMA 105 at BC with a C- or better, or instructor permission.

DMA 213 Screen Design • 5 Cr.

Examines the principles and elements of design as practiced for computers, mobile devices and other digital displays. Course covers aspects of producing compelling visual interface designs and explores the use of icons, navigation, composition and layout, typography, scalability, and usability. Prerequisite: DMA 100 & 103 at BC with a C- or better, or permission of instructor.

DMA 214 Graphics I • 5 Cr.

Explores current and historical practices for producing images, diagrams, illustrations, textures, and other 2D graphics while working with commercial graphic production software. Students will develop technique and visual problem solving skills while examining the world of graphics. Prerequisite: DMA 100 and 103 at BC with a C- or better, or instructor permission.

DMA 215 Graphics II • 5 Cr.

Further exploration of practices and processes for producing digital images, diagrams, illustrations, textures, and other 2D graphics. Students will further develop their skills for generating graphics for use in a variety of media. Prerequisite: DMA 214 at BC with a C- or better, or permission of instructor.

DMA 221 Web Animation • 5 Cr.

Introduces animation tools such as Flash and builds skills needed to create two-dimensional digital animations and web interfaces. Students work with different animation techniques and interface designs to create finished web accessible animations. Prerequisite: DMA 106 and DMA 107 at BC with C- or better, or entry code.

DMA 230 3-D Animation I • 5 Cr.

Introduces tools and skills needed to create three-dimensional digital animation. Students work with different animation techniques (non-moving, path, cel, layered cel, etc.) and combine sequences with audio to create finished animated objects. Prerequisite: DMA 100 and DMA 106 at BC with a C- or better or instructor permission. DMA 230 replaces DMA 130. Either DMA 230 or DMA 130 may be taken for credit, but not both.

DMA 231 3-D Animation II • 5 Cr.

Students work with character motion and advanced animation techniques. Prerequisite: DMA 130 or 230 at BC with a C- or better, or instructor permission.

DMA 234 Motion Graphics I • 5 Cr.

Introduces the fundamentals of motion graphics. Students gain experience in using basic motion graphics tools and processes to develop simple motion graphics products, and use basic special effects and edit motion graphics pieces to convey message and mood. Prerequisite: DMA 100 and DMA 104 at BC with a C- or better, or instructor permission. DMA 234 replaces DMA 134. Either DMA 234 or DMA 134 may be taken for credit, but not both.

DMA 235 Motion Graphics II • 5 Cr.

Develops knowledge and skills to create professional motion graphics products in a production team environment. Students gain proficiency in the use of basic and advanced features of graphic motion computer tools in order to develop integrated and seamless video products, and create professional broadcast products for specific applications. Prerequisite: DMA 134 or 234 at BC with a C- or better, or instructor permission.

DMA 240 Game Design I • 5 Cr.

Beginning GAME students design and implement their own computer games. Fundamentals of programming and graphic development are covered with respect to game development. Prerequisite: DMA 100 and 106 at BC with a C- or better, or instructor permission.

DMA 241 Game Design II • 5 Cr.

Intermediate GAME students design and implement their own computer games. Intermediate and advanced game development programming and graphics are covered. Prerequisite: DMA 240 at BC with a C- or better, or instructor permission.

DMA 255 Video Production I • 5 Cr.

Continues DMA 108 in a field setting, including intermediate and advanced shooting and editing techniques. Students practice field lighting and audio, production budgeting and planning, script writing, and storyboarding. Student production teams create professional-quality video productions. Prerequisite: DMA 108 at BC with a C- or better, or instructor permission.

DMA 258 Video Studio Production • 5 Cr.

Continues DMA 108 in a video production studio setting. Students learn studio production planning, lighting, and audio along with basic video engineering. Students practice all crew positions, including floor director, camera operator, lighting technician, audio technician, technical director, and program director. Prerequisite: DMA 108 at BC with a C- or better, or instructor permission.

DMA 259 Video Production II • 5 Cr.

Presents production techniques for a variety of video applications, including theatrical, news gathering, informational, and documentary-style productions. Students focus on pre-production planning and executing excellence in their production and post-production processes. Prerequisite: DMA 255 at BC with a C- or better, or instructor permission. Recommended: DMA 258.

DMA 263 Web Design I • 5 Cr.

Students learn to use WYSIWYG web editing tools, such as Dreamweaver or others, to create and manage web sites. Topics include design standards, creating navigation, asset management, ways to customize and extend functionality, and introduces the concepts of dynamic web content and scalability for various devices. Prerequisite: DMA 107 or PROG 109 at BC with a C- or better, or instructor permission. DMA 263 replaces DMA 165. Either DMA 263 or DMA 165 may be taken for credit, but not both.

DMA 264 Web Design II • 5 Cr.

This course teaches the basic principles of usability as it applies to Web design. Students learn the practical knowledge and skills to create a user-centered design, and to conduct usability testing. Emphasis is on strategies to design sites based on user needs, and to develop appropriate testing scenarios. Enforced prerequisite: DMA 263 at BC with a C- or better. DMA 264 replaces DMA 217. Either DMA 264 or DMA 217 may be taken for credit, but not both.

DMA 266 Interactive Gaming for the Web • 5 Cr.

Develop interactive gaming environments for the web. Provides an overview of design for casual internet based games. Includes interface design for 2D games and effective programming practices. Prerequisite: DMA 106 at BC with a C- or better, or entry code.

DMA 271 Production Systems • 4 Cr.

Presents a systematic approach to production management and operations. Students analyze the systems within BC-TV operations and learn to work effectively as production team members. Requires basic word-processing skill. Prerequisite: Acceptance into the Advanced Certificate in Video Production program and permission of the instructor. DMA 271 replaces VIDEO 271. Either DMA 271 or VIDEO 271 may be taken for credit, but not both.

DMA 272 Technical Operation for Video • 4 Cr.

Covers set-up and operation of BC-TV studio and field equipment. Students work with video recorders, audio systems, lighting systems, character generator, field cameras and tripods, and editing systems. Also introduces computer animation program and A/B-roll linear editor. Prerequisite: Acceptance into the Advanced Certificate in Video Production program and permission of the instructor. DMA 272 replaces VIDEO 272. Either DMA 272 or VIDEO 272 may be taken for credit, but not both.

DMA 273 Production Practicum I • 4 Cr.

Gives practical experience as camera operator, audio technician, control room technician, or other crewmembers for designated productions. Students also learn to operate various stations in the Channel 28 head end (including duplication, computer graphics, satellite downlinking). Prerequisite: Acceptance into the Advanced Certificate in Video Production program and permission of the instructor. DMA 273 replaces VIDEO 273. Either DMA 273 or VIDEO 273 may be taken for credit, but not both.

DMA 274 Production Design • 4 Cr.

Presents a systems approach to the production process. Topics include design, treatments, storyboards, publicity, budgets, and scripts, scouting locations and assembling a crew, compiling and analyzing audience profiles, impact, and feedback, increasing audio, video, and post-production values, ethics and integrity. Prerequisite: Acceptance into the Advanced Certificate in Video Production program and permission of the instructor. DMA 274 replaces VIDEO 274. Either DMA 274 or VIDEO 274 may be taken for credit, but not both.

DMA 275 Computer-Video Integration I • 4 Cr.

Covers the operation of computer animation software to create function animations and the use of linear and non-linear editor systems. Prerequisite: Acceptance into the Advanced Certificate in Video Production program and permission of the instructor. DMA 275 replaces VIDEO 275. Either DMA 275 or VIDEO 275 may be taken for credit, but not both.

DMA 276 Production Practicum II • 4 Cr.

Provides experience in editing programs and functioning in crew positions. Students use linear and non-linear editing systems, function as technical director, floor director, and assistant producer or director, organize and operate videoconferences, and create publicity materials using desktop publishing software. Prerequisite: Acceptance into the Advanced Certificate in Video Production program and permission of the instructor. DMA 276 replaces VIDEO 276. Either DMA 276 or VIDEO 276 may be taken for credit, but not both.

DMA 277 Production Management • 4 Cr.

Covers elements of directing fiction and non-fiction programming. Topics include writing scripts and developing characters, staging; camera work, and directing interviews, demonstrations, and commercials. Prerequisite: Acceptance into the Advanced Certificate in Video Production program and permission of the instructor. DMA 277 replaces VIDEO 277. Either DMA 277 or VIDEO 277 may be taken for credit, but not both.

DMA 278 Computer-Video Integration II • 4 Cr.

Covers advanced applications of computer animation programs, word processing programs, and digital video switcher for television and business. Prerequisite: Acceptance into the Advanced Certificate in Video Production program and permission of the instructor. DMA 278 replaces VIDEO 278. Either DMA 278 or VIDEO 278 may be taken for credit, but not both.

DMA 279 Production Practicum III • 4 Cr.

Provides experience in advanced-level production processes. Topics include client interviews, content development and research, audience and purpose, timelines and budgets, production book management, location and studio supervision and direction, post-production requirements, and program evaluation. Prerequisite: Acceptance into the Advanced Certificate in Video Production program and permission of the instructor. DMA 279 replaces VIDEO 279. Either DMA 279 or VIDEO 279 may be taken for credit, but not both.

DMA 280 Production Portfolio • 3 Cr.

Allows students to design resumes and portfolios and develop employment strategies. Students design production resumes, compile and edit resume videotapes, create written resumes, practice job-search networking, and conduct job interviews. Prerequisite: Acceptance into the Advanced Certificate in Video Production program and permission of the instructor. DMA 280 replaces VIDEO 280. Either DMA 280 or VIDEO 280 may be taken for credit, but not both.

DMA 281 Career Preparation • 6 Cr.

Allows students to identify and secure an internship in media production and complete a contract of employment. Prerequisite: Acceptance into the Advanced Certificate in Video Production program and permission of the instructor. DMA 281 replaces VIDEO 281. Either DMA 281 or VIDEO 281 may be taken for credit, but not both.

DMA 282 Production Practicum IV • 3 Cr.

Provides experience on multiple production projects. Students seek out and create projects, work with producers to develop concepts, oversee production quality, and evaluate results and audience feedback. Prerequisite: Acceptance into the Advanced Certificate in Video Production program and permission of the instructor. DMA 282 replaces VIDEO 282. Either DMA 282 or VIDEO 282 may be taken for credit, but not both.

DMA 284 Special Topics in Video • V1-10 Cr.

Covers supplementary or self-supporting courses offered for college credit. Topics are announced in the class schedule. Prerequisite: Acceptance into the Advanced Certificate in Video Production program and permission of the instructor. DMA 284 replaces VIDEO 294. Either DMA 284 or VIDEO 294 may be taken for credit, but not both.

DMA 285 Special Topics in Video • V1-10 Cr.

Covers supplementary or self-supporting courses offered for college credit. Topics are announced in the class schedule. Prerequisite: Acceptance into the Advanced Certificate in Video Production program and permission of the instructor. DMA 285 replaces VIDEO 295. Either DMA 285 or VIDEO 295 may be taken for credit, but not both.

DMA 286 Special Topics in Video • V1-10 Cr.

Covers supplementary or self-supporting courses offered for college credit. Topics are announced in the class schedule. Prerequisite: Acceptance into the Advanced Certificate in Video Production program and permission of the instructor. DMA 286 replaces VIDEO 296. Either DMA 286 or VIDEO 296 may be taken for credit, but not both.

DMA 287 Special Topics in Video • V1-10 Cr.

Covers supplementary or self-supporting courses offered for college credit. Topics are announced in the class schedule. Prerequisite: Acceptance into the Advanced Certificate in Video Production program and permission of the instructor. DMA 287 replaces VIDEO 297. Either DMA 287 or VIDEO 297 may be taken for credit, but not both.

DMA 290 Portfolio Presentation and Review • 1 Cr.

Provides graduating students with the opportunity to present themselves and their portfolios to a panel of industry professionals and/or hiring agents and to receive feedback on their presentation. Students will also provide feedback to peers. Prerequisite: DMA 201 and instructor permission. Course to be taken last quarter prior to graduation.

DMA 291 The Business of Media • 5 Cr.

The business of digital and interactive media is such that it depends on designers and artists who continually evolve with industry trends and technology advances and who often work as independent contractors or as project-based employees. This course explores working as a contractor, running your own business, serial employment, funding and grants, and other aspects of doing business as a media professional. Prerequisite: DMA 100 and 105 with a C- or better. DMA 291 replaces DMA 251.

DMA 292 Internship in Digital Media Arts • 5 Cr.

After securing an internship placement, students gain practical experience within a media production environment while setting learning goals and reflecting on their experience and work readiness. In special circumstances, projects may be approved for groups who are working with an approved client. Instructor permission required. Recommended: DMA 201 and 290. Course is graded C/NC.

DMA 294 Special Topics in Digital Media Arts • V1-10 Cr.

Covers supplementary or self-supporting courses offered for college credit. Topics are announced in the class schedule. Prerequisite: Previous digital media arts enrollment and permission of program chair.

DMA 295 Special Topics in Digital Media Arts • V1-5 Cr.

Covers supplementary or self-supporting courses offered for college credit. Topics are announced in the class schedule. Prerequisite: Previous digital media arts enrollment and permission of program chair.

DMA 296 Special Topics in Digital Media Arts • V1-10 Cr.

Covers supplementary or self-supporting courses offered for college credit. Topics are announced in the class schedule. Prerequisite: Previous digital media arts enrollment and permission of program chair.

DMA 297 Special Topics in Digital Media Arts • V1-10 Cr.

Covers supplementary or self-supporting courses offered for college credit. Topics are announced in the class schedule. Prerequisite: Previous digital media arts enrollment and permission of program chair.

DMA 298 Seminar in Digital Media Arts • V1-5 Cr.

Includes seminars, workshops, etc., offered for college credit. Topics are announced in the class schedule. Prerequisite: Previous digital media arts enrollment and permission of program chair.

DMA 299 Independent Study in Digital Media Arts • V1-10 Cr.

Covers directed reading, special projects, and independent study by an individual student. May be repeated for a maximum of 15 credits. Prerequisite: Completion of 45 credits of Digital Media Arts instruction and permission of instructor.

DOSM 301 Current Topics in Medical Dosimetry • 3 Cr.

Studies the role of the Medical Dosimetrist within a Radiation Oncology Department. Topics include professional issues, treatment planning, dose calculations, imaging, QA and special procedures. Prerequisite: Acceptance into the program.

DOSM 315 Physics for Medical Dosimetry I • 5 Cr.

Explores the fundamentals of radiation therapy physics with special attention to nuclear transformations and decay, x-ray production, radiation generators, interactions of ionizing radiation, x-ray beam quality, measurement of absorbed dose, dose distribution and scatter analysis. Prerequisite: Acceptance into the program.

DOSM 321 Radiation Treatment Planning I • 5 Cr.

Explores treatment planning for 2D planar and 3D conformal therapies. Topics include Isodose pattern assessment, DVH analysis, ICRU definition, Beam modifiers, Photon Monitor Unit calculations, and treatment planning goals for the pelvis, breast, lung, abdomen, head and neck, CNS and metastases. Prerequisite: Acceptance into the program.

DOSM 322 Radiation Treatment Planning II • 5 Cr.

Explores planning techniques for IMRT, SRS, and Special Procedures. Topics include Planning process, Isodose pattern assessment, SRS techniques, new delivery technologies, imaging and fusion, arc therapy, dMLC delivery, and special procedure calculations (TBI, and TSe-). Prerequisite: Acceptance into the program.

DOSM 331 Dosimetry of Particle Beam Therapy • 3 Cr.

Explores treatment planning techniques for electron beam therapy. Topics include clinical usage, treatment applications, energy and field size selection, dose and MU calculations, calculations for and concerns with matching of electron ports, and beam shielding modifying devices. Prerequisite: Acceptance into the program.

DOSM 394 Special Topics in Medical Dosimetry • V1-5 Cr.

Explores issues of special interest to students in medical dosimetry. May be used as continuing education for certified medical dosimetrists. Prerequisite: acceptance into the program.

DOSM 395 Special Topics in Medical Dosimetry • V1-5 Cr.

Explores issues of special interest to students in medical dosimetry. May be used as continuing education for certified medical dosimetrists. Prerequisite: acceptance into the program.

DOSM 396 Special Topics in Medical Dosimetry • V1-5 Cr.

Explores issues of special interest to students in medical dosimetry. May be used as continuing education for certified medical dosimetrists. Prerequisite: acceptance into the program.

DOSM 397 Special Topics in Medical Dosimetry • V1-5 Cr.

Explores issues of special interest to students in medical dosimetry. May be used as continuing education for certified medical dosimetrists. Prerequisite: acceptance into the program.

DOSM 399 Individual Study in Medical Dosimetry • V1-5 Cr.

Covers a variety of topics to acquaint the medical dosimetry student with the role of medical dosimetry in cancer management. Prerequisite: Acceptance into the Medical Dosimetry Program.

DOSM 400 Treatment Planning System Lab • 2 Cr.

Through a series of structured lab exercises, students receive hands-on experience using a Medical Dosimetry Treatment Planning System. Prerequisite: Acceptance into the program.

DOSM 401 Clinical Education I • 8 Cr.

Supervised clinical education in medical dosimetry that progresses through a competency-based educational sequence. Course totals 264 hours. Prerequisite: Acceptance into the program.

DOSM 402 Clinical Education II • 8 Cr.

Supervised clinical education in medical dosimetry that progresses through a competency-based educational sequence. Course totals 264 hours. Prerequisite: Acceptance into the program.

DOSM 403 Clinical Education III • 8 Cr.

Supervised clinical education in medical dosimetry that progresses through a competency-based educational sequence. Course totals 264 hours. Prerequisite: Acceptance into the program.

DOSM 404 Clinical Education IV • 8 Cr.

Supervised clinical education in medical dosimetry that progresses through a competency-based educational sequence. Course totals 264 hours. Prerequisite: Acceptance into the program.

DOSM 405 Clinical Education V • 8 Cr.

Supervised clinical education in medical dosimetry that progresses through a competency-based educational sequence. Course totals 264 hours. Prerequisite: Acceptance into the program.

DOSM 406 Clinical Education VI • 5 Cr.

Supervised clinical education in medical dosimetry that progresses through a competency-based educational sequence. Course totals 165 hours. Prerequisite: Acceptance into the program.

DOSM 442 Brachytherapy for Medical Dosimetrists • 4 Cr.

Examines treatment planning techniques for both LDR and HDR brachytherapy. Topics include radioactive source characteristics, calculation of dose distributions, imaging requirements, systems of implant dosimetry and treatment planning goals across various anatomical sites. Prerequisite: Acceptance into the program.

DOSM 443 Quality Assurance for Medical Dosimetry • 3 Cr.

Examines the components of a quality assurance program within Medical Dosimetry. Topics include quality assurance of a treatment planning system, patient records and data, role and process of plan verification, and quality assurance recommendations from outside agencies. Prerequisite: Acceptance into the program.

DOSM 475 Concept Integration and Case Studies • 3 Cr.

Preparation for the Certification Exam issued by the Medical Dosimetry Certification Board (MDCB) through a comprehensive examination of coursework and student case presentations based on MDCB content specification. Prerequisite: Acceptance into the program.

DRMA& 101 Introduction to the Theatre • 5 Cr.

Explores the theatre experience from a variety of perspectives, including the audience, the playwright, the actor, the designer, and the director. Attendance required at one on campus performance.

DRMA 106 History of Musical Theatre • 5 Cr.

Traces the development of the American Musical from its roots to the newest musicals on and off Broadway including vaudeville, tap shows, classic musicals, rock musicals, through-sung musicals, and the trend setting and trend breaking shows of every era. Covers script (book), dance, music, production, thematic material, and the cultural context in which each show was written. Lectures, films, CD's, scripts and a text will be used.

DRMA 141 Playwriting I • 5 Cr.

Introduction to the art and craft of writing plays. Through written exercises, readings and discussions, students write their own scenes and begin work on short plays. Covers dialogue, character, relationships, plots, and conflict. Designed for those interested in writing for the stage or screen. Recommended: Placement in ENGL& 101.

DRMA 151 Basic Acting Fundamentals • 5 Cr.

Introduces the basic techniques and tools used by the actor. Moving from improvisation to scene work, students learn warm ups, theatre games, vocal physical and emotional awareness, listening skills, and beginning textual analysis using objectives, obstacles and tactics.

DRMA 154 Musical Theatre Acting Fundamentals • 3 Cr.

Introduces acting in musical theatre. Practical application of basic acting techniques for playing objectives and developing character are used to combine music, lyrics and written word into performance. Solos, duets and group scenes and songs are explored.

DRMA 155 Improvisation • 3 Cr.

Games, exercise and warm ups are used to build the skills needed in individual and group improvisations. Practical application emphasizes team building and the basic structure and format of a comic sketch.

DRMA 159 Basic Acting Movement • 3 Cr.

Concentrates on tuning the actor's body. Students gain fluidity, flexibility, and strength as they use their bodies to create character and define space. Students practice dramatic situations incorporating character work and strenuous physical activity. Same as PE 159. Either DRMA 159 or PE 159 may be taken for credit, not both.

DRMA 161 Acting for Film & Media • 5 Cr.

Introduces acting techniques as applied to film and other media. Students become comfortable in front of a lens and learn to convey on-camera believability. Shot styles include masters, two shots, over-the-shoulders, and close-ups. Students also take roles behind the camera.

DRMA 200 Drama Colloquium • 3 Cr.

Offers an in-depth analysis of the history and literature of the period for BC's annual drama production. Format includes discussion with the director, designers, and technical director of the production.

DRMA 210 Scene Technology • 4 Cr.

Presents theories and techniques of set and property construction and painting. Intensive lecture/lab format. Prerequisite: Concurrent enrollment in DRMA 290.

DRMA 212 Stage Lighting • 4 Cr.

Presents basic theories, techniques, and equipment in theater lighting. Intensive lecture/lab format. Prerequisite: Concurrent enrollment in DRMA 290.

DRMA 215 Scene Design • 4 Cr.

Introduction to set design. Students explore dramatic metaphor and the tangible execution of aesthetic. Students explicate dramatic texts, conceptualize scenic designs, draft working schematics and build models. Students collaborate and present their designs to the class.

DRMA 224 Theatre History • 5 Cr.

Introduces students to some of the greatest plays in the Western theater tradition from the Ancient Greeks through the 19th century. Theatrical conventions demonstrated in each major period are studied. The relationship between play-writing and playmaking is explored.

DRMA 230 Audition Technique • 2 Cr.

xploration and practice techniques and materials required to audition for plays, musicals, and advanced theatre programs. May be repeated up to 6 credits.

DRMA 241 Playwriting II • 5 Cr.

More advanced work in the art and craft of writing plays. Students will work on at least 20 pages of a one act or full length play. Through written exercises, readings and discussions, students will share their work and actively participate in a workshop process for the playwright. Prerequisite: DRMA 141 or permission of instructor. Recommended: Placement in ENGL& 101.

DRMA 251 Acting Contemporary Scene Study • 5 Cr.

Acting training based on preparation of scene work in the context of the entire play. Students rehearse and perform scenes chosen from contemporary theater plays. A variety of acting methods are studied. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor and/or audition.

Description starting Summer 2018

Acting training based on preparation of scene work in the context of the entire play. Students rehearse and perform scenes chosen from contemporary theater plays. A variety of acting methods are studied. Prerequisite: DRMA 151 with a C or better, or permission of instructor.

DRMA 252 Advanced Acting Classical Scene Study • 5 Cr.

Examines scenes from Classical theater. Students rehearse and perform selected scenes in class. Prerequisite: DRMA 251.

Description starting Summer 2018

Examines scenes from Classical theater. Students rehearse and perform selected scenes in class. Prerequisite: DRMA 251 with a C or better.

DRMA 254 Musical Theatre Scene Study • 3 Cr.

Continues skill building in the art and craft of acting in musical theatre. Practical application of singing and acting to perform scenes, songs, and duets from musical theatre are highlighted. Duets and through sung scene work will be highlighter. Prerequisite: DRMA 154 or permission of instructor. Recommended: DRMA 251.

DRMA 256 Shakespearean Scene Study • 3 Cr.

Introduces the student actor to the plays of William Shakespeare. Modern acting practices are combined with various specific techniques of interpreting and applying Shakespeare's language to the stage. Recommended: DRMA 251.

DRMA 270 Directing • 3 Cr.

Theory and practice of stage direction including selection of play, casting and staging. Production of a scene for public performance is required. Recommended: ENGL& 101 placement.

DRMA 280 Studio Theater I • 5 Cr.

All students are cast in the studio theater production. Students analyze, prepare, rehearse and perform a play. Provides practical experience in rehearsal and performance. Lecture/lab format. May be repeated for a maximum of 30 credits. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.

DRMA 281 Studio Theater II • V1-5 Cr.

All students are cast in the Studio Theater Production. Students analyze, prepare, rehearse and perform a play. Students also participate in cast leadership responsibilities. Provides practical experience in rehearsal and performance. May be repeated for a maximum of 10 credits. Prerequisite: DRMA 280 and permission of instructor.

DRMA 284 Musical Theatre Performance I • 5 Cr.

Offers in-depth analysis of, and performance opportunity in, a musical theatre production. All students are cast in the musical. Lecture/lab format. May be repeated for a maximum of 30 credits. Prerequisite: permission of instructor.

DRMA 285 Musical Theatre Performance II • V1-5 Cr.

All students cast in the musical cover in-depth analysis of, and performance in the musical theatre production. Lecture/lab format. May be repeated for a maximum of 30 credits. Required for students cast in musical production. Prerequisite: permission of instructor.

DRMA 290 Technical Practice • 1 Cr.

Provides stage or light crew component of DRMA 210 or 212. Requires a minimum of 33 hours of backstage work on the studio theater production. Prerequisite: Concurrent enrollment in DRMA 210 or DRMA 212.

DRMA 291 Theater Performance • 5 Cr.

Provides practical hands-on experience in theater production. Students work on the yearly main stage shows or on special projects for studio productions. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.

DRMA 294 Special Topics in Theatre Art • V1-5 Cr.

Allows focused study of topics supplementing the Theatre Arts curriculum. Topics are announced in the class schedule. May be repeated for a maximum of 10 credits.

DRMA 295 Special Topics in Theatre Art • V1-5 Cr.

Allows focused study of topics supplementing the Theatre Arts curriculum. Topics are announced in the class schedule. May be repeated for a maximum of 10 credits.

DRMA 296 Special Topics in Theatre Art • V1-5 Cr.

Allows focused study of topics supplementing the Theatre Arts curriculum. Topics are announced in the class schedule. May be repeated for a maximum of 10 credits.

DRMA 297 Special Topics in Theatre Art • V1-5 Cr.

Allows focused study of topics supplementing the Theatre Arts curriculum. Topics are announced in the class schedule. May be repeated for a maximum of 10 credits.

DRMA 299 Individual Research • V1-5 Cr.

Covers individual study in some aspect of drama. Topics include acting, stage, costumes, lighting, publicity, playwriting, or directing. May be repeated for a maximum of 15 credits. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.

DUTEC 100 Introduction to Diagnostic Medical Sonography • 3 Cr.

This course will introduce the student to the field of diagnostic medical sonography. Topics include the history and foundations of medical ultrasound; medical terminology; relevant ergonomics; and the role of sonography compared to other Imaging disciplines. Professionalism, communication, patient care, vitals, medical ethics, legal issues, scope of practice, certification, and accreditation are addressed. Prerequisite: Acceptance into program.

DUTEC 102 Practical Aspects of Sonography • 3 Cr.

This course will introduce the student to the principles of Diagnostic Medical Sonography, scanning techniques, image critique, image identification; patient care and preparation as related to the sonography exam. Introduction to the operation of diagnostic ultrasound equipment and routine scanning protocols will provide a foundation for future scanning courses. Prerequisite: Acceptance into program.

DUTEC 105 Pathophysiology I • 3 Cr.

Introduces pathogenesis: the sequence of events in the development of a disease. Students focus on pathological conditions affecting the abdomen and identifiable with diagnostic imaging techniques. An extensive review of normal physiology is also presented. Prerequisite: BIOL& 241 (prev BIOL 260) and BIOL& 242 and acceptance into the program or permission of program chair.

DUTEC 106 Pathophysiology II • 3 Cr.

Continues upon Pathophysiology I emphasizing the physiology and pathology of the cardiovascular and the peripheral vascular system. Prerequisite: DUTEC 105 or permission of program chair.

DUTEC 107 Human Cross-Sectional Anatomy • 7 Cr.

Covers the human anatomy from the cross-sectional perspective in longitudinal, transverse, coronal, and oblique planes. Students analyze correlations with clinical diagnostic imaging techniques. Prerequisite: Acceptance into program or permission of program chair.

DUTEC 110 Abdominal Scanning and Techniques • 5 Cr.

Presents basic concepts and terminology, as well as scanning protocols for the ultrasound examination of the abdomen. Topics include both normal and pathological states. Prerequisite: Acceptance into program or permission of program chair.

DUTEC 112 Pathophysiology III • 3 Cr.

Continues upon Pathophysiology II and focuses on the disease process and disease states relevant to obstetrics, gynecology, and neurology. Prerequisite: DUTEC 106 or permission of program chair.

DUTEC 113 Pathophysiology IV • 3 Cr.

Continues Pathophysiology III, emphasizing the physiology and the pathology of the cardiovascular and cerebral vascular system. Prerequisite: DUTEC 105, and DUTEC 106 and DUTEC 112 and acceptance into program or permission of program chair.

DUTEC 120 Obstetrics and Gynecological Sonography • 5 Cr.

Presents current theory and scanning techniques for medical sonographers, focusing on obstetrics and gynecology procedures and pathologies. Prerequisite: Acceptance into program or permission of program chair.

DUTEC 125 Congenital Heart Disease • 3 Cr.

This course will introduce the student to embryologic development of the heart and great vessels. Emphasis will be placed on normal development and congenital heart disease. Echocardiography will be introduced as well as specific imaging protocols, trends, and techniques that will used with the pediatric patient. Prerequisite: Acceptance into program or permission of program chair.

DUTEC 130 Small Parts with Vasculature Sonography • 3 Cr.

Presents the anatomy and pathophysiology of small human body parts. Intraoperative scanning focuses on surgical procedures. Prerequisite: Acceptance into program or permission of program chair.

DUTEC 135 General Ultrasound Lab • 3 Cr.

Introduces knob ology and annotation for state-of-art diagnostic ultrasound equipment and prepares student for hands-on live scanning. Prerequisite: Acceptance into program or permission of program chair.

DUTEC 137 Echocardiography Lab I • 3 Cr.

Introduces knobology and annotation for state-of-art diagnostic ultrasound equipment and prepares student for hands-on live scanning. Prerequisite: Acceptance into program or permission of program chair.

DUTEC 145 General Ultrasound Lab II • 4 Cr.

Introduces hands-on live scanning experience in the student's clinical specialty area. Prerequisite: Acceptance into program or permission of program chair.

DUTEC 146 Vascular Lab I • 4 Cr.

Introduces hands-on live scanning experience in the area of vascular technology. Prerequisite: Acceptance into the program or permission of program chair.

DUTEC 147 Echocardiography Scanning Lab II • 4 Cr.

Continuation of hands-on live scanning experience in the student's clinical specialty area. A lecture series is included with this course. Prerequisite: Acceptance into program or permission of program chair.

DUTEC 150 Basic Echocardiography • 4 Cr.

Covers basic ultrasound scanning techniques of the heart. Students focus on anatomy, physiology, pathology, and echocardiographic pattern recognition. Prerequisite: Acceptance into program or permission of program chair.

DUTEC 155 Echocardiography • 5 Cr.

Continues basic echocardiography. Students concentrate on Doppler echocardiographic techniques and congenital heart disease as relating to the practice of adult echocardiography. Prerequisite: Acceptance into program or permission of program chair.

DUTEC 160 Vascular Ultrasound Technology • 3 Cr.

Presents current theory and scanning techniques for medical sonographers. Students learn Doppler techniques used to diagnose peripheral vascular and cerebral vascular disease. Prerequisite: Acceptance into program or permission of program chair.

DUTEC 165 General Ultrasound Lab III • 3 Cr.

Provides hands-on ultrasound scanning experience in the student's clinical specialty area. Competency is required before beginning the clinical practicum. Prerequisite: Acceptance into program or permission of program chair.

DUTEC 166 Vascular Technology Lab II • 3 Cr.

Provides hands-on ultrasound scanning experience in vascular technology. Competency of a variety of scanning procedures must be demonstrated before beginning the clinical practicum. Prerequisite: Acceptance into program or permission of program chair.

DUTEC 167 Echocardiography Scanning Lab III • 3 Cr.

Provides hands-on ultrasound scanning experience in adult echocardiography. A lecture series is included with this course. Competency of a variety of scanning procedures must be demonstrated before beginning the clinical practicum. Prerequisite: Acceptance into program or permission of program chair.

DUTEC 170 Ultrasound Physics & Instrumentation I • 3 Cr.

Covers acoustical physics, including heat energy, light and sound, wave theory, reflection, refraction, resonance, tissue interaction, transducers, bioeffects, and computers in ultrasonics. Prerequisite: Acceptance into program or permission of program chair.

DUTEC 171 Ultrasound Physics & Instrumentation II • 3 Cr.

Continues DUTEC 170. Topics include Doppler effect, Doppler techniques, acoustic power, fluid dynamics, and quality assurance procedures. Prerequisite: Acceptance into program or permission of program chair.

DUTEC 180 Advanced Studies Obstetrics • 3 Cr.

Examines issues relating to the clinical practicum in abdominal and obstetrics/gynecology. Prerequisite: Acceptance into program or permission of program chair.

DUTEC 181 Advanced Studies Echocardiography • 3 Cr.

Examines issues relating to the clinical practicum in echocardiology and vascular technology. Prerequisite: Acceptance into program, or permission of program chair.

DUTEC 182 Advanced Studies Vascular Technology • 3 Cr.

Continues the vascular application of grayscale, color flow and Doppler sonography for the detection of peripheral vascular (PV) disease in the lower extremities and upper extremities. Includes PV arterial and venous anatomy, physiology, disease and treatment. Advanced concepts in trans-cranial Doppler will be revealed. Prerequisite: Acceptance into program or permission of program chair.

DUTEC 190 Pediatric Echocardiography • 3 Cr.

This course continues the basic echocardiography started in DUTEC 125. Students focus Doppler measurements and calculations, M-mode and two-dimensional imaging in conjunction with the targeted obstetric exam and fetal interventions with congenital heart disease. Prerequisite: Acceptance into program or permission of program chair.

DUTEC 200 Stress, EKG and Auscultation for Echo • 4 Cr.

This course covers cardiac electrical activity and the interpretation of electrocardiograms. The student echocardiographer develops skill in recognizing normal sinus rhythm versus atypical cardiac rhythms. Students learn to interpret common cardiac dysrhythmias, including sinus, atrial, junctional, and ventricular, and integrate this skill into the daily practice of echocardiography. The students will know the stress echo lab procedures including monitoring the patient. Students will learn to perform auscultation of the heart and lungs. Prerequisite: Acceptance into program, completion of DUTEC 155.

DUTEC 210 Clinical Practicum I • 13 Cr.

Provides clinical experience in an ultrasound department under the supervision of a sonographer. Prerequisite: Acceptance into program and completion of all prerequisite coursework with a grade of C or better.

DUTEC 220 Clinical Practicum II • 13 Cr.

Provides additional clinical experience in an ultrasound department under the supervision of a sonographer. Prerequisite: Acceptance into program, completion of all prerequisite course work with a grade of C or better, and DUTEC 210.

DUTEC 230 Clinical Practicum III • 13 Cr.

Provides additional clinical experience in an ultrasound department under the supervision of a sonographer. Prerequisite: Acceptance into program, completion of all prerequisite coursework with a grade of C or better, and DUTEC 210 and DUTEC 220.

DUTEC 240 Clinical Practicum IV • 13 Cr.

Provides additional clinical experience in an ultrasound department under the supervision of a sonographer. Prerequisite: Acceptance into program, completion of all prerequisite coursework with a grade of C or better, and DUTEC 210, DUTEC 220, and DUTEC 230.

DUTEC 269 Physics Review • 2 Cr.

Prepares student for certification exams by reviewing physics and ultrasound instrumentation. Students focus on mathematical analysis and physics theories. Prerequisite: Acceptance into program or permission of program chair.

DUTEC 296 Special Topics-Vascular Technology • 3 Cr.

No class description found.

DUTEC 299 Individual Studies in Diagnostic Ultrasound • V1-12 Cr.

Provides clinical experience in a diagnostic imaging facility under the direction of a medical sonographer, doctor of medicine or osteopathy, or associate research fellow. Prerequisite: Permission of program chair.

ECED& 100 Child Care Basics • 3 Cr.

Designed to meet licensing requirements for early learning lead teachers and family home child care providers, STARS 30 hour basics course recognized in the MERIT system. Topics: child growth/development, cultural competency, community resource, guidance, health/safety/nutrition and professional practice. Previously ECED 170. Either ECED 170 or ECED& 100 may be taken for credit, but not both.

ECED& 105 Introduction to Early Childhood Education • 5 Cr.

Explore the foundations of early childhood education. Examine theories defining the field, issues and trends, best practices, and program models. Observe children, professionals, and programs in action. Previously ECED 171.Either ECED 171 or ECED& 105 may be taken for credit, but not both.

ECED& 107 Health, Safety, and Nutrition • 5 Cr.

Develop knowledge and skills to ensure good health, nutrition, and safety of children in group care and education programs. Recognize the signs of abuse and neglect, responsibilities for mandated reporting, and available community resources. Previously ECED 204. Either ECED 204 or ECED& 107 may be taken for credit, but not both.

ECED& 120 Practicum-Nurturing Relationships • 2 Cr.

In an early learning setting apply best practice for engaging nurturing relationships with children. Focus on keeping children healthy and safe while promoting growth and development. Format includes laboratory participation. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.

ECED& 132 Infants/Toddlers Care • 3 Cr.

Examine the unique developmental needs of infants and toddlers. Study the role of the caregiver, relationships with families, developmentally appropriate practices, nurturing environments for infants and toddlers, and culturally relevant care. Previously ECED 180. Either ECED 180 or ECED& 132 may be taken for credit, but not both.

ECED& 160 Curriculum Development • 5 Cr.

Investigate learning theory, program planning, and tools for curriculum development promoting language, fine/gross motor, social-emotional, cognitive and creative skills, and growth in young children (birth-age 8). Format includes laboratory participation. Previously ECED 181. Either ECED 181 or ECED& 160 may be taken for credit, but not both.

ECED& 170 Environments for Young Children • 3 Cr.

Design, evaluate, and improve indoor and outdoor environments which ensure quality learning, nurturing experiences, and optimize the development of young children.

ECED& 180 Language and Literacy Development • 3 Cr.

Develop teaching strategies for language acquisition and literacy skill development at each developmental stage (birth-age 8) through the four interrelated areas of speaking, listening, writing, and reading. Previously EDUC 150. Either EDUC 150 or ECED& 180 may be taken for credit, but not both.

ECED& 190 Observation and Assessment • 3 Cr.

Collect and record observation of and assessment data on young children in order to plan for and support the child, the family, the group and the community. Practice reflection techniques, summarizing conclusions and communicating findings.

ECED 191 Early Childhood Education Practicum I • 5 Cr.

Design, plan, and evaluate curriculum for young children. Related topics include: lesson planning, environmental arrangement, the appropriate use of learning materials, and making positive connections with young children. Includes nine hours per week of supervised laboratory participation. Prerequisite: Conversational English and permission of instructor. Recommended: EDUC& 130, ECED& 160, ECED& 170.

ECED 192 Early Childhood Education Practicum II • 5 Cr.

Develop and implement a research project applied to an early childhood setting, and create a professional teaching portfolio. Related topics include: activity planning, developing teaching resources, and making positive connections with young children. Includes nine hours per week of supervised laboratory participation. Prerequisite: Permission of Instructor. Recommended: Conversational English and EDUC& 130, ECED& 160, ECED& 170, ECED 191.

ECED 198 Special Seminar in Early Childhood Education • V1-5 Cr.

Allows study of special topics related to early childhood education. Topics are announced in the class schedule. May be repeated for a maximum of 15 credits.

Description starting Summer 2018

Allows study of special topics related to early childhood education. Topics are announced in the class schedule. May be repeated for a maximum of 15 credits. Grading: Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory.

ECED 199 Independent Studies in Early Childhood Education • V1-5 Cr.

Covers special projects or supervised independent study by an individual student. May be repeated for a maximum of 15 credits. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.

ECED 295 Special Topics in Early Childhood Education • V1-5 Cr.

Allows in-depth study or approved work experience in the field of early childhood education. May be repeated for a maximum of 15 credits.

ECED 296 Special Seminar in Early Childhood Education • 5 Cr.

Allows study of special topics related to early childhood education. Topics are announced in the class schedule. May be repeated for a maximum of 15 credits. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.

ECED 298 Special Seminar in Early Childhood Education • V1-5 Cr.

Allows study of special topics related to early childhood education. Topics are announced in the class schedule. May be repeated for a maximum of 15 credits.

ECED 299 Independent Studies in Early Childhood Education • V1-5 Cr.

Covers special projects or supervised independent study by an individual student. May be repeated for a maximum of 15 credits. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.

ECON 100 Introduction to Basic Economic Principles • 5 Cr.

Introduces the concepts and tools of economic thinking. Students learn to understand and evaluate the complex economic problems encountered in modern society. Business and Economics majors who plan to transfer to a 4-year institution should generally take ECON& 201 or ECON& 202 rather than ECON 100.

ECON 194 Special Topics in Economics • V1-10 Cr.

Covers supplementary or unusual classes related to the field. Topics are announced in the class schedule.

ECON 195 Special Topics in Economics • V1-10 Cr.

Covers supplementary or unusual classes related to the field. Topics are announced in the class schedule.

ECON 196 Special Topics in Economics • V1-10 Cr.

Covers supplementary or unusual classes related to the field. Topics are announced in the class schedule.

ECON 197 Special Topics in Economics • V1-10 Cr.

Covers supplementary or unusual classes related to the field. Topics are announced in the class schedule.

ECON 198 Seminar in Economics • V1-10 Cr.

Includes seminars, workshops, etc., for which college credit is offered.

ECON 199 Individual Studies in Economics • V1-10 Cr.

Covers directed readings, special projects, and independent study by an individual student. May be repeated for a maximum of 15 credits. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.

ECON& 201 Microeconomics • 5 Cr.

Investigates the responses of individual economic agents to incentives. This course provides the framework for analyzing simple models of choices for individual markets and industries within a mixed economy. The structure and outcomes of the basic model can then be modified to analyze a variety of market structures and be used to address a range of social issues, using the common policy goals of efficiency and equity. Recommended: MATH 099 or higher, and ENGL& 101 or higher.

ECON& 202 Macroeconomics • 5 Cr.

Presents major theories of business cycles and economic growth. Students examine economic policies aimed "at price stability" and unemployment in an industrialized capitalist nation as well as factors in international trade and monetary flows. It may also cover the development policies of underdeveloped countries. Recommended: MATH 099 or higher, and ENGL& 101 or higher

ECON 250 Economics of Sustainability • 5 Cr.

Study issues of environmental, resource and sustainable economics using basic economic principles. Topics include: economics of renewable resources, full-cost accounting, natural capital and social capital, international environmental trade and regulation, and ecological economics. Explore how sustainability economics can be integrated in corporate financial analysis and inform decision-making at all levels. Recommended: 30 prior college credits.

ECON 260 Economic Development of the U.S. • 5 Cr.

Analyzes the industrialization and transformation of the U.S. economy from colonial times to the present. Students examine the rapid changes after the Civil War and the Great Depression, as well as the contributions of immigrants and native groups. Same as CES 260. Either ECON 260 or CES 260 may be taken for credit, not both. Recommended: 30 prior college credits.

ECON 294 Special Topics in Economics • V1-10 Cr.

Covers supplementary or unusual classes related to the field. Topics are announced in the class schedule.

ECON 295 Special Topics in Economics • V1-10 Cr.

Covers supplementary or unusual classes related to the field. Topics are announced in the class schedule.

ECON 296 Special Topics in Economics • V1-10 Cr.

Covers supplementary or unusual classes related to the field. Topics are announced in the class schedule.

ECON 297 Special Topics in Economics • V1-10 Cr.

Covers supplementary or unusual classes related to the field. Topics are announced in the class schedule.

ECON 298 Seminar in Economics • V1-10 Cr.

Includes seminars, workshops, etc., for which college credit is offered.

ECON 299 Individual Studies in Economics • V1-10 Cr.

Covers directed readings, special projects, and independent study by an individual student. May be repeated for a maximum of 15 credits. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.

ECON 315 Economics of Healthcare • 5 Cr.

Covers the principles of micro and macroeconomics as applied to the healthcare industry. Examines how healthcare demand differs from that of other goods. Major topic areas include identifying and measuring the cost and benefit of marketing and government solutions to various healthcare issues, the role risk plays in the demand for and supply of health insurance, the incorporation of general healthcare, medical care, government policies and health insurance in determining impacts on private profit and social economic well-being. Prerequisite: Acceptance to program or permission of the instructor.

ECON 400 Econometrics • 5 Cr.

This course introduces Econometric methods used in economics, business, finance, marketing, management and other disciplines, with emphasis on practical use and application. Students will construct models using real-world empirical data, conduct hypothesis testing, forecast outcomes, and learn to estimate and interpret the parameters of models. Prerequisite: MATH 342 with a C or better, and acceptance into BAS Data Analytics program, or permission of the instructor.

EDUC& 115 Child Development • 5 Cr.

Build a functional understanding of the foundation of child development from conception through adolescence. Observe and document physical, social, emotional, and cognitive development of children, reflective of cross cultural and global perspectives.

EDUC& 130 Guiding Behavior • 3 Cr.

Examine the principles and theories promoting social competence in young children and creating safe learning environments. Develop skills promoting effective interactions, providing positive individual guidance, and enhancing group experiences.

EDUC& 150 Child, Family, Community • 3 Cr.

Integrate the family and community contexts in which a child develops. Explore cultures and demographics of families in society, community resources, strategies for involving families in the education of their child, and tools for effective communication. Previously ECED 201. Either ECED 201 or EDUC& 150 may be taken for credit, but not both.

EDUC& 204 Exceptional Child • 5 Cr.

Examines the educational, social, and developmental patterns of children and youth aged 0-21 years with exceptionalities. Students explore the impact of exceptionalities on children, their families and on their futures. Includes information about federal and state legislation and programs designed for children with special needs.

EDUC& 205 Introduction to Education with Field Experience • 5 Cr.

Details the history, development, purposes, and processes of education. Students examine the teaching-learning process. Format includes lecture, discussion, and lab.

EDUC 240 Culture & Human Diversity in Education • 3 Cr.

Focus on concepts, theories, and strategies that constitute major dimensions of a culturally relevant anti-bias curriculum for early childhood and elementary education classrooms.

Description starting Summer 2018

Students will explore diversity and social justice issues influencing educational settings. Students will examine in depth the historical and current impact of children's, teachers' and families' cultural, social and political contexts in schools.

EDUC 281 Special Topics for Educators • V1-5 Cr.

Allows specialized or in-depth study of subjects supplementing the field of education.

EDUC 282 Special Topics for Educators • V1-5 Cr.

Allows specialized or in-depth study of subjects supplementing the field of education.

EDUC 283 Special Topics for Educators • V1-5 Cr.

Allows specialized or in-depth study of subjects supplementing the field of education.

EDUC 284 Special Topics for Educators • V1-5 Cr.

Allows specialized or in-depth study of subjects supplementing the field of education.

EDUC 294 Special Topics in Education • V1-5 Cr.

Allows in-depth study or approved work experience in the field of education. May be repeated for a maximum of 15 credits.

EDUC 295 Special Topics in Education • V1-5 Cr.

Allows in-depth study or approved work experience in the field of education. May be repeated for a maximum of 15 credits.

EDUC 296 Special Topics in Education • V1-5 Cr.

Allows in-depth study or approved work experience in the field of education. May be repeated for a maximum of 15 credits.

EDUC 297 Special Topics in Education • V1-5 Cr.

Allows in-depth study or approved work experience in the field of education. May be repeated for a maximum of 15 credits.

ELENG 021 English Conversation 1 • V1-3.6 Cr.

Designed to help non-native English speakers function more easily in their everyday lives in the community. Conversation skills are practiced with attention given to vocabulary building, pronunciation and listening.

ELENG 022 English Conversation 2 • V1-3.6 Cr.

Designed to help non-native English speakers function more easily in their everyday lives in the community. Conversation skills are practiced with attention given to vocabulary building, pronunciation, and listening.

ELENG 031 Vocabulary In Use • V1-1.8 Cr.

Designed to assist non-native English speakers in expanding their English vocabulary. Students discuss techniques for remembering new vocabulary, use textbook exercises to enforce understanding and memory, and use outside readings to test vocabulary knowledge. Students can take Vocabulary in Use I or Vocabulary in Use II in any order.

ELENG 041 Grammar Review 1 • V1-3.6 Cr.

Designed for ESL students who have already studied English in their native countries, and who wish to review the basics of the English language.

ELENG 042 Grammar Review 2 • V1-3.6 Cr.

Designed for intermediate to advanced ESL students who have already studied English in their native countries, and who wish to review the basics of the English language.

ELENG 043 Grammar Review 3 • V1-1.8 Cr.

Designed for intermediate to advanced ESL students who have already studied English in their native countries, and who wish to review the basics of the English language.

ELENG 045 Slang • V1-2.5 Cr.

Designed to promote understanding of slang and idiomatic expressions in a fun and interactive way. Students learn to recognize expressions both in oral and written form and to express thoughts and ideas using these expressions. Students practice expressions through a variety of expressions including role-play, small group discussion and watching videos.

ELENG 046 Understanding Informal English • V1-1.3 Cr.

No class description found.

ELENG 052 Everyday Idioms and Expressions • V1-0.9 Cr.

Designed to teach students informal everyday speech used by native speakers in the U.S.

ELENG 061 Reading and Writing for Pleasure • V1-2.7 Cr.

Designed for intermediate and above students who wish to improve their reading comprehension and writing ability for everyday use.

ELENG 062 English Through Current Events • V1-1.8 Cr.

Covers current topics in Time or Newsweek magazine. Each week, students are expected to read two assigned articles and come ready to take part in discussions of those topics and related issues. the instructor chooses the articles and makes copies for the students. There is no reason to purchase either magazine.

ELENG 063 English Through the Media • V1-2.7 Cr.

Based on instruction from and discussion of excerpts from media broadcasts as well as from students' interests. It gives students a chance to explore cultural and social issues while studying English. This lively exchange of ideas is open to all non-native English speakers of intermediate level or above.

ELENG 081 TOEFL Preparation • V1-3.6 Cr.

TOEFL Prep is designed to provide instruction and intensive drill in the four main skills tested on the new, computer-based TOEFL. Differences between the traditional paper and pencil TOEFL and the computerized TOEFL will be discussed.

ELI 000 ELI BLOCK CLASSES • 0 Cr.

No class description found.

ELISP 011 Accent Reduction • V1-1.8 Cr.

Designed for mid to high level non-native speakers of English who want to reduce their accent and develop confidence in speaking with native English speakers. It focuses on the most distinctive sound patterns of English: stress, intonation, and rhythm. Students learning English for the first time should take Pronunciation, not Accent Reduction.

ELISP 021 Oral Office Communication • V1-3.6 Cr.

Designed to improve the spoken job performance of non-native English speaking employees. It focuses on developing formal and informal presentation skills, effective telephone techniques and interpersonal communication strategies appropriate to the business environment.

ELITP 055 TOEFL Preparation - UP • V1-4 Cr.

No class description found.

ELIUP 001 Reading • 4.5 Cr.

No class description found.

ELIUP 002 Speaking and Listening • 4.5 Cr.

No class description found.

ELIUP 003 Writing • 9 Cr.

No class description found.

ELIUP 004 University Prep-HOLD • 17.5 Cr.

No class description found.

ELIUP 031 Writing Level I • 4.5 Cr.

Introduction and practice of sentence structure, question patterns, verb tenses, and parts of speech. Students practice academic and creative writing assignments focusing on the sentence, and learn and practice the writing process. Course is linked with ELIUP 032. Prerequisite: Acceptance to the ELI program.

ELIUP 032 Grammar Level I • 4.5 Cr.

Introduction to and practice of sentence structure, question patterns, verb tenses, and parts of speech. Course is linked with ELIUP 031. Prerequisite: Acceptance to the ELI program.

ELIUP 033 Reading I • 4.5 Cr.

Students learn to scan, locate specific information, improve comprehension, make connections between sounds and letters, build vocabulary, and use a dictionary. Prerequisite: Acceptance to the ELI program.

ELIUP 034 Speaking & Listening I • 4.5 Cr.

Students learn and practice using grammatical language in everyday situations, give and follow directions, ask for clarification, and apply appropriate vocabulary. Minimal pairs, intonation patterns and present and past tense verb endings are emphasized. Prerequisite: Acceptance to the ELI program.

ELIUP 041 Writing Level II • 4.5 Cr.

Students learn and practice more difficult sentence structures, verb tenses, modals, comparatives, adverbs of manner, and the usage of determiners and modifiers with nouns. Writing instruction emphasizes organization, transitions, examples and details, and topic sentences. Students begin to develop paragraphs. Course is linked with ELIUP 042. Prerequisite: Acceptance to the ELI program.

ELIUP 042 Grammar Level II • 4.5 Cr.

Students learn and practice more difficult sentence structures, verb tenses, modals, comparatives, adverbs of manner, and the usage of determiners and modifiers with nouns. Course is linked with ELIUP 041. Prerequisite: Acceptance to the ELI program.

ELIUP 043 Reading II • 4.5 Cr.

Students learn and practice scanning, skimming, locating main ideas, making basic inferences based on given information. In addition, they build passive and active vocabularies, guess vocabulary from context, and develop study skills. Prerequisite: Acceptance to the ELI program.

ELIUP 044 Speaking & Listening II • 4.5 Cr.

Continuation of work begun in Level 1. Students improve their ability to express themselves in formal and informal situations. There is a balance between speaking and listening during class. Prerequisite: Acceptance to the ELI program.

ELIUP 051 Writing Level III • 4.5 Cr.

Students master control of basic verb tenses in increasingly advanced intermediate level sentences and situations. They identify and produce accurate compound and complex sentences using passive, pronouns, and modals. Students apply the process of writing to paragraphs, mastering narrative, descriptive and expository modes. Greater accuracy of syntax and grammar are expected. Course is linked with ELIUP 052. Prerequisite: Acceptance to the ELI program.

ELIUP 052 Grammar Level III • 4.5 Cr.

Students master control of basic verb tenses in increasingly advanced intermediate level sentences and situations. They identify and produce accurate compound and complex sentences using passive, pronouns, and modals. Course is linked with ELIUP 051. Prerequisite: Acceptance to the ELI program.

ELIUP 053 Reading III • 4.5 Cr.

Students develop and practice comprehensive and critical reading skills including skimming, scanning, vocabulary development, etc. Identifying the author's main point of view and expressing an opinion about the passage are also emphasized. Study skills include finding materials in the library and interpreting graphs and tables. Prerequisite: Acceptance to the ELI program.

ELIUP 054 Speaking & Listening III • 4.5 Cr.

Students are introduced to oral presentation and begin acquiring and using analysis, organizational, and synthesis skills. Increasingly difficult oral proficiency skills are taught and practiced, including pronunciation. Students take notes, demonstrate eye contact and summarize orally. Prerequisite: Acceptance to the ELI program.

ELIUP 061 Integrated Skills IV • 4.5 Cr.

Course emphasizes academic writing skills, including formal instruction in sentence level expression (grammar). Assigned writing tasks are varied with an emphasis on timed writing and revision. Course is linked with ELIUP 062. Prerequisite: Acceptance to the ELI program.

ELIUP 062 Reading IV • 4.5 Cr.

Course emphasizes academic reading skills. Assigned reading includes a variety of lengths, styles, and levels of difficulty. Course is linked with ELIUP 061. Prerequisite: Acceptance to the ELI program.

ELIUP 063 Read and React IV • 4.5 Cr.

Emphasizes reading, related discussion, and critical thinking. Lengthy pieces of fiction and non-fiction are read, interpreted, evaluated and discussed. Prerequisite: Acceptance to the ELI program.

ELIUP 064 Speaking & Listening IV • 4.5 Cr.

Students develop their skills using lectures, presentations, and assigned readings. Oral presentation practice and development are featured. Listening skills include identifying mood and tone, anticipation of topics etc. Prerequisite: Acceptance to the ELI program.

ELIUP 065 Advanced Grammar • 4.5 Cr.

Students learn and practice advanced grammar constructions in both oral and written communication. Emphasis is on self-correction and practice with authentic language. Prerequisite: Acceptance to the ELI program.

ELIUP 066 American Culture • 4.5 Cr.

Students learn about and discuss values, assumptions, communication styles, behavior, and other aspects of cultural and ethnic diversity, concentrating specifically on American culture. Prerequisite: Acceptance to the ELI program.

ELIUP 067 English Through Film • 4.5 Cr.

Students increase their communication skills by viewing, discussing and thinking critically about films. Prerequisite: Acceptance to the ELI program.

ELIUP 068 Pronunciation & Accent Reduction • 4.5 Cr.

Students learn and practice specific difficult sounds, proper mouth position, stress, intonation, and rhythm, and how to assess and improve their own pronunciation. Prerequisite: Acceptance to the ELI program.

ELIUP 069 TOEFL Preparation • 4.5 Cr.

Students improve their test-taking skills, practice taking the TOEFL, and improve their listening comprehension, structure, and reading skills by focusing on specific TOEFL-type exercises. Prerequisite: Acceptance to the ELI program.

ELIUP 071 Integrated Skills V • 4.5 Cr.

Course emphasizes academic writing skills, including formal instruction in sentence level expression (grammar). Assigned writing tasks are varied with an emphasis on timed writing and revision. Course is linked with ELIUP 072. Prerequisite: Acceptance to the ELI program.

ELIUP 072 Reading V • 4.5 Cr.

Course emphasizes academic reading skills. Assigned reading includes a variety of lengths, styles, and levels of difficulty. Course is linked with ELIUP 071. Prerequisite: Acceptance to the ELI program.

ELIUP 073 Read & React V • 4.5 Cr.

Emphasis is on authentic material at a high level. Students read, interpret, evaluate, and discuss adult/college level fiction or non-fiction. Prerequisite: Acceptance to the ELI program.

ELIUP 074 Exploring Contemporary Issues • 4.5 Cr.

Course integrates instruction in speaking and listening skills through the exploration of contemporary topics. High interest topics are selected and current articles, videos and/or guest speakers are used to introduce new language and improve students' skills. Students work in teams to "present" their topics in class. Prerequisite: Acceptance to the ELI program.

ELIUP 080 Academic Preparation • 9 Cr.

Students learn and practice critical thinking, study skills, research techniques, and listening, speaking, reading, and writing in the content areas. Prerequisite: Acceptance to the ELI program.

ELIUP 084 English Through Music • 4.5 Cr.

Presents English grammar and vocabulary through songs in English. Students listen to different types of music (in English) to recognize and respect different perspectives of music. Students survey others about music and present their favorite songs in English to the class. Prerequisite: Acceptance to the ELI program.

ELIUP 087 English Through Technology • 4.5 Cr.

Designed to improve ESL students' English speaking, listening, reading, and writing skills with the aid of technology, multimedia tools, and discussions related to technology. Includes activities using the internet, social media, blogs, digital photography, digital voice recording, podcasting, digital storytelling, digital video production, discussions and readings on current technology trends. Prerequisite: Acceptance to the ELI program.

ELIUP 094 Special Topics in Intensive ESL • V1-10 Cr.

Covers additional topics in combination with English as a Second Language classes to help students achieve goals related to specific academic or vocational interests. Prerequisite: Permission of program chair.

ELIUP 095 Special Topics in Intensive ESL • V1-10 Cr.

Covers additional topics in combination with English as a Second Language classes to help students achieve goals related to specific academic or vocational interests. Prerequisite: Permission of program chair.

ELIUP 096 Special Topics in Intensive ESL • V1-10 Cr.

Covers additional topics in combination with English as a Second Language classes to help students achieve goals related to specific academic or vocational interests. Prerequisite: Permission of program chair.

ELIUP 097 Special Topics in Intensive ESL • V1-10 Cr.

Covers additional topics in combination with English as a Second Language classes to help students achieve goals related to specific academic or vocational interests. Prerequisite: Permission of program chair.

ENGL 072 Introductory College Reading and Writing I • 10 Cr.

Students learn reading and writing strategies to prepare them for success in higher level composition classes. Students are also enrolled automatically in ENGL 080, Reading Lab, to work more intensively on reading skills, which are a key to improving writing and editing skills. Course is graded credit/no credit; may be repeated for a maximum of 30 credits. Prerequisite: Placement by assessment.

ENGL 080 Improving Reading Skills Reading Lab • V1-2 Cr.

Open to all students, English 080 students work individually under the supervision of the Reading Lab Director. This course is a non-graded class and non-transferable credit. One credit represents 22 hours of lab work and the course may be taken for 1 or 2 credits. Students are automatically enrolled in English 080 if they are taking English 072 or English 089.

ENGL 089 Preparation for College Reading • 5 Cr.

Develops skills for students with reading assessment scores at grade levels of 11 to 12. Students develop strategies for effective reading and critical analysis of textbook readings with emphasis on discipline differences. Coordinated with parallel reading lab sections that emphasize acquisition of vocabulary and development of literal and inferential comprehension skills. Prerequisite: Placement by assessment.

ENGL 090 Strategies for Improving Writing Skills • V1-5 Cr.

Allows a student to work individually on an area of special need by arrangement with an instructor. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.

ENGL 091 Basic Grammar & Sentence Patterns • 5 Cr.

Reviews parts of speech, verb tenses, basic sentence patterns, and punctuation in the context of students' own writing. Students learn to combat writer's block, find and correct grammatical mistakes, and understand what teachers are telling them about their writing. Open to both native and non-native speakers. Course is graded credit/no credit. Prerequisite: Placement by assessment into ENGL 071 or higher.

ENGL 092 Introductory College Reading and Writing II • 5 Cr.

Students meet composition objectives by reading, writing, revising and editing essays and strengthening college study skills. Course work includes readings from a variety of sources and classroom instruction in sentence structure and variety. Prerequisite: Placement by assessment.

ENGL 093 ELL Introductory College Reading and Writing II • 5 Cr.

This course is tailored to the skills and needs of English language learners (ELL) who require more practice with essay reading, writing and editing before taking English 101. Students improve English skills through writing assignments based on college-level readings. Prerequisite: Placement by assessment.

ENGL& 101 English Composition I • 5 Cr.

Revised course description: Develops clear, effective writing skills and emphasizes writing as a process. Students practice writing in a variety of forms and modes. Prerequisite: Placement by assessment or ENGL 092 or 093 with a C- or better.

ENGL 105 Grammar & Communication • 5 Cr.

Provides an analytical overview of English grammar and sentence patterns, with emphasis on how language creates meaning. Students learn to clarify and control their own writing and understand various grammatical structures of English. Prerequisite: Placement by assessment; or ENGL 092 or 093 with a C- or better.

ENGL 106 Critical Reading in the Humanities • 5 Cr.

Course focuses on developing higher level cognitive skills: critical reading and questioning of a wide selection of materials-philosophy, education, religion, literature, culture-to examine ways of knowing and thinking, engaging in thoughtful dialogue with peers (via seminars or class/group discussions) on college level material, developing the art of asking insightful questions to generate and advance relevant discussion. Required parallel lab (ENGL 180, 1 or 2 credits) emphasizes vocabulary and comprehension skills. Prerequisite: Placement by assessment.

ENGL& 111 Introduction to Literature I • 5 Cr.

Surveys the major literary genres: poetry, drama, and fiction. Recommended: ENGL& 101 placement or higher.

ENGL& 112 Introduction to Fiction • 5 Cr.

Introduces fiction through short stories and one or more novels. Students learn close reading techniques and analyze the qualities of fictional literature. Recommended: ENGL& 101 placement or higher.

ENGL& 113 Introduction to Poetry • 5 Cr.

Introduces the style, structure, and techniques of poetry. Students read, analyze, and interpret works of major poets. Recommended: ENGL& 101 placement or higher.

ENGL& 114 Introduction to Drama • 5 Cr.

Introduces drama as literature, emphasizing conventions, styles, and techniques. Students read, analyze, and interpret works of traditional and modern playwrights. Recommended: ENGL& 101 placement or higher.

ENGL 115 The Film as Literature • 5 Cr.

Introduces the critical study of the motion picture as an expressive medium comparable to literary art. Students focus on cultural tradition and values. Recommended: ENGL& 101 placement or higher.

ENGL 131 Introduction to Literature II • 5 Cr.

Surveys the major literary genres: poetry, drama, and fiction. Recommended: ENGL& 101 placement or higher.

ENGL 180 Critical Reading in the Humanities Lab • V1-2 Cr.

Open to students who have placed at the English 101 level or above, English 180 students work individually under the supervision of the Reading Lab Director to strengthen skills that enhance the ability to read critically. This course is a graded class with transferable credits. One credit represents 22 hours of lab work and the course may be taken for 1 or 2 credits. Students are automatically enrolled in English 180 if they are taking English 106.

ENGL 190 Writing Lab Link for Discipline Courses • 1 Cr.

Provides additional instruction in support of discipline courses. Students work on term papers or other assignments with a writing instructor who guides them through the writing process, from research and note taking through drafting and editing. Students spend one hour a week in class and one hour a week in a tutoring session. Recommended ENGL& 101. Prerequisite: ENGL 092 or 093 with a C- or better.

ENGL 194 Special Studies in English • V1-5 Cr.

Allows specialized or in-depth study of a subject supplementing the English curriculum. Student interest and instructor expertise help determine the topic, to be announced in the class schedule.

ENGL 195 Special Studies in English • V1-5 Cr.

Allows specialized or in-depth study of a subject supplementing the English curriculum. Student interest and instructor expertise help determine the topic, to be announced in the class schedule.

ENGL 196 Special Studies in English • V1-5 Cr.

Allows specialized or in-depth study of a subject supplementing the English curriculum. Student interest and instructor expertise help determine the topic, to be announced in the class schedule.

ENGL 197 Special Studies in English • V1-5 Cr.

Allows specialized or in-depth study of a subject supplementing the English curriculum. Student interest and instructor expertise help determine the topic, to be announced in the class schedule.

ENGL 201 The Research Paper • 5 Cr.

Develops skills required for writing research papers. Students learn research techniques, source analysis, thesis development, argumentation styles, and summarizing. Fulfills a written communication course requirement at BC. Same as ENGL 102. Either ENGL 102 or ENGL 201 may be taken for credit, not both. Prerequisite: ENGL& 101 or equivalent course from another college with a C- or better.

ENGL 210 Introduction to European Literature • 5 Cr.

Examines selected fiction, drama, or poetry from European cultures. Content varies. Recommended: ENGL& 101 placement or higher.

ENGL 215 Myth Folktale & Legend • 5 Cr.

Examines traditional stories from different cultures. Students discuss common motifs and styles, relationships between cultural perspectives, and theories concerning origins and significance. Recommended: ENGL& 101 or ENGL 201, or a literature course in the 100 series.

ENGL 219 World Literature I • 5 Cr.

Course explores major themes and ideas found in the literature of a specific culture, region or ethnic group. Selected literature promotes historical, cultural and philosophical understanding of the material on its own terms and in relation to a larger body of literature. Prerequisite: ENGL& 101 and any 100 level literature course recommended.

ENGL 220 World Literature II • 5 Cr.

Explores additional major themes and ideas found in the literature of specific culture, region or ethnic group. Selected literature promotes historical, cultural and philosophical understanding of the material on its own terms and in relation to a larger body of literature. Prerequisite: ENGL 219. ENGL& 101 and any 100 level literature course recommended.

ENGL 221 Popular Literature • 5 Cr.

Investigates the themes, conventions, and cultural assumptions of genre-based popular literature. Specific topics vary and are announced in the class schedule. Recommended: ENGL& 101 or ENGL 201 or a literature course in the 100 series.

ENGL 223 Children's Literature • 5 Cr.

Examines literature written for children. Students discuss its moral, psychological, and political implications and its place in the larger literary heritage. Recommended: ENGL& 101 or ENGL 201 or a literature course in the 100 series.

ENGL& 224 Shakespeare I • 5 Cr.

Surveys the development of Shakespeare's dramatic and literary art. Students read and analyze representative comedies, tragedies, romances, and histories. Lecture/discussion format. Recommended: ENGL& 101 or ENGL 201 or a literature course in the 100 series.

ENGL& 225 Shakespeare II • 5 Cr.

Continues ENGL& 224 (prev ENGL 231) examining additional comedies, tragedies, and histories. Recommended: ENGL& 101 or ENGL 201 or a literature course in the 100 series.

ENGL 226 Literature & Current Issues I • 5 Cr.

Explores major themes and ideas found in literature framed by a chosen current social issue. Selected literature presents the issue from a variety of perspectives and promote a historical, cultural and philosophical understanding of the material on its own terms and in relation to a larger body of literature. Recommended: ENGL& 101 and any 100 level literature course.

ENGL 228 Historical Perspectives in Literature I • 5 Cr.

Explores major themes and ideas found in the literature of a specific historical period. Selected literature will promote historical, cultural and philosophical understanding of the material on its own terms and in relation to a larger body of literature. Prerequisite: ENGL& 101 and any 100 level literature course recommended.

ENGL 229 Historical Perspectives in Literature II • 5 Cr.

Explores additional themes and ideas found in the literature of a specific historical period. Selected literature will promote historical, cultural and philosophical understanding of the material on its own terms and in relation to a larger body of literature. Prerequisite: ENGL 228 or ENGL& 101 and any 100 level literature course recommended.

ENGL& 235 Technical Writing • 5 Cr.

Focuses on the development of professional skills in research, design, and communication of technical information. Emphasis on audience analysis, clear and effective writing style, and use of visual elements, by creating documents in a variety of professional report formats, such as memos, proposals, progress reports, completion reports, and instruction manuals. Computer use is required. Fulfills a written communication course requirement at BC. Prerequisite: ENGL& 101 or equivalent course from another college with a C- or better.

ENGL 237 Writing Fiction I • 5 Cr.

Focuses on the craft of the short story. Covers plot, scene, character, dialogue, voice and tone. Students write and critique short fiction and read the work of established short story writers. Suitable for beginning or advanced writers. Recommended: ENGL& 101 placement or higher.

ENGL 238 Writing Fiction II • 5 Cr.

Continuation of ENGL 237. Prerequisite: ENGL 237 with a C- or better or entry code.

ENGL 239 Writing Fiction III • 5 Cr.

Continuation of ENGL 238 (prev ENGL 234). Prerequisite: ENGL 238 (prev ENGL 234 with a C- or better or entry code.

ENGL 241 The Bible as Literature • 5 Cr.

Explores the oral and written literary traditions of the Old and New Testaments. Students focus on the cultural, historical, and literary aspects of scripture. Lecture/discussion format. Recommended: ENGL& 101 or ENGL 201 or a literature course in the 100 series.

ENGL& 244 American Literature I • 5 Cr.

Surveys the early American literary scene. Authors and works vary, but typically include Edwards, Franklin, Thoreau, Hawthorne, and Melville. Recommended: ENGL& 101 or ENGL 201 or a literature course in the 100 series.

ENGL& 245 American Literature II • 5 Cr.

Surveys American literature of the Realistic period. Authors and works vary, but typically include Dickinson, James, Adams, Howells, Crane, Dreiser, and Twain. Recommended: ENGL& 101 or ENGL 201 or a literature course in the 100 series.

ENGL& 246 American Literature III • 5 Cr.

Surveys 20th-century American literature, emphasizing the expatriates and the experimental. Authors and works vary, but typically include Fitzgerald, Hemingway, Steinbeck, Faulkner, O'Connor, Stevens, Eliot, Roethke, Lowell, Plath, Barth, and Pynchon. Recommended: ENGL& 101 or ENGL 201 or a literature course in the 100 series.

ENGL 247 Writing Poetry I • 5 Cr.

Focuses on the craft of poetry. Covers rhythm, image (simile, metaphor, symbol), voice, tone, and open and traditional forms. Students write and critique poetry and read the work of established poets. Suitable for beginning or experienced poets. Recommended: ENGL& 101 placement or higher.

ENGL 248 Writing Poetry II • 5 Cr.

Continuation of ENGL 247. Prerequisite: ENGL 247 with a C- or better or entry code.

ENGL 249 Writing Poetry III • 5 Cr.

Continuation of ENGL 248. Prerequisite: ENGL 248 with a C- or better or entry code.

ENGL 253 Writing Creative Non-fiction I • 5 Cr.

Focuses on the craft of short essay (memoir, travel essay, autobiography). Covers narration, characterization, dialogue, scene, voice and tone. Students write and critique short essays and read the work of established non-fiction writers. Suitable for beginning or experienced writers. Prerequisite: ENGL& 101 placement or higher.

ENGL 254 Writing Creative Non-fiction II • 5 Cr.

Continuation of ENGL 253. Prerequisite: ENGL 253 with a C- or better, or entry code.

ENGL 255 Writing Creative Non-fiction III • 5 Cr.

Continuation of ENGL 254. Prerequisite: ENGL 254 with a C- or better, or entry code.

ENGL 260 American Literature: Harlem Renaissance • 5 Cr.

Introduces students to the writers of the historic black culture movement known as the Harlem Renaissance. From W.E.B. DuBois and Langston Hughes to Zora Neale Hurston and Richard Wright, students explore the origins, themes, controversies and legacies of a literary and arts group known for its progressive thinking. Recommended: ENGL& 101 and ENGL 201.

ENGL 261 American Literature: Essential Black Voices • 5 Cr.

This course is an introduction to the central themes and aesthetics of the modern and contemporary periods in black American literature. Authors and works vary but would typically include Maya Angelou, Ralph Ellison, Gwendolyn Brooks, James Baldwin, Toni Morrison, Malcolm X, Charles Johnson, Octavia Butler and Nikki Giovanni. Recommended: Completion of ENGL& 101.

ENGL 263 British Literature: Middle Ages & Renaissance • 5 Cr.

Explores the relationships among language, literature, and cultural and intellectual context. Students examine representative works such as "Beowulf," Chaucer's "Canterbury Tales," and the poems and plays of Shakespeare. Recommended: ENGL& 101 or ENGL 201 or a literature course in the 100 series.

ENGL 264 The Age of Reason & Revolution • 5 Cr.

Surveys literary figures, styles, and themes of the 17th and 18th centuries. Authors and works vary, but typically include Donne, Milton, Pope, Goldsmith, Jonson, Swift, and Johnson. Students also discuss early periodicals and novels. Recommended: ENGL& 101 or ENGL 201 or a literature course in the 100 series.

ENGL 265 English Literature: Blake Through Hardy • 5 Cr.

Surveys the major Romantic and Victorian writers in their literary and cultural context. Authors and works vary, but typically include Blake, Wordsworth, Coleridge, Byron, The Shelleys, Keats, Tennyson, the Brownings, G. Eliot, Hardy, and Arnold. Recommended: ENGL& 101 or ENGL ENGL 201 or a literature course in the 100 series.

ENGL 266 English Literature: 20th-Century Writers • 5 Cr.

Surveys the major figures and movements of modern British literature. Authors and works vary, but typically include T.S. Eliot, Yeats, Conrad, Joyce, Lawrence, Auden, Thomas, Woolf, and Forster. Recommended: ENGL& 101 or ENGL 201 or a literature course in the 100 series.

ENGL 271 Expository Writing I • 5 Cr.

Builds on the writing skills learned in ENGL& 101 (prev ENGL 101) or ENGL 201. Students work on personal essays, information and opinion pa pers, reviews, profiles, articles based upon interviews, or other projects. Fulfills a written communication course requirement at BC. Prerequisite: ENGL& 101 or equivalent course from another college with a C- or better.

ENGL 272 Expository Writing II • 5 Cr.

Continues ENGL 271, developing more advanced writing skills. Fulfills a written communication course requirement at BC. Prerequisite: ENGL 271 with a C- or better.

ENGL 276 Women Writers • 5 Cr.

Explores the diverse styles, themes, and perspectives in women's writings from the 12th to the 20th centuries. Students discuss women's experiences and perspectives over time and within changing social contexts. Recommended: ENGL& 101 or ENGL 201 or a literature course in the 100 series.

ENGL 279 King Arthur the Round Table & the Grail • 5 Cr.

Explores the Celtic and medieval origins of the King Arthur legends in relation to modern retellings of the stories. Students discuss what the stories meant in their original contexts and what they mean to modern readers. Recommended: ENGL& 101 or ENGL 201 or a literature course in the 100 series.

ENGL 281 Creative Writing Conference • V1-5 Cr.

Allows a student to complete agreed-upon writing assignments under an instructor's direction. Open to students who have completed the creative writing series in either fiction or poetry with high achievement. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.

ENGL 294 Special Studies in Literature • 5 Cr.

Allows specialized or in-depth study of a subject supplementing the literature curriculum. Student interest and instructor expertise help determine the topic, to be announced in the class schedule. May be repeated for a maximum of 15 credits.

ENGL 295 Special Studies in Literature • 5 Cr.

Allows specialized or in-depth study of a subject supplementing the literature curriculum. Student interest and instructor expertise help determine the topic, to be announced in the class schedule. May be repeated for a maximum of 15 credits.

ENGL 296 Special Studies in Literature • 5 Cr.

Allows specialized or in-depth study of a subject supplementing the literature curriculum. Student interest and instructor expertise help determine the topic, to be announced in the class schedule. May be repeated for a maximum of 15 credits.

ENGL 297 Special Studies in Literature • 5 Cr.

Allows specialized or in-depth study of a subject supplementing the literature curriculum. Student interest and instructor expertise help determine the topic, to be announced in the class schedule. May be repeated for a maximum of 15 credits.

ENGL 299 Directed Reading & Research • V1-5 Cr.

Covers individual study of specific topics by arrangement with instructor. May be repeated for a maximum of 15 credits. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.

ENGR 111 Introduction to Engineering Analysis • 3 Cr.

Introduction to engineering analysis techniques, including: dimensional analysis, statistics and programming logic. Design process, group dynamics and communication skills also presented. Prerequisite: MATH& 142.

ENGR& 114 Engineering Graphics • 4 Cr.

Introduces methods of communicating technical information in engineering design and research. Topics include freehand sketching, lettering, scales, drawing layout, orthographic projection, pictorials, auxiliary views, section views, dimensioning, thread specifications, and tolerances. Includes Computer-Aided Design with parametric solid modeling, drawing production and assemblies. Prerequisite: MATH 098 or 099.

ENGR 199 Individual Studies in Engineering • V1-5 Cr.

Allows for special projects, student research and independent study in Engineering by an individual student. May be repeated for a maximum of 15 credits. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.

ENGR 200 Advanced Computer Aided Design • 3 Cr.

Includes Computer-Aided Design using multi body parts, sheet metal, surfacing and weldment models. Also covers engineering simulation analysis and an introduction to Computer Numerical Control. Prerequisite: ENGR& 114 or permission of instructor.

ENGR& 204 Electrical Circuits • 4 Cr.

Introduces fundamental concepts of electrical science. Topics include resistors, sources, capacitors, inductors, and operational amplifiers as individual components and as circuit systems. Also covers simultaneous algebraic equations and differential equations in solution methods. Prerequisite: MATH 238 and PHYS 122.

ENGR& 214 Statics • 4 Cr.

Explores principles of statics, vector algebra, force-couple relationships, equilibrium analysis, structures, area properties, beams, and friction. Prerequisite: PHYS 121 or MATH&254.

ENGR& 215 Dynamics • 4 Cr.

Surveys the dynamics of particles and rigid bodies using vector analysis. Specific topics include kinematics, kinetics, momentum, and energy principles for particles and rigid bodies, as well as Euler's Equations of Motion. Prerequisite: ENGR& 214.

ENGR& 224 Thermodynamics • 4 Cr.

Introduces basic principles of thermodynamics from a predominately macroscopic point of view. Topics include the basic laws of thermodynamics as relating to energy transformations and state changes in engineering problems. Recommended: CHEM& 162 and MATH& 152.

ENGR& 225 Mechanics of Materials • 4 Cr.

Introduces the concepts of stress, deformation, and strain in solid materials. Topics include basic relationships between loads on structural and machine elements such as rods, shafts, and beams, and the stresses, deflection and load-carrying capacity of these elements under tension, compression, torsion, bending, and shear forces. Prerequisite: ENGR& 214.

ENGR 299 Individual Studies in Engineering • V1-5 Cr.

Allows for advanced special projects, student research and independent study in Engineering by an individual student. May be repeated for a maximum of 15 credits. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.

ENVS& 100 Survey of Environmental Science • 5 Cr.

Surveys components of ecosystems, including energy flow and the structure and dynamics of populations and communities. Students review the processes that affect natural environments, examine the impact of human activities on ecosystems, and discuss current environmental issues.

ENVS 105 The Science of Sustainable Living • 5 Cr.

Introduces the science of sustainability as it relates to our everyday lives. Topics covered include sustainable practices pertaining to buildings, foods and agriculture, environmental health, carbon emissions, life-cycle analysis and waste, renewable energy, transportation, social justice, and personal economic choices. Students who take this course will learn how to make more sustainable choices in their day-to-day life.

ENVS 110 Environmental Oceanography • 5 Cr.

Provides an overview of ocean environmental issues, including the potential impacts of overfishing, undersea mining, habitat loss, pollution, costal development, and global climate change. Examined in the context of the innate relationship between humans and the sea. Same as OCEA 110. Either ENVS 110 or OCEA 110 may be taken for credit, not both.

ENVS 207 Field & Laboratory Environmental Science • 6 Cr.

Practices current scientific methods of investigation and analysis of a variety of environmental elements. Format includes approximately equal components of field experience and laboratory exercises. Fulfills laboratory science course requirement at BC.

ENVS 250 Puget Sound Ecology • 6 Cr.

Explores the geological formation, physical characteristics, major biological/ecological components, and significant environmental issues of the Puget Sound region. Format includes labs, guest speakers, and field trips. Fulfills laboratory science course requirement at BC.

ENVS 281 Current Issues in Environmental Science • V1-3 Cr.

Course allows students to explore, in detail, different areas of Environmental Science, discuss current issues, and helps prepare students for a career in Environmental Science. Recommended: ENVS& 100 or equivalent.

ENVS 282 Current Issues in Environmental Science • V1-3 Cr.

Course allows students to explore, in detail, different areas of Environmental Science, discuss current issues, and helps prepare students for a career in Environmental Science. Recommended: ENVS& 100 or equivalent.

ENVS 283 Current Issues in Environmental Science • V1-3 Cr.

Course allows students to explore, in detail, different areas of Environmental Science, discuss current issues, and helps prepare students for a career in Environmental Science. Recommended: ENVS& 100 or equivalent.

ENVS 294 Special Topics in Environmental Science • V1-10 Cr.

Covers advanced supplementary, contemporary, or focused topics related to Environmental Science. Topics are announced in the class schedule. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.

ENVS 295 Special Topics in Environmental Science • V1-10 Cr.

Covers advanced supplementary, contemporary, or focused topics related to Environmental Science. Topics are announced in the class schedule. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.

ENVS 296 Special Topics in Environmental Science • V1-10 Cr.

Covers advanced supplementary, contemporary, or focused topics related to Environmental Science. Topics are announced in the class schedule. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.

ENVS 297 Special Topics in Environmental Science • V1-10 Cr.

Covers advanced supplementary, contemporary, or focused topics related to Environmental Science. Topics are announced in the class schedule. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.

ENVS 299 Individual Studies in Environmental Science • V1-5 Cr.

Allows for advanced special projects, student research and independent study in Environmental Science by an individual student. May be repeated for a maximum of 15 credits. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.

ESL 010 ESL Orientation • V1-8 Cr.

No class description found.

ESL 031 Basic Skills Learning Lab - Level 1 • V1-5 Cr.

No class description found.

ESL 032 Basic Skills Learning Lab - Level 2 • V1-5 Cr.

No class description found.

ESL 033 Basic Skills Learning Lab - Level 3 • V1-5 Cr.

No class description found.

ESL 034 Basic Skills Learning Lab - Level 4 • V1-5 Cr.

No class description found.

ESL 035 Basic Skills Learning Lab - Level 5 • V1-5 Cr.

No class description found.

ESL 036 Basic Skills Learning Lab - Level 6 • V1-5 Cr.

No class description found.

ESL 051 English as a Second Language Level 1 • V1-10 Cr.

Prepares English-as-a-second language students to understand simple spoken phrases and respond to basic personal information questions. Students learn decoding skills and survival vocabulary to read and write personal statements. This is beginning literacy level ESL. Students must show progress in three quarters of instruction. Course is graded credit/no credit. Prerequisite: Placement by assessment.

ESL 052 English as a Second Language Level 2 • V1-10 Cr.

Prepares English-as-a-second language students to communicate using routine statements related to personal needs, desires, and feelings in familiar social contexts. Students learn to write basic messages, interpret maps, bills, and schedules, and follow written and oral instructions. This is beginning ESL. Students must show progress in three quarters of instruction. Course is graded credit/no credit. Prerequisite: Placement by assessment.

ESL 053 English as a Second Language Level 3 • V1-10 Cr.

Prepares English-as-a-second language students to communicate in familiar job, life-skill, or social situations. Students read short texts using simple context clues and decoding skills and write short paragraphs that are edited for basic grammar and spelling. This is intermediate ESL. Students must show progress in three quarters of instruction. Course is credit/no credit. Prerequisite: Placement by assessment.

ESL 054 English as a Second Language Level 4 • V1-10 Cr.

Prepares English-as-a-second language students to respond to multi-step directions and communicate using formal and informal language in various situations. Students follow written instruction, read narratives, interpret graphical material, and write and edit an organized paragraph. This is high intermediate ESL. Students must show progress in three quarters of instruction. Course is credit/no credit. Prerequisite: Placement by assessment.

ESL 055 English as a Second Language Level 5 • V1-10 Cr.

Prepares English-as-a-second language students to understand sustained conversation and instructions and to communicate independently in various situations. Students apply reading strategies and critical thinking skills when reading materials from authentic sources. Students write and edit organized paragraphs. This is low advanced ESL. Students must show progress in three quarters of instruction. Course is credit/no credit. Prerequisite: Placement by assessment.

ESL 056 English as a Second Language Level 6 • V1-10 Cr.

Prepares English-as-a-second language students to understand and communicate independently in selected authentic situations. Students apply reading strategies and critical thinking skills when reading materials from various sources. Students write and edit organized essays. This is high advanced ESL. Students must show progress in three quarters of instruction. Course is credit/no credit. Prerequisite: Placement by assessment.

ESL 061 English as a Second Language Level 1 • V1-10 Cr.

Prepares English-as-a-second language students to understand simple spoken phrases and respond to basic personal information questions. Students learn decoding skills and survival vocabulary to read and write personal statements. This is beginning literacy level ESL. Students must show progress in three quarters of instruction. Course is credit/no-credit. Prerequisite: Placement by assessment.

ESL 062 English as a Second Language Level 2 • V1-10 Cr.

Prepares English-as-a second language students to communicate using routine statements related to personal needs, desires, and feelings in familiar social contexts. Students learn to write basic messages, interpret maps, bills, and schedules, and follow written and oral instructions. This is beginning ESL. Students must show progress in three quarters of instruction. Course is credit/no-credit. Prerequisite: Placement by assessment.

ESL 063 English as a Second Language Level 3 • V1-10 Cr.

Prepares English-as-a second language students to communicate in familiar job, life-skill, or social situations. Students read short texts using simple context clues and decoding skills and write short paragraphs that are edited for basic grammar and spelling. This is intermediate ESL. Students must show progress in three quarters of instruction. Course is credit/no-credit. Prerequisite: Placement by assessment.

ESL 064 English as a Second Language Level 4 • V1-10 Cr.

Prepares English-as-a-second language students to respond to multi-step directions and communicate using formal and informal language in various situations. Students follow written instruction, read narratives, interpret graphical material, and write and edit an organized paragraph. This is high intermediate ESL. Students must show progress in three quarters of instruction. Course is credit/no-credit. Prerequisite: Placement by assessment.

ESL 065 English as a Second Language Level 5 • V1-10 Cr.

Prepares English-as-a-second language students to understand sustained conversation and instructions and to communicate independently in various situations. Students apply reading strategies and critical thinking skills when reading materials from authentic sources. Students write and edit organized paragraphs. This is low advanced ESL. Students must show progress in three quarters of instruction. Course is credit/no-credit. Prerequisite: Placement by assessment.

ESL 066 English as a Second Language Level 6 • V1-10 Cr.

Prepares English-as-a-second language students to understand and communicate independently in selected authentic situations. Students apply reading strategies and critical thinking skills when reading materials from various sources. Students write and edit organized essays. This is high advanced ESL. Students must show progress in three quarters of instruction. Course is credit/no-credit. Prerequisite: Placement by assessment.

ESL 071 English as a Second Language Level 1 • V1-10 Cr.

Prepares English-as-a-second language students to understand simple spoken phrases and respond to basic personal information questions. Students learn decoding skills and survival vocabulary to read and write personal statements. This is beginning literacy level ESL. Students must show progress in three quarters of instruction. Course is credit/no-credit. Prerequisite: Placement by assessment.

ESL 072 English as a Second Language Level 2 • V1-10 Cr.

Prepares English-as-a second language students to communicate using routine statements related to personal needs, desires, and feelings in familiar social contexts. Students learn to write basic messages, interpret maps, bills, and schedules, and follow written and oral instructions. This is beginning ESL. Students must show progress in three quarters of instruction. Course is credit/no-credit. Prerequisite: Placement by assessment.

ESL 073 English as a Second Language Level 3 • V1-10 Cr.

Prepares English-as-a second language students to communicate in familiar job, life-skill, or social situations. Students read short texts using simple context clues and decoding skills and write short paragraphs that are edited for basic grammar and spelling. This is intermediate ESL. Students must show progress in three quarters of instruction. Course is credit/no-credit. Prerequisite: Placement by assessment

ESL 074 English as a Second Language Level 4 • V1-10 Cr.

Prepares English-as-a-second language students to respond to multi-step directions and communicate using formal and informal language in various situations. Students follow written instruction, read narratives, interpret graphical material, and write and edit an organized paragraph. This is high intermediate ESL. Students must show progress in three quarters of instruction. Course is credit/no-credit. Prerequisite: Placement by assessment.

ESL 075 English as a Second Language Level 5 • V1-10 Cr.

Prepares English-as-a-second language students to understand sustained conversation and instructions and to communicate independently in various situations. Students apply reading strategies and critical thinking skills when reading materials from authentic sources. Students write and edit organized paragraphs. This is low advanced ESL. Students must show progress in three quarters of instruction. Course is credit/no-credit. Prerequisite: Placement by assessment.

ESL 076 English as a Second Language Level 6 • V1-10 Cr.

Prepares English-as-a-second language students to understand and communicate independently in selected authentic situations. Students apply reading strategies and critical thinking skills when reading materials from various sources. Students write and edit organized essays. This is high advanced ESL. Students must show progress in three quarters of instruction. Course is credit/no-credit. Prerequisite: Placement by assessment.

ESL 081 English as a Second Language Level 1 • V1-10 Cr.

Prepares English-as-a-second language students to understand simple spoken phrases and respond to basic personal information questions. Students learn decoding skills and survival vocabulary to read and write personal statements. This is beginning literacy level ESL. Students must show progress in three quarters of instruction. Course is credit/no-credit. Prerequisite: Placement by assessment.

ESL 082 English as a Second Language Level 2 • V1-10 Cr.

Prepares English-as-a second language students to communicate using routine statements related to personal needs, desires, and feelings in familiar social contexts. Students learn to write basic messages, interpret maps, bills, and schedules, and follow written and oral instructions. This is beginning ESL. Students must show progress in three quarters of instruction. Course is credit/no-credit. Prerequisite: Placement by assessment.

ESL 083 English as a Second Language Level 3 • V1-10 Cr.

Prepares English-as-a second language students to communicate in familiar job, life-skill, or social situations. Students read short texts using simple context clues and decoding skills and write short paragraphs that are edited for basic grammar and spelling. This is intermediate ESL. Students must show progress in three quarters of instruction. Course is credit/no-credit. Prerequisite: Placement by assessment.

ESL 084 English as a Second Language Level 4 • V1-10 Cr.

Prepares English-as-a-second language students to respond to multi-step directions and communicate using formal and informal language in various situations. Students follow written instruction, read narratives, interpret graphical material, and write and edit an organized paragraph. This is high intermediate ESL. Students must show progress in three quarters of instruction. Course is credit/no-credit. Prerequisite: Placement by assessment.

ESL 085 English as a Second Language Level 5 • V1-10 Cr.

Prepares English-as-a-second language students to understand sustained conversation and instructions and to communicate independently in various situations. Students apply reading strategies and critical thinking skills when reading materials from authentic sources. Students write and edit organized paragraphs. This is low advanced ESL. Students must show progress in three quarters of instruction. Course is credit/no-credit. Prerequisite: Placement by assessment.

ESL 086 English as a Second Language Level 6 • V1-10 Cr.

Prepares English-as-a-second language students to understand and communicate independently in selected authentic situations. Students apply reading strategies and critical thinking skills when reading materials from various sources. Students write and edit organized essays. This is high advanced ESL. Students must show progress in three quarters of instruction. Course is credit/no-credit. Prerequisite: Placement by assessment.

ESLCO 0070 WEB PAGE DESIGN I • 0 Cr.

No class description found.

EWU 000 STUDENT FEES • 0 Cr.

No class description found.

EXPRL 187 Prior Learning Portfolio Development • 2 Cr.

Students document college-level learning derived from non-college experience. Documentation is presented for evaluation of college-level learning and subsequent awarding of college credit. Course is graded as Credit/non-credit. Prerequisite: Permission of program chair or instructor.

EXPRL 190 Learning Portfolio Fundamentals • 2 Cr.

Introduces students to the basic steps needed to build a learning portfolio. Students learn to select and develop evidence, reflect on significant learning, and connect evidence and reflections in an organized portfolio.

EXPRL 191 Academic Internship Experience • V1-5 Cr.

Provides a framework to integrate practical work experience with academic goals. Participants develop solid learning objectives to guide their experience, document the experience for later use, and reflect upon what they have learned in order to connect their practical and academic work. Students must have an approved internship before registering. Course is graded pass/fail. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.

EXPRL 192 Academic Internship Experience • V1-5 Cr.

Provides a framework to integrate practical work experience with academic goals. Participants develop solid learning objectives to guide their experience, document the experience for later use, and reflect upon what they have learned in order to connect their practical and academic work. Students must have an approved internship before registering. Course is graded pass/fail. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.

EXPRL 193 Academic Internship Experience • V1-5 Cr.

Provides a framework to integrate practical work experience with academic goals. Participants develop solid learning objectives to guide their experience, document the experience for later use, and reflect upon what they have learned in order to connect their practical and academic work. Students must have an approved internship before registering. Course is graded pass/fail. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.

EXPRL 194 Special Topics in Experiential Learning • V1-5 Cr.

No class description found.

EXPRL 195 Special Topics in Experiential Learning • V1-5 Cr.

No class description found.

EXPRL 196 Special Topics in Experiential Learning • V1-5 Cr.

No class description found.

EXPRL 197 Special Topics in Experiential Learning • V1-5 Cr.

No class description found.

EXPRL 220 Resume & Interviewing Strategies • 2 Cr.

Introduction to the basic steps of writing a targeted resume and formulating answers to typical interview questions. Includes presentation of accomplishments, both written and verbal, in the process of seeking employment.

EXPRL 230 Job Shadowing & Professional Networking • 2 Cr.

Career Center connects students with local employers in their field of interest. Students research jobs, interview and network with professionals, develop communication skills, and identify attributes with a focus on future employment. Recommended: 15 college level credits.

EXPRL 294 Special Topics in Experiential Learning • V1-5 Cr.

No class description found.

EXPRL 295 Special Topics in Experiential Learning • V1-5 Cr.

No class description found.

EXPRL 296 Special Topics in Experiential Learning • V1-5 Cr.

No class description found.

EXPRL 297 Special Topics in Experiential Learning • V1-5 Cr.

No class description found.

FEE 015 TECHNOLOGY FEE - $15.00 • 0 Cr.

No class description found.

FRCH& 121 French I • 5 Cr.

Introduces basic speaking, reading, and writing skills. Students learn by listening and speaking as well as reading and writing with the help of a variety of web based materials.

FRCH& 122 French II • 5 Cr.

Continues FRCH& 121. Recommended: FRCH& 121, one year of High School or permission of instructor.

FRCH& 123 French III • 5 Cr.

Continues FRCH& 121. Recommended: FRCH& 122, two years of High School or permission of instructor.

FRCH 131 Language & Culture Immersion-Beg 1st Year French • 5 Cr.

Introduces basic speaking, reading and writing skills to the complete beginner (debutant) who has little or no previous exposure to elementary French. Placement is determined by approved host institution. Students experience complete immersion into a 100% French-speaking on-site environment. Portfolio evaluation required to receive credit. Prerequisite: Placement determined by assessment at host institution.

FRCH 132 Language & Culture Immersion-Int 1st Year French • 5 Cr.

Gives beginner with some previous knowledge of elementary French (faux debutant) an opportunity to improve use of basic oral and written skills in a variety of everyday situations using readily understandable language. Students experience complete immersion into a 100% French-speaking on-site environment. Portfolio evaluation required to receive credit. Prerequisite: Placement determined by approved host institution and permission of instructor.

FRCH 133 Language & Culture Immersion-Adv 1st Year French • 5 Cr.

Allows student with working knowledge of elementary French using past, present & future tenses in basic social situations (pre-intermediarie) the opportunity to expand and improve spoken and written skills. Continues FRNCH 122. Students experience complete immersion into a 100% French-speaking on-site environment. Portfolio evaluation required to receive credit. Prerequisite: Placement by approved host institution and permission of instructor.

FRCH 194 Special Topics in French • V1-5 Cr.

Allows specialized or in-depth study of subjects related to French language and culture. Prerequisite: Current French students.

FRCH 195 Special Topics in French • V1-5 Cr.

Allows specialized or in-depth study of subjects related to French language and culture. Prerequisite: Current French students.

FRCH 196 Special Topics in French • V1-5 Cr.

Allows specialized or in-depth study of subjects related to French language and culture. Prerequisite: Current French students.

FRCH 197 Special Topics in French • V1-5 Cr.

Allows specialized or in-depth study of subjects related to French language and culture. Prerequisite: Current French students.

FRCH& 221 French IV • 5 Cr.

Reviews and expands on first-year French grammar. Students increase their oral and written competencies, working in an authentic literary and cultural context. Recommended: FRCH& 123 or permission of instructor.

FRCH& 222 French V • 5 Cr.

Continues FRCH& 221.Recommended: FRCH& 221 or permission of instructor.

FRCH& 223 French VI • 5 Cr.

Continues FRCH& 222. Recommended: FRCH& 222 or permission of instructor.

FRCH 231 Language & Culture Immersion-Basic 2nd Yr French • 5 Cr.

Gives a student with a general understanding of spoken and written functional language (intermediaire) the opportunity to expand and perfect their oral and written command of intermediate French in daily situations.

FRCH 232 Language & Culture Immersion-Basic 2nd Yr French • 5 Cr.

Allows students to use spoken and written French with relative ease (intermediaire avance) to expand their ability to explain a variety of general and specific information using advanced intermediate functional language. Continues FRNCH 221. Students experience complete immersion into 100% French-speaking on-site environment. Portfolio evaluation required to receive credit. Prerequisite: Placement by approved host institution and permission of instructor.

FRCH 233 Language & Culture Immersion-Basic 2nd Yr French • 5 Cr.

Gives a student the ability to use appropriate vocabulary and grammar at a normal rate of speech with excellent pronunciation (avance) the opportunity to enhance their use of advanced oral and written French. Continues FRNCH 222. Students experience complete immersion into 100% French-speaking on-site environment. Portfolio evaluation required to receive credit. Prerequisite: Placement by approved host institution and permission of instructor.

FRCH 294 Special Topics in French • V1-5 Cr.

Allows specialized or in-depth study of subjects related to French language and culture. Prerequisite: Current French students or permission of instructor.

FRCH 295 Special Topics in French • V1-5 Cr.

Allows specialized or in-depth study of subjects related to French language and culture. Prerequisite: Current French students or permission of instructor.

FRCH 296 Special Topics in French • V1-5 Cr.

Allows specialized or in-depth study of subjects related to French language and culture. Prerequisite: Current French students or permission of instructor.

FRCH 297 Special Topics in French • V1-5 Cr.

Allows specialized or in-depth study of subjects related to French language and culture. Prerequisite: Current French students or permission of instructor.

FT 075 WEB PRODUCTION ASSOCIATE • 0 Cr.

No class description found.

FYI 090 FIRST YEAR INTRODUCTION • 0 Cr.

No class description found.

GEOG& 100 Introduction to Geography • 5 Cr.

Surveys the concepts and methods of geography by examining humankind's influence on the environment and the environment's impact on humankind. Topics include patterns and processes of world climates, culture, population, urbanization, economic activities, and resources.

GEOG 102 World Regional Geography • 5 Cr.

Studies world geographical relationships. Students analyze and interpret demographic, economic, political, social, and resource distribution patterns in the contemporary world, as well as the factors leading to these regional distributions and the interrelationships among them. Please see quarterly schedule for region of study.

GEOG 105 Geography of World Affairs • 5 Cr.

Offers a geographical perspective on contemporary world problems. Students investigate economic, demographic, social, political, cultural, and environmental issues, with emphasis on interrelationships, patterns, processes, and potential solutions. Same as INTST 105. Either GEOG 105 or INTST 105 can be taken for credit but not both.

GEOG 108 Violent Face of Nature • 5 Cr.

Provides the background needed to be knowledgeable about the inherent dangers in living with nature as evidenced by actual catastrophes or disasters. Primary focus is on physical processes such as earthquakes; severe storms; and flash flooding that often occur without much warning and longer-term potential hazards such as global warming that may have even greater consequences. Also, current advances in hazards research and applied mitigation techniques will be addressed. This course fulfills a natural science course requirement at BC.

GEOG 123 Introduction to Globalization • 5 Cr.

Globalization considers the dynamic processes and consequences of human contact over time that cross traditional economic, cultural and geographic boundaries. The course examines the ever increasing flows of goods, people, ideas, capital and services and the subsequent challenges that have emerged for humankind. Same as INTST 123. Either GEOG 123 or INTST 123 may be taken for credit, but not both.

GEOG 194 Special Topics in Geography • V1-10 Cr.

Covers supplementary or unusual classes related to the field. Topics are announced in the class schedule. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.

GEOG 195 Special Topics in Geography • V1-10 Cr.

Covers supplementary or unusual classes related to the field. Topics are announced in the class schedule. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.

GEOG 196 Special Topics in Geography • V1-10 Cr.

Covers supplementary or unusual classes related to the field. Topics are announced in the class schedule. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.

GEOG 197 Special Topics in Geography • V1-10 Cr.

Covers supplementary or unusual classes related to the field. Topics are announced in the class schedule. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.

GEOG 198 Seminar in Geography • V1-10 Cr.

Includes seminars, workshops, etc., for which college credit is offered.

GEOG 199 Individual Studies in Geography • V1-10 Cr.

overs directed readings, special projects, and independent study by an individual student. May be repeated for a maximum of 15 credits. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.

GEOG& 200 Human Geography • 5 Cr.

Explores the relationship between humankind and the physical environment. Based on a series of case studies ranging from the streets of Havana to the soccer stadiums of Europe and the cultural adaptations of the Inuit as they adjust to the physical challenges of their homeland.

GEOG 205 Geography of Weather and Climate Change • 5 Cr.

Investigates the dynamic patterns and processes of weather, climates, vegetation, and soils. Attention is given to the human significance of different natural, as well as human-altered environments. Fulfills natural science course requirement at BC.

GEOG 206 Landforms & Landform Processes • 6 Cr.

Surveys the origin and evolution of Landforms by investigating the physical and chemical processes responsible for their development. Landforms such as: volcanic cones, fault structures, and glacial features, are identified by analyzing and interpreting data, graphs, and maps and by using visual aids including slides, videos, and CDs. Fulfills laboratory science credit at BC.

GEOG 250 Geography of the Pacific Northwest • 5 Cr.

Presents elementary geographical concepts as they apply to the Pacific Northwest region. Students become familiar with geomorphological and climatological processes and their relationship to settlement, population, and economic patterns.

GEOG 258 Intro to Mapping & Geographic Information System • 5 Cr.

The maps we use shape the way we think about the world. Course explores the history and influence of maps and mapmakers, from the ancient world to the high-tech images of today. Basic computer literacy recommended.

GEOG 277 Geography of Cities • 5 Cr.

A study of the location and function of cities as well as their internal layout and the cultural and economic components of these urban areas. Case studies cover all regions of the world from North America to Europe, Latin America, Africa and Asia.

GEOG 294 Special Topics in Geography • V1-10 Cr.

Covers supplementary or unusual topics related to the field. Topics are announced in the class schedule.

GEOG 295 Special Topics in Geography • V1-10 Cr.

Covers supplementary or unusual topics related to the field. Topics are announced in the class schedule.

GEOG 296 Special Topics in Geography • V1-10 Cr.

Covers supplementary or unusual topics related to the field. Topics are announced in the class schedule.

GEOG 297 Special Topics in Geography • V1-10 Cr.

Covers supplementary or unusual topics related to the field. Topics are announced in the class schedule.

GEOG 298 Seminar in Geography • V1-10 Cr.

Includes seminars, workshops, etc., for which college credit is offered.

GEOG 299 Individual Studies in Geography • V1-10 Cr.

Covers directed readings, special projects, and independent study by an individual student. Maybe repeated for a maximum of 15 credits. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.

GEOL& 101 Introduction to Physical Geology • 6 Cr.

Studies the physical processes, both on and beneath the surface, that have over time given the earth its present form. Course format includes field and laboratory study of minerals, rocks, and maps. Fulfills laboratory science course requirement at BC.

GEOL 103 Evolution of the Earth • 6 Cr.

Surveys the geologic history of the earth, including the history of life on earth. Students learn to interpret rock and fossil evidence. The course is designed for non-majors includes laboratory work. Fulfills laboratory science course requirement at BC.

GEOL 107 Geologic Catastrophes • 5 Cr.

Explore the science behind our restless earth. This class examines the geologic disasters that face human society, including volcanic eruptions, earthquakes, tsunami, landslides, floods, meteorite impacts and global climate change. In addition, we will examine ways that we can better prepare our society and ourselves for when disaster strikes.

GEOL 194 Special Topics in Geology • V1-5 Cr.

Covers supplementary, contemporary, or focused topics related to Geology. Topics are announced in the class schedule. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.

GEOL 195 Special Topics in Geology • V1-5 Cr.

Covers supplementary, contemporary, or focused topics related to Geology. Topics are announced in the class schedule. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.

GEOL 196 Special Topics in Geology • V1-5 Cr.

Covers supplementary, contemporary, or focused topics related to Geology. Topics are announced in the class schedule. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.

GEOL 197 Special Topics in Geology • V1-5 Cr.

Covers supplementary, contemporary, or focused topics related to Geology. Topics are announced in the class schedule. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.

GEOL 199 Individual Studies in Geology • V1-5 Cr.

Allows for special projects, student research and independent study in Geology by an individual student. May be repeated for a maximum of 15 credits. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.

GEOL& 208 Geology of the Pacific NW • 6 Cr.

Examines the geologic history of the Pacific Northwest, focusing on geologic processes important to its evolution. Students use evidence from rocks, landforms, and maps to reconstruct the geological story of the region. Fulfills laboratory science course requirement at BC.

GEOL 299 Individual Studies in Geology • V1-5 Cr.

Allows for advanced special projects, student research and independent study in Geology by an individual student. May be repeated for a maximum of 15 credits. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.

GERM& 121 German I • 5 Cr.

Introduces the fundamentals of the German language. Students develop basic listening, reading, speaking, and writing skills through activities and exercises that include cultural aspects of the German language.

GERM& 122 German II • 5 Cr.

Continues GERM& 121. Recommended: GERM& 121, one year of High School or permission of instructor.

GERM& 123 German III • 5 Cr.

Continues GERM& 122. Recommended: GERM& 122, two years of High School or permission of instructor.

GERM 194 Special Topics in German • V1-5 Cr.

Allows specialized or in-depth study of subjects related to German language and culture. Prerequisite: Current German students.

GERM 195 Special Topics in German • V1-5 Cr.

Allows specialized or in-depth study of subjects related to German language and culture. Prerequisite: Current German students.

GERM 196 Special Topics in German • V1-5 Cr.

Allows specialized or in-depth study of subjects related to German language and culture. Prerequisite: Current German students.

GERM 197 Special Topics in German • V1-5 Cr.

Allows specialized or in-depth study of subjects related to German language and culture. Prerequisite: Current German students.

GERM& 221 German IV • 5 Cr.

Reviews and expands on first-year German grammar. Students increase their oral and written competencies, working in an authentic literary and cultural context. Recommended: GERM& 123 or permission of instructor.

GERM& 222 German V • 5 Cr.

Continues GERM& 221. Recommended: GERM& 221 or permission of instructor.

GERM& 223 German VI • 5 Cr.

Continues GERM& 222. Recommended: GERM& 222 or permission of instructor.

GERM 294 Special Topics in German • V1-5 Cr.

Allows specialized or in-depth study of subjects related to German language and culture. Prerequisite: Current German students.

GERM 295 Special Topics in German • V1-5 Cr.

Allows specialized or in-depth study of subjects related to German language and culture. Prerequisite: Current German students.

GERM 296 Special Topics in German • V1-5 Cr.

Allows specialized or in-depth study of subjects related to German language and culture. Prerequisite: Current German students.

GERM 297 Special Topics in German • V1-5 Cr.

Allows specialized or in-depth study of subjects related to German language and culture. Prerequisite: Current German students.

HCI 293 HCI - New Student Orientation • 4 Cr.

This course prepares students in the Healthcare Informatics program for transition into baccalaureate-level study. Students gain an understanding of program expectations, campus resources, and strategies for success in an online learning environment. Critical reading, research, and writing skills are included. Additionally, students make connections with HCI faculty, staff and peers, develop learning management system user skills and establish a learning portfolio. Prerequisite: Acceptance into the program, or permission of instructor. Previously HCTM 293.

HCI 301 US Healthcare Policies and Delivery Systems • 5 Cr.

Introduction to healthcare systems in the United States. Students will identify laws, regulations, standards, initiatives, and payment systems; learn the impact of policies and procedures applicable to the various healthcare organizations; and gain an appreciation of the roles and disciplines of providers throughout the US healthcare system. Includes comparison of the national and international healthcare systems. Prerequisite: Acceptance into the program, or permission of instructor. Previously HCTM 301.

HCI 302 Healthcare Safety & Quality Management • 5 Cr.

Covers general safety and quality processes in the US healthcare system, including care processes, legislative, regulatory, and accreditation processes. Includes policies and procedures pertaining to patient safety, healthcare quality, data confidentiality, privacy, release of information, and professional and practice-related ethical issues. Introduces basic statistical methods used to analyze healthcare data. Prerequisite: MATH 130 and acceptance into the program, or permission of instructor. Previously HCTM 302.

HCI 310 Essentials of Healthcare Informatics • 5 Cr.

Examines the role of healthcare informatics in improving healthcare quality and safety. Covers electronic health records, health information exchange, consumer information needs, global health, public health informatics, and clinical information systems. Also looks at trends in health information technologies at the organizational and patient level. Prerequisite: Acceptance into the program, or permission of instructor. Previously HCTM 310.

HCI 315 Electronic Health Records • 5 Cr.

Provides students with a broad overview of electronic health record (EHR) design, implementation, and use of EHRs. Includes promises and pitfalls of EHRs, role of EHR in improving care quality and safety, and pros and cons of different EHR design. Government and regulatory agency requirements for EHR implementation and use will be covered along with the role of EHR users in design and implementation. Prerequisite: HCI 310 and acceptance into the program, or permission of instructor. Previously HCTM 315.

HCI 320 HCI Data Standards & Interoperability • 5 Cr.

Covers standards designed to enable interoperability of healthcare information systems. Includes benefits and challenges of healthcare systems interoperability along with data standards (HL7 v2, HL7 v3 RIM, CDA, SNOMED) that support interoperability. Students will learn how data standards are incorporated into national regulations and health information exchange. Prerequisites: HCI 310 and acceptance into the program, or permission of the instructor. Previously HCTM 320.

HCI 330 Teaching and Training in Healthcare Informatics • 5 Cr.

Successful implementation of HIT requires extensive training. This course addresses general and special issues associated with adult learning in healthcare information technology. Covers training methods used for diverse, interdisciplinary audiences. Prerequisites: HCI 310 and acceptance into the program, or permission of the instructor. Previously HCTM 330.

HCI 350 Usability and User Centered Design • 5 Cr.

This course covers the role of human factors, usability, and user centered design in healthcare. Presents the impact of clinical information system design and usability on risk for medical errors. Students will evaluate usability testing methods appropriate for the type of healthcare setting and user characteristics along with system redesign to improve usability. Prerequisites: HCI 310 and HCI 315, or permission of the instructor. Previously HCTM 350.

HCI 360 Healthcare Information Seeking and Evaluation • 3 Cr.

Covers theory and practices related to health information seeking and evaluation. Includes determination of information needs by healthcare professionals and consumers, conversion of a given information need into a searchable question, selection of appropriate search tools, conducting the information search, and evaluating search results. Prerequisites: HCI 310 with a grade of C or higher, or permission of the instructor. Previously HCTM 390.

HCI 375 Healthcare Informatics Project Management • 5 Cr.

Examines project management theory and practice with emphasis on project management in healthcare IT settings. Students will evaluate tools used to develop and manage healthcare IT projects and select appropriate tools for developing a project based on a case study. Prerequisites: HCI 310 and HCI 315 with a grade of C or higher, or permission of instructor. Previously HCTM 375.

HCI 380 Healthcare Code Sets & Clinical Terminologies • 5 Cr.

Covers structured terminology systems currently in use in healthcare settings, including medical, nursing, laboratory and other allied health terminologies. Includes historical development and use of terminologies, revision processes, use in electronic health records as well as requirements for statistical reporting. Prerequisites: HCI 310 and HCI 315 with the grades of C or higher, or permission of the instructor. Previously HCTM 380.

HCI 385 Consumer Health Informatics • 5 Cr.

This course focuses on consumer healthcare information needs, information seeking behaviors, and information sources. Topics include social networks, patient portals and information sources focused on health conditions. Additional focus will be given to development, use and regulation of personal health records as well as evaluation of health condition specific information available on the web. Prerequisite: HCI 310 with the grades of C or higher, or permission of the instructor. Previously HCTM 385.

HCI 398 Professional Portfolio • V1-5 Cr.

This course allows students to work directly with a faculty member to develop an E-portfolio that can be evaluated for award of non-traditional credit for prior experiential learning. Prerequisite: Admission into program or permission of instructor.

HCI 399 HCI Independent Study • V1-5 Cr.

Covers directed readings, special projects and independent study by an individual student. Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor.

HCI 405 Health and Information Literacy • 5 Cr.

Healthcare informatics professionals are at the forefront of current initiatives aimed at providing consumer-centric healthcare. Success of these initiatives depends on thorough understanding of concepts associated with health and information literacy. Students will develop skills needed to assess health and information literacy, locate, evaluate and effectively use information appropriate to meet consumer health information needs. Prerequisite: HCI 360 or permission of the instructor. Previously HCTM 405.

HCI 410 Healthcare Clinical Systems Analysis • 5 Cr.

Presents strategies and tools for systems analysis and the development of user and systems requirements. Emphasis is on capturing and evaluating the needs of various stakeholders including physicians, nurses, patients, and caregivers, as well as meeting health information technology general practices and regulations, and covers techniques to analyze and model healthcare processes. Prerequisite: HCI 310 and 315 with C or higher, or permission of instructor. Previously HCTM 410.

HCI 435 Healthcare Informatics Systems Operation • 5 Cr.

Covers all aspects of healthcare clinical information system implementation and administration. Includes vendor selection, implementation planning, system customization, configuration and testing, user training, key issues, best practices, and adherence to healthcare standards and regulations. Prerequisite: HCI 310 and 315, or permission of instructor. Previously HCTM 435.

HCI 450 Healthcare Analytics and Quality • 5 Cr.

Explores the scope and role of data and data analytics in healthcare. Covers data management concepts including data governance, validation, storage and retrieval. Covers healthcare database design and creation. Introduces basic analytic techniques used to generate findings for interpretation and techniques used to meet end user needs for visualizing and interpreting results. Prerequisites: HCI 302 and MATH 130 (or equivalent), or permission of instructor. Previously HCTM 450.

HCI 456 Healthcare Data Visualization • 5 Cr.

Presents students with best practices for healthcare data management with a focus on visualization of healthcare data analysis. Students will utilize best practices in data governance to ensure that data quality is maintained throughout the analytics process. Strategies for extracting data from disparate databases will be covered along with data transformation and loading into formats suitable for analysis. Prerequisites: HCI 302, HCI 450 and MATH 130 (or equivalent), or permission of instructor. Previously HCTM 456.

HCI 460 Leading Change in Healthcare Informatics • 5 Cr.

Prepares students for leadership roles in healthcare informatics. Covers leadership characteristics, roles and responsibilities in healthcare informatics. Topics include leadership theories, responsibilities, and skills. Addresses the unique role of leaders in managing transformational change in healthcare informatics. Students will assess their own leadership skills and develop plans for lifelong learning as leaders in healthcare informatics. Prerequisites: HCI 310 and acceptance into program, or permission of instructor. Previously HCTM 460.

HCI 465 HCI Field Studies/Capstone Orientation • 2 Cr.

This course prepares students for the HCI Capstone and Field Studies courses. Students will prepare professional goals, objectives as well as a personal mission statement, vision and career strategic plan. Students taking Field Studies (HCI 475) work with possible mentors to identify and secure a site for their Field Studies while students taking Capstone (HCI 485) identify their paper topic, evaluate writing skills, and begin the research process. Previously HCTM 465. Prerequisite: Acceptance into program or permission of instructor.

HCI 470 Healthcare Analytics Applications • 5 Cr.

Analyze strategies, benefits and limitations of data analytics in various healthcare environments. In the context of case studies, evaluate, select and apply analytics tools and methods to support key clinical, operational and financial decisions. Prerequisites: HCI 456, or permission of instructor. Previously HCTM 470.

HCI 475 Healthcare Informatics Field Studies • 4 Cr.

This course provides students with the opportunity to gain a deeper understanding of the healthcare environment through industry internship or practicum. Previously HCTM 475. Prerequisite: HCI 465 and permission of instructor.

HCI 485 Healthcare Informatics Capstone • 5 Cr.

This course provides students the opportunity to demonstrate mastery of program curriculum through development of a research question, completion of a literature review, and successful submission of a scholarly paper. Previously HCTM 485. Prerequisite: HCI 465 and permission of instructor.

HCI 494 Special Topics • 5 Cr.

Presents advanced or specialized topics in the field of Healthcare Informatics. Topics focus on new and emerging trends in healthcare informatics. Specific topics are announced in the quarterly schedule. Prerequisite: Admission into the program. Previously HCTM 494.

HCI 495 Special Topics • 5 Cr.

Presents advanced or specialized topics in the field of Healthcare Informatics. Topics focus on new and emerging trends in healthcare informatics. Specific topics are announced in the quarterly schedule. Prerequisite: Admission into the program. Previously HCTM 495.

HCI 496 Special Topics • 5 Cr.

Presents advanced or specialized topics in the field of Healthcare Informatics. Topics focus on new and emerging trends in healthcare informatics. Specific topics are announced in the quarterly schedule. Prerequisite: Admission into the program. Previously HCTM 496.

HCI 497 Special Topics • 5 Cr.

Presents advanced or specialized topics in the field of Healthcare Informatics. Topics focus on new and emerging trends in healthcare informatics. Specific topics are announced in the quarterly schedule. Prerequisite: Admission into the program. Previously HCTM 497.

HCML 301 Essential Foundations of Healthcare Management • 5 Cr.

Examines the foundational concepts of healthcare management and leadership. This introduction to healthcare systems and the role of the manager includes leadership theory, interpersonal and technical skills, and legal and regulatory issues. Course covers: critical thinking, scholarly writing, communication, and leadership skills at the BAS level, as well as the relationship between research, theory, and evidence-based practice. Case studies are used to bring a contextual focus on organizations in the healthcare. Prerequisite: Acceptance to the program program, or permission of instructor.

HCML 310 Health Information Systems for HC Managers • 5 Cr.

Explores the types of Health Information Systems (HIS) as well as associated regulations and standards from a management perspective. Students will evaluate the various information technology (IT), roles of, and terminology used by HIS professionals. Examines stakeholder participation in the selection, application, and management of clinical and administrative health information systems. Prerequisite: Acceptance to the program or permission of instructor.

HCML 320 Finance & Accounting for Healthcare Managers • 5 Cr.

Addresses issues of financial management in healthcare systems, including budget development and analysis, equipment purchase and depreciation, salaries and benefits, and coding and reimbursement. Case studies are used to bring a contextual focus on specific healthcare departments and organizations including multinational aspects and parameters of outsourcing. Prerequisite: Acceptance to the program or permission of instructor. Previously RAIM 320.

HCML 325 Organizational Theory & Behavior in Healthcare • 5 Cr.

Presents theory and practice of how organizational design affects group and interpersonal interactions as it applies to healthcare. Includes organizational structures, culture, and change management. Case studies used to bring contextual focus on specific departments and organizations in the global healthcare industry. Prerequisite: Acceptance to the program or permission of instructor. Previously RAIM 325.

HCML 340 Human Resources Management in Healthcare • 5 Cr.

Examines laws, regulations and practices relating to employment in healthcare settings, including requirements for staffing, evaluating employee performance, career development, union relationships, health, safety security, diversity issues, probation and dismissal. Case studies are used to bring a contextual focus on specific departments and organizations in a global healthcare industry. Prerequisite: Acceptance to the program or permission of instructor. Previously RAIM 340.

HCML 350 Legal & Regulatory Aspects of Healthcare • 5 Cr.

Covers laws and regulations pertaining to healthcare. Topics include contracts with equipment vendors, HIPAA and Stark laws, and insurance. Case studies are used to bring a contextual focus on specific departments and organizations in the healthcare industry. Prerequisite: Acceptance to the program or permission of instructor. Previously RAIM 350.

HCML 375 Project Management for Healthcare Managers • 5 Cr.

Examines project management theory and practice with emphasis on project management in healthcare settings. Students will evaluate tools used to develop and manage healthcare projects common for the healthcare manager and apply appropriate tools for developing a project based on a case study. Prerequisite: Acceptance to the program or permission of instructor.

HCML 380 Revenue Cycle in Healthcare • 5 Cr.

Students will review the people, processes, and technology used during each phase of the reimbursement cycle. Students will use research tools to evaluate best practices in revenue cycle management to make effective management decisions. Prerequisite: HCML 301 with a C or better and admission to the program, or permission of Program Chair.

HCML 399 Independent Study • V1-5 Cr.

Covers directed readings, special projects, and independent study by an individual student. Only one of these courses may be taken for credit: RAIM 399 or HCML 399. Prerequisite: permission of instructor. Previously RAIM 399.

HCML 401 Marketing in Healthcare Environment • 5 Cr.

Covers marketing in healthcare including aspects of business-to-business and business-to-customer. Topics include marketing strategies, cost benefit analysis, and assessment of success of marketing campaigns. Case studies are used to bring a contextual focus on specific departments and organizations in the global healthcare industry. Prerequisite: Acceptance to the program or permission of instructor. Previously RAIM 401.

HCML 411 Institutional Quality Management & Accreditation • 5 Cr.

Covers principles of total quality management including quality assurance and quality control. Includes management of hospital and departmental accreditation including interpretation of accreditation standards, design of processes to address standards, and preparation for a site visit. Case studies are used to bring a contextual focus on healthcare. Previously RAIT 495, RAIM 410, RAIM 411. Only one of these courses may be taken for credit: RAIT 495, RAIM 410, RAIM 411 or HCML 411. Prerequisite: Acceptance into the program or permission of instructor.

HCML 415 Strategic Operations Management in Healthcare • 5 Cr.

This course is designed to address key operations issues in large as well as small/medium healthcare organizations. These issues include both strategic and design decisions, and as such make evidence-based operations management an inter-functional concern that requires cross-functional understanding and coordination. A blend of theory, cases, analytical techniques, business examples, videos, online simulation, and class discussions will be used to fulfill the course outcomes. Prerequisite: Acceptance to the program or permission of Program Chair. Recommended: HCML 411 or RAIM 411.

HCML 420 Managerial Perspectives in Global Health • 5 Cr.

This course is designed to provide an understanding of global health concerns from a socioeconomic, biological, and environmental perspective. Global health topics will cover infectious diseases, nutrition, maternal health, non-communicable diseases, mental health, and injuries. Prerequisite: Acceptance to the program or permission of Program Chair.

HCML 440 Business Planning in Healthcare • 5 Cr.

Covers planning and developing a business venture within the healthcare industry. Includes plan development, pro-forma budget, estimates of market audience and planning, sources of financing, tracking response and success. Case studies are used to bring a contextual focus on specific departments and organizations in the healthcare industry. Previously RAIM 440. Prerequisites: RAIM 401 or HCML 401 with a C or better and admission to the program, or permission of Program Chair.

HCML 460 Management & Leadership in Healthcare • 5 Cr.

Prepares students for leadership roles in healthcare. Topics include relations with diverse and/or remotely located staff, global and virtual employees, communication skills for managers, time management, motivating employees, and conflict resolution. Case studies are used to bring a contextual focus on specific departments and organizations in a global healthcare industry. Prerequisite: Acceptance to the program or permission of instructor. Previously RAIM 460.

HCML 465 Capstone Proposal • 1 Cr.

This course prepares students for the HCML Capstone course (HCML 475). Students will prepare professional goals, objectives as well as their mission, vision and career strategic plan in order to ensure that work done in the capstone project support individual career goals. Prerequisite: Acceptance into HCML program and permission of instructor.

HCML 466 FIELD STUDIES ORIENTATION • 1 Cr.

This course prepares students for the HCML Field Studies course (HCML 476). Students will prepare professional goals and objectives as well as a mission, vision and career strategic plan in order to ensure that work done in Field Studies supports individual career goals. Prerequisite: Acceptance into HCML program and permission of instructor.

HCML 475 Capstone Project • 4 Cr.

Students review, integrate and practice the skills and knowledge covered throughout their BAS Program. Students select a complete and significant project drawn from case studies involving both management components. Previously RAIM 475. Prerequisite: Acceptance into HCML or RAIS programs and HCML 465 with a C (2.0) or better, or permission of instructor.

HCML 476 Field Studies • 4 Cr.

This course provides students with the opportunity to gain a deeper understanding of the healthcare environment through industry internship or practicum. Only one of these courses may be taken for credit: HCTM 475 or HCML 476. Prerequisite: Acceptance into HCML or RAIS programs and HCML 466 with a C (2.0) or better, or permission of instructor.

HCML 494 Special Topics • V1-5 Cr.

Presents advanced or specialized topics in healthcare management. Topics focus on new and emerging trends. Examples include Lean Thinking, leadership, economics, etc. Specific topics are announced in the quarterly schedule. Previously RAIM 494. Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor.

HCML 495 Special Topics • V1-5 Cr.

Presents advanced or specialized topics in healthcare management. Topics focus on new and emerging trends. Examples include Lean Thinking, leadership, economics, etc. Specific topics are announced in the quarterly schedule. Previously RAIM 495. Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor.

HCML 496 Special Topics • V1-5 Cr.

Presents advanced or specialized topics in healthcare management. Topics focus on new and emerging trends. Examples include Lean Thinking, leadership, economics, etc. Specific topics are announced in the quarterly schedule. Previously RAIM 496. Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor.

HCML 497 Special Topics • V1-5 Cr.

Presents advanced or specialized topics in healthcare management. Topics focus on new and emerging trends. Examples include Lean Thinking, leadership, economics, etc. Specific topics are announced in the quarterly schedule. Previously RAIM 497. Prerequisite: Acceptance into HCML program or permission of the instructor.

HCTM 293 HCI - New Student Orientation • 2 Cr.

This course prepares students in the Healthcare Informatics program for transition into baccalaureate-level study. Students gain an understanding of program expectations, campus resources, and strategies for success in an online learning environment. Additionally, students make connections with HCI faculty, staff and peers, develop CANVAS skills and establish a learning portfolio for their BAS degree. Prerequisite: Admission to HCI program or instructor permission.

HCTM 301 US Healthcare Policies and Delivery Systems • 5 Cr.

Introduction to healthcare systems in the United States. Students will identify laws, regulations, standards, initiatives, and payment systems; learn the impact of policies and procedures applicable to the various healthcare organizations; and gain an appreciation of the roles and disciplines of providers throughout the US healthcare system. Includes comparison of the national and international healthcare systems. Prerequisite: Acceptance into program or permission of instructor.

HCTM 302 Healthcare Safety, Quality and Legal Environment • 5 Cr.

Covers general safety and quality processes in the healthcare system, including the business, clinical, and delivery processes, the legislative, regulatory, and accreditation processes, laws, regulations, and policies and procedures pertaining to patient safety, healthcare quality, data confidentiality, privacy, release of information, and professional and practice-related ethical issues. Prerequisite: Acceptance into program or permission of instructor.

HCTM 310 Essentials of Healthcare Informatics • 5 Cr.

Examines the architecture, components and applications of healthcare information systems, including electronic medical records, health information exchange, medical patient diagnostic, monitoring and therapeutic devices and systems, lab and pharmacy systems, computerized provider order entry, and decision support systems. Also looks at trends in health information technologies and applications, and healthcare enterprise. Prerequisite: Acceptance into program or permission of instructor.

HCTM 315 Electronic Health Records • 5 Cr.

Provides students with a broad overview of electronic health record (EHR) design, implementation, and use of EHRs. Includes promises and pitfalls of EHRs, role of EHR in improving care quality and safety, and pros and cons of different EHR design. Government and regulatory agency requirements for EHR implementation and use will be covered along with the role of EHR users in design and implementation. Prerequisite: Admission to HCTM BAS program and HCTM 310, or permission of instructor.

HCTM 320 HCI Data Standards & Interoperability • 5 Cr.

Covers standards designed to enable interoperability of healthcare information systems. Includes benefits and challenges of healthcare systems interoperability along with data standards (HL7 v2, HL7 v3 RIM, CDA, SNOMED) that support interoperability. Students will learn how data standards are incorporated into national regulations and health information exchange. Prerequisite: Admission to program and HCTM 310 or permission of instructor.

HCTM 350 Usability & User-Centered Design in Healthcare • 5 Cr.

This course covers the role of human factors, usability, and user centered design in healthcare. Presents the impact of clinical information system design and usability on risk for medical errors. Students will evaluate usability testing methods appropriate for the type of healthcare setting and user characteristics along with system redesign to improve usability. Prerequisites: HCTM 310 and HCTM 315, or permission of the instructor.

HCTM 375 Healthcare Informatics Project Management • 5 Cr.

Examines project management theory and practice with emphasis on project management in healthcare IT settings. Students will evaluate tools used to develop and manage healthcare IT projects and select appropriate tools for developing a project based on a case study. Prerequisite: Acceptance into program or permission of instructor.

HCTM 380 Healthcare Code Sets and Clinical Terminologies • 5 Cr.

Covers structured terminology systems currently in use in healthcare settings, including medical, nursing, laboratory and other allied health terminologies. Includes historical development and use of terminologies, revision processes, use in electronic health records as well as requirements for statistical reporting. Prerequisite: Acceptance into program or permission of instructor.

HCTM 385 Consumer Health Informatics • 5 Cr.

This course focuses on consumer healthcare information needs, information seeking behaviors and information sources. Topics include social networks, patient portals and information sources focused on health conditions. Additional focus will be given to development, use and regulation of personal health records as well as evaluation of health condition specific information available on the web. Prerequisite: HCTM 310 and acceptance to program. Alternatively, instructor permission.

HCTM 390 Healthcare Information Seeking & Evaluation • 3 Cr.

Covers theory and practices related to health information seeking and evaluation. Includes determination of information needs by healthcare professionals and consumers, conversion of a given information need into a searchable question, selection of appropriate search tools, conducting the information search, and evaluating search results. Prerequisite: HCTM 310 and admission to HCTM BAS program.

HCTM 405 Health & Information Literacy • 5 Cr.

Healthcare informatics professionals are at the forefront of current initiatives aimed at providing consumer-centric healthcare. Success of these initiatives depends on thorough understanding of concepts associated with health and information literacy. Students will develop skills needed to assess health and information literacy, locate, evaluate and effectively use information appropriate to meet consumer health information needs. Prerequisite: HCTM 390. Recommended: permission of instructor.

HCTM 410 Healthcare Clinical Systems Analysis • 5 Cr.

Presents strategies and tools for systems analysis and the development of user and systems requirements. Emphasis is on capturing and evaluating the needs of various stakeholders including physicians, nurses, patients, and caregivers, as well as meeting health information technology general practices and regulations, and covers techniques to analyze and model healthcare processes. Prerequisite: Acceptance into program, and completion of fundamentals pathway (IT 103, BTS 168 and BUSIT 103) or (HCTM 301, HCTM 302 and HCTM 380).

HCTM 420 HIT Systems Integration and Interoperability • 5 Cr.

Covers the details of healthcare technology standards and interoperability, as well as the processes to develop an integration plan, including systems customization, test plans, unit integration and system testing, and identification of roles and responsibilities of internal and external professionals during the integration phase. Prerequisite: Acceptance into program, and completion of fundamentals pathway (IT 103, BTS 168 and BUSIT 103) or (HCTM 301, HCTM 302 and HCTM 380).

HCTM 430 Healthcare Information Systems Implementation • 4 Cr.

Covers the implementation of information systems within healthcare organizations, as well as documentation and reporting. Includes development of an implementation plan, systems customization, configuration and testing, user training, key issues confronting organization and management of healthcare systems, best practices, and adherence to healthcare standards and regulations. Prerequisite: Acceptance into program or permission of instructor.

HCTM 435 Healthcare Clinical Information System Operation • 5 Cr.

Covers all aspects of healthcare clinical information system implementation and administration to include documentation and reporting. Includes vendor selection, implementation planning, system customization, configuration and testing, user training, key issues confronting organization and management of healthcare systems, best practices, and adherence to healthcare standards and regulations. Prerequisite: HCTM 310, HCTM 315. Recommended: Admission to HCTM BAS program.

HCTM 440 Healthcare Systems Operation and Administration • 4 Cr.

Covers basic strategies to perform systems operation, administration and reporting with an emphasis on systems and data integrity and security. Topics include performance monitoring, systems testing and troubleshooting, maintenance, upgrades, security enhancements and process changes, management of contingency and emergency recovery plans, report generation and health information technology best practices and compliance. Prerequisite: Acceptance into program or permission of instructor.

HCTM 450 Healthcare Analytics and Quality • 5 Cr.

Explores the scope and role of data and data analytics in healthcare in the context of national quality policies, as articulated in Meaningful Use Stages 1 and 2, and the National Quality Forum metrics that have been selected for Accountable Care Organization assessment and rewards, Health Information Technology for Economic and Clinical Health (HITECH) Act, and the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (PPACA). Prerequisite: Acceptance into program or permission of instructor.

HCTM 460 Leading Change in Healthcare Informatics • 5 Cr.

Prepares students for leadership roles in healthcare informatics. Covers leadership characteristics, roles and responsibilities in healthcare informatics. Topics include leadership theories, responsibilities, and skills. Addresses the unique role of leaders in managing transformational change in healthcare informatics. Students will assess their own leadership skills and develop plans for lifelong learning as leaders in healthcare informatics. Prerequisite: Acceptance into program and HCTM 310, or permission of the instructor.

HCTM 465 HCTM Capstone Orientation • 2 Cr.

This course prepares students for the HCTM Capstone and Field Studies courses. Students will prepare professional goals, objectives as well as their mission, vision and career strategic plan in order to ensure that work done in Field Studies and Capstone support individual career goals. Prerequisite: Acceptance into program and permission of instructor.

HCTM 470 Healthcare Data Analytics Applications • 5 Cr.

Students analyze strategies, benefits and limitations of data analytics in various healthcare environments. In the context of case studies, they evaluate, select and apply analytics tools and methods to develop meaningful information in support of key clinical, operational and financial decisions. Current and emerging analytics practices and metrics are discussed. Prerequisite: Acceptance into program and completion of HCTM 450 with a C or above, or permission of instructor.

HCTM 475 HCTM Field Studies • 4 Cr.

This course provides students with the opportunity to gain a deeper understanding of the healthcare environment through industry internship or practicum. Prerequisite: HCTM 465 or permission of instructor.

HCTM 485 Healthcare Informatics Capstone • 4 Cr.

The capstone project course is the culmination of the Health Information Technology BAS program and demonstrates to faculty a student's mastery of the curriculum, general education skills and core competencies in the healthcare informatics field. Students, working in small groups, complete a comprehensive project selected at beginning of course. Prerequisite: Acceptance into program and permission of instructor.

HCTM 494 Healthcare Informatics Special Topics • 5 Cr.

Presents advanced or specialized topics in the field of Health Information Technology. Topics focus on new and emerging trends in health information technology. Examples include public health information technology; public policies as they relate to health information technology; telemedicine; mobile devices in healthcare; etc. Specific topics are announced in the quarterly schedule. Prerequisite: Acceptance into program and permission of instructor.

HCTM 495 Healthcare Informatics Special Topics • 5 Cr.

Presents advanced or specialized topics in the field of Health Information Technology. Topics focus on new and emerging trends in health information technology. Examples include public health information technology; public policies as they relate to health information technology; telemedicine; mobile devices in healthcare; etc. Specific topics are announced in the quarterly schedule. Prerequisite: Acceptance into program and permission of instructor.

HCTM 496 Healthcare Informatics Special Topics • 5 Cr.

Presents advanced or specialized topics in the field of Health Information Technology. Topics focus on new and emerging trends in health information technology. Examples include public health information technology; public policies as they relate to health information technology; telemedicine; mobile devices in healthcare; etc. Specific topics are announced in the quarterly schedule. Prerequisite: Acceptance into program and permission of instructor.

HCTM 497 Healthcare Informatics Special Topics • 5 Cr.

Presents advanced or specialized topics in the field of Health Information Technology. Topics focus on new and emerging trends in health information technology. Examples include public health information technology; public policies as they relate to health information technology; telemedicine; mobile devices in healthcare; etc. Specific topics are announced in the quarterly schedule. Prerequisite: Acceptance into program and permission of instructor.

HD 100 First Year Experience • V1-2 Cr.

Develops a better understanding of the learning process and essential academic success skills and abilities. Topics include use of information resources, study skills, learning styles, personal responsibility, career resources, intercultural competence, and development of personal education plan. Mandatory in the first quarter of attendance for first-time-to college students enrolled for 10 or more credits. Course graded credit/no credit only.

HD 101 Healthy Self-Esteem • V1-3 Cr.

Explores theory and practice of positive self-image through small-group discussion, self-assessments, and multi-media content. Students focus on understanding their behaviors as a reflection of their self-concept.

HD 103 International Student First Year Experience • 2 Cr.

Provides international students new to the American college system the knowledge and skills necessary to succeed in the U.S. higher education environment. Required for all new-to-American college students enrolled in ten or more credits. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.

HD 110 Stress Management • V1-3 Cr.

Presents methods and benefits of managing stress. Students learn to identify stress, become aware of stress sources, and understand the results of stress in terms of thoughts, feelings, and actions. Students discuss and practice various methods for reducing unwanted stresses.

HD 112 Selecting a College Major • 2 Cr.

Students select a college major through an orderly, rational approach. Topics include exploring self, making commitments, implementing decisions and possible majors using on-line research as well as small group discussion. Prerequisite: Recommended 30 college credits.

HD 120 Learning Strategies for Student Success • V1-5 Cr.

Develops skills that support successful college work. Students practice effective study techniques and learning strategies, and explore resources available on campus. Recommended: placement in ENGL 089 or above.

HD 125 Motivation and Empowerment • V1-3 Cr.

Students identify and analyze unique sources of motivation to improve attainment of goals in academic and personal realms of life. Students critically examine their strengths, values, and goals. Students develop tools for taking personal responsibility, and accessing intrinsic sources of motivation to reach their highest potential in school and life.

HD 131 Understanding Personal Relationships • 2 Cr.

Explores personal growth through the development of interpersonal skills. Facilitates learning and growth in areas of cultural awareness and appreciation of differences, respectful communication resolution of interpersonal conflict.

HD 140 U.S. Race Relations • 3 Cr.

Students have the opportunity to critically examine the impact of racism and white privilege in the U.S. Students learn about themselves as racial beings and are taught how to engage in cross-racial dialogues about race and become active change agents in a multicultural society.

HD 157 Assertive Communication • V1-3 Cr.

Develops awareness of personal communication styles and choices. Students practice skills that enable them to communicate directly and to get their needs met without denying the rights of others.

HD 173 Career Exploration • V1-5 Cr.

Presents concepts and skills relating to career planning. Topics include self-assessment (interests, personality, and skills inventory), values, and learning styles; relating careers to educational and training options; researching jobs and careers; and decision-making and goal setting.

HD 180 Skills for Navigating College & Career • 2 Cr.

Introduce and explore four areas which may be difficult for students: executive functioning, social interaction, self-advocacy and self-regulation. This includes learning to identify strengths and weaknesses, as well as strategies for success. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor, cohort class.

HD 181 Self-Advocacy • 2 Cr.

Expand on information learned in HD 180: Skills for Navigating College & Career class regarding self-advocacy. Presents concepts and skills related to self-advocacy. Students learn to identify when, where, how and to whom to advocate. Students discuss current community and personal events, and the impact this has on their lives and work. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor, cohort class.

HD 182 Executive Functioning • 2 Cr.

Expand on information learned in HD 180: Skills for Navigating College & Career class. Explores executive functioning which includes planning, organizing, strategizing, paying attention to and remembering details, and managing time and space. Learn to use strengths to obtain real-life success at school, work and in relationships. Gain a deeper understanding of how one's executive functioning profile can be an asset in certain tasks and types of work. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor, cohort class.

HD 185 Managing Career Change • V1-7 Cr.

Assists workforce training students in making career transitions. Module topics are career exploration, job search, education/training orientation, and study skills. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.

HD 190 Staying on Track • V1-5 Cr.

Helps students of color and students from nontraditional backgrounds succeed in college. Students develop skills needed to reach their educational objectives and to enhance their personal and cultural identity. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.

HD 194 Special Topics in Human Development • V1-10 Cr.

Covers supplementary, self-supporting, or televised courses. Topics are announced in the class schedule.

HD 195 Special Topics in Human Development • V1-10 Cr.

Covers supplementary, self-supporting, or televised courses. Topics are announced in the class schedule.

HD 196 Special Topics in Human Development • V1-10 Cr.

Covers supplementary, self-supporting, or televised courses. Topics are announced in the class schedule.

HD 197 Special Topics in Human Development • V1-10 Cr.

Covers supplementary, self-supporting, or televised courses. Topics are announced in the class schedule.

HD 199 Individual Studies in Human Development • V1-5 Cr.

Covers directed readings, special projects, and independent study by an individual student. May be repeated for a maximum of 15 credits. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.

HD 210 Leadership Today: Creating a Vision for Tomorrow • 2 Cr.

An introduction to the practical leadership skills and tools including leadership assessment, ethical decision-making, conflict resolution team building, and other leadership competencies.

HD 211 Leadership Today: Building Tools for Tomorrow • 2 Cr.

Course covers dealing with difficult people, the art of listening, negotiation, problem solving, and other leadership competencies.

HD 212 Inclusive Leadership • 2 Cr.

Leaders must answer the greatest challenge of our times - how should we engage, involve, and inspire those who have different life experiences, values, and world view to create safe, inclusive, and mutually beneficial communities and societies globally?

HD 215 Strategic Leadership Listening to the Future • 2 Cr.

Leaders create alternative futures for a hypothetical industry case. Covers the analysis of uncertainties and the influence of social, technological, economic, environmental and economic forces leading to a set of scenarios applicable to risk evaluation & competitive positioning, contingency planning and thought leadership.

HD 216 Fundamentals of Leadership • 2 Cr.  New

Description starting Summer 2018

Leadership skills and abilities are a valuable set of attributes for any career path. This seminar-style course is designed to provide a context in which to develop concrete organizational leadership, presentation, and communication skills sufficient to participate in leadership roles on campus, community, and industry.

HIST 101 History of Civilization: Cultural Traditions • 5 Cr.

Surveys the development of civilizations from ancient times to approximately 1000 CE. Topics include Mesopotamia, Egypt, India, China, Greece, Rome, and the rise of agriculture, cities, empires and major world religions. May be used as social science or humanities credit, not both, at BC.

HIST 102 History of Civilization: Middle Ages • 5 Cr.

Surveys world civilization from approximately 500 CE to the French Revolution. Topics include the fall of Rome, the rise of major world religions, medieval institutions, the Renaissance, the rise of science, and the age of exploration. May be used as social science or humanities credit, not both, at BC.

HIST 103 History of Civilization: Contemporary World • 5 Cr.

Surveys world history since the Enlightenment. Topics include major political revolutions and ideologies, the Industrial Revolution, imperialism, the origins and impact of the World Wars, the rise of nation states, the Cold War, and increasing global connections. May be used as social science or humanities credit, not both, at BC.

HIST 110 English History to 1603 • 5 Cr.

Surveys the history of the British Isles from the Roman conquest to the reigns of Henry VIII and Elizabeth I. Topics include life and culture in the Middle Ages, the Hundred Year?s War, the rise of Parliament, and the English Reformation. May be used as social science or humanities credit, not both, at BC.

HIST 115 English History 1603 to Present • 5 Cr.

Surveys the history of the British Isles from the death of Elizabeth I to the present. Topics include the development of Parliament, civil war, political reform, the industrial revolution, the world wars and cold war, and the growth and decline of British imperial power. May be used as social science or humanities credit, not both, at BC.

HIST 120 Global History • 5 Cr.

Surveys comparative global history, focusing on the relationships between cultures. Students investigate global developments in religion, law, and technology as well as the rise and fall of empires and cultures. May be used as social science or humanities credit, not both, at BC. Same as INTST 204. Either HIST 120 or INTST 204 may be taken for credit, not both.

HIST& 146 US History I • 5 Cr.

Surveys the history of North America in the colonial era. Topics include the establishment of European colonies, relations between colonists and Native Americans, the development of slavery, economic and social developments, the relationship with the British Empire, the Revolutionary War, and the emergence of the U.S. May be used as social science or humanities credit, not both, at BC.

HIST& 147 US History II • 5 Cr.

Surveys the history of the U.S. from the ratification of the Constitution to the end of the nineteenth century. Topics include Native American-white relations, slavery, territorial expansion, the Civil War, and economic, social and political developments. May be used as social science or humanities credit, not both, at BC.

HIST& 148 US History III • 5 Cr.

Surveys the history of the U.S. during the twentieth century. Topics include reform movements, the world wars, the Cold War, Civil Rights activism, feminism, and economic, social and political developments. May be used as social science or humanities credit, not both, at BC.

HIST 150 African American History • 5 Cr.

Surveys the history of African Americans from the slave trade to present. Topics include African origins, construction of racial identity, slavery, emancipation, formation of post-emancipation communities, war and migration, the Harlem Renaissance, and civil rights activism. May be used as social science or humanities credit, not both, at BC.

HIST 185 History of Latin America • 5 Cr.

Survey of the social history, political development, and cultural contributions of Latin America. Topics include ancient indigenous civilizations of Central and South America, Spanish and Portuguese colonization, revolutions for independence, the building of nation-states, ethnic diversity, and present-day patterns of migration and globalization. May be used as social science or humanities credit, not both, at BC.

HIST 194 Special Topics in History • V1-10 Cr.

Covers supplementary or unusual classes related to the field. Topics are announced in the class schedule.

HIST 195 Special Topics in History • V1-10 Cr.

Covers supplementary or unusual classes related to the field. Topics are announced in the class schedule.

HIST 196 Special Topics in History • V1-10 Cr.

Covers supplementary or unusual classes related to the field. Topics are announced in the class schedule.

HIST 197 Special Topics in History • V1-10 Cr.

Covers supplementary or unusual classes related to the field. Topics are announced in the class schedule.

HIST 198 Seminar in History • V1-10 Cr.

Includes seminars, workshops, etc., for which college credit is offered.

HIST 199 Individual Studies in History • V1-10 Cr.

Covers directed readings, special projects, and independent study by an individual student. May be repeated for a maximum of 15 credits. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.

HIST 205 History of World War II • 5 Cr.

Explores the causes and consequences of World War II. Topics include the major political, social, economic, military, environmental, technological, and cultural aspects of the broad history of World War II in the period from the end of World War I to the end of World War II and the beginning of the cold War. May be used as social science or humanities credit, not both, at BC. Recommended: Completion of ENGL& 101.

HIST 207 Introduction to Intellectual History • 5 Cr.

Surveys the major currents of modern western thought. Students examine assumptions and ideas about the nature of the cosmos and humanity before and after the Reformation. Topics include the Scientific Revolution, the Enlightenment, 19th-century ideologies, and the philosophical crisis of the 20th century. May be used as social science or humanities credit, not both, at BC.

HIST 209 History of Christianity • 5 Cr.

Explores the beginnings of the Christian church, the impact of Christian teaching and organization on the West, and the challenge of other religions and philosophies. Traces the spread of Christianity in the non-Western world and assesses its role in American culture in the modern era. May be used as social science or humanities credit, not both, at BC.

HIST 210 History of Modern Asia • 5 Cr.

Examines the roles of China, India, Japan, Korea, and Southeast Asia in 20th century economic, political, and cultural affairs. Topics include the region?s cultures and its emergence from the age of colonial rule to modern independent states. May be used as social science or humanities credit, not both, at BC.

HIST 211 History of Ancient Rome • 5 Cr.

Explores the military, political, and economic factors behind the rise of Rome. Topics include the development of Roman legal and social systems, the role of slavery, conquest and expansion, transition from republic to empire, the Roman military, the rise of Christianity, and the eventual fall of the empire. May be used as social science or humanities credit, not both, at BC.

HIST 212 Sport in America: A Social History • 5 Cr.

Surveys the role of sports in American society. Topics include the historical development of games and sports, with an emphasis on the intersections between organized sports and American society and culture. May be used as social science or humanities credit, not both, at BC.

HIST& 214 Pacific Northwest History • 5 Cr.

Surveys major historical developments in the Pacific Northwest from the late 1700s to the present. Examines relations between whites, Native Americans, and other groups, changing relationships between people and the environment, and relations between the region and international and national political, economic and social developments. May be used as social science or humanities credit, not both, at BC.

HIST 223 History of Russia & Eastern Europe 1500 to Pres • 5 Cr.

Surveys the social, political, and economic history of Russia and Eastern Europe from 1500 to the present, with special emphasis on Russia from the early-modern to the modern period. May be used as social science or humanities credit, not both, at BC.

HIST 230 Revolutions in the Modern World • 5 Cr.

Studies the forces that produce significant changes in a nation's social, economic, or political ideas and institutions. Students analyze "revolutions" such as those in England, America, France, Russia, and China. Same as POLS 230 (prev POLSC 230). Either HIST 230 or POLS 230 may be taken for credit, not both. May be used as social science or humanities credit, not both, at BC.

HIST 236 History of Australia • 5 Cr.

Examines the history of Australia from the first human inhabitants 40,000 years ago through the long and difficult process to become the modern continent nation of Australia. Attention is given to the various groups who have migrated to Australia, the exploration and colonization of the continent, the gold rushes and bushrangers, the creation of a federation, and the emergence of the modern Australian nation during the 20th century. Fulfills social science or humanities course requirement, not both, at BC.

HIST 242 The Age of Exploration & Discovery • 5 Cr.

Examines the role of exploration in world history. Topics include the factors encouraging exploration and discovery from medieval to modern times, as well as the social, environmental, economic, and political results of cultural contact. May be used as social science or humanities credit, not both, at BC.

HIST 245 The U.S. in World Affairs 1898 to Present • 5 Cr.

Examines U.S. relations with the rest of the world since 1898. Topics include external and internal factors influencing foreign policy, the development of an overseas empire, the world wars, the Cold War, the rise to superpower status, globalization, and challenges in the post-Cold War world. May be used as social science or humanities credit, not both, at BC.

HIST 246 History of Immigration to the US • 5 Cr.

This course explores the history of immigration to the United States from the colonial period to the present day. It examines the forces shaping immigration, the diversity of immigrant experiences, the legal/policy framework influencing immigration, and the impact of immigration on U.S. society and culture. May be used as social science or humanities credit, not both, at BC. Recommended: Completion of ENGL& 101.

HIST 250 U.S. Military History • 5 Cr.

Surveys the development of the U.S. military from the colonial era to the present. Examines the military?s role in major conflicts, civilian-military relations, and the social, cultural, political, and technological influences on the military?s development. May be used as social science or humanities credit, not both, at BC.

HIST 261 The Middle East in the Islamic Era • 5 Cr.

Examines the political, social, and cultural history of the Middle East since the 7th century. Topics include the development of Islam, the rise and decline of Islamic empires, and the impact of modernization, the Arab-Israeli confrontation, and Islamic fundamentalism. Same as INTST 261. Either HIST 261 or INTST 261 may be taken for credit, not both. May be used as a social science or humanities credit, not both, at BC.

HIST 280 History of Africa • 5 Cr.

Examines the history of the continent from the origins of the human species to the present. Topics include the rise and fall of ancient kingdoms and civilizations, the impact of the wider world from Greek and Roman times to the 20th century, and Africa's role in international affairs. Same as INTST 280. Either HIST 280 or INTST 280 may be taken for credit, not both. May be used as social science or humanities credit, not both, at BC.

HIST 294 Special Topics in History • V1-10 Cr.

Covers supplementary or unusual classes related to the field. Topics are announced in the class schedule.

HIST 295 Special Topics in History • V1-10 Cr.

Covers supplementary or unusual classes related to the field. Topics are announced in the class schedule.

HIST 296 Special Topics in History • V1-10 Cr.

Covers supplementary or unusual classes related to the field. Topics are announced in the class schedule.

HIST 297 Special Topics in History • V1-10 Cr.

Covers supplementary or unusual classes related to the field. Topics are announced in the class schedule.

HIST 298 Seminar in History • V1-10 Cr.

Includes seminars, workshops, etc., for which college credit is offered.

HIST 299 Individual Studies in History • V1-10 Cr.

Covers directed readings, special projects, and independent study by an individual student. May be repeated for a maximum of 15 credits. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.

HLTH 030 Phlebotomy Basics • 1.4 Cr.

No class description found.

HLTH 041 Phlebotomy 2 ASCP • 2.5 Cr.

No class description found.

HLTH 145 Wellness for Healthcare • 3 Cr.

Covers the social, emotional and physical components of wellness with a focus on personal assessment and tools to design a wellness plan for life. Students explore methods for promoting health in the healthcare setting.

HLTH 220 Wellness for Educators • 3 Cr.

Covers the social, emotional and physical components of wellness with a focus on personal assessment and tools to design a wellness plan for life. Students explore methods for promoting health in the elementary and preschool classroom.

HLTH 222 Drugs & Society • V1-5 Cr.

Covers the nature of steroids, pain relievers, alcohol and other psychoactive drugs. Includes ingestion, absorption, action and interaction, and metabolism. Students discuss physiological and psychoactive drugs on the individual and the consequences of use and abuse.

HLTH 224 Wellness Coaching • 2 Cr.

Provides an overview of effective wellness coaching techniques that promote long-term healthy lifestyle choices for both individual clients and groups.

HLTH 250 Wellness • 5 Cr.

Approaches wellness from a holistic health perspective. Students learn to become informed consumers. Discussion topics include emotional and physical health and well-being, marriage and family, communicable and degenerative diseases, and drugs.

HLTH 260 Wilderness First Aid Basics • 4 Cr.

Prepares students to respond to emergencies that may occur during back country fitness activities. Students take exams for both the Standard Red Cross First Aid Certificate and Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation (CPR) Certificate.

HLTH 262 Person Fit Trainer First Aid & Athletic Training • 5 Cr.

Expands on knowledge and skills gained through Adult CPR, AED and First Aid certification. Covers care, management, and prevention of injuries and illnesses common in fitness and athletic arenas. Practice and demonstration of training skills include injuries to muscles, joints, bones, spine and head. Meets requirements for Personal Fitness Trainer certificate.

HLTH 290 Introduction to Sports Nutrition • V1-3 Cr.

An introduction to the energy systems used during physical activity. Specialized attention to the body's ability to perform under aerobic and anaerobic conditions. Identification of energy, macronutrient, fluid and electrolyte needs during activity. Food sources and Sport specific case studies will be discussed. Personal application of material will be emphasized in class. Recommended: High School Algebra.

HLTH 292 First Aid & CPR Taking Action • 4 Cr.

Helps prepare students for both a Standard Red Cross First Aid Certificate and Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation (CPR) Certificate. Lecture/lab format.

HLTH 294 Special Topics in Health • V1-5 Cr.

Students explore specific issues in personal health, with emphasis on practical application of theory. Topics are announced in the class schedule.

HLTH 295 Special Topics in Health • V1-5 Cr.

Students explore specific issues in personal health, with emphasis on practical application of theory. Topics are announced in the class schedule.

HLTH 296 Special Topics in Health • V1-5 Cr.

Students explore specific issues in personal health, with emphasis on practical application of theory. Topics are announced in the class schedule.

HLTH 297 Special Topics in Health • V1-5 Cr.

Students explore specific issues in personal health, with emphasis on practical application of theory. Topics are announced in the class schedule.

HPM 325 Foundation of Health Promotion • 6 Cr.

Examines the theories, policies and principles of health promotion. Topics include identifying community needs, delivering custom programs, researching and evaluating health trends and locating employment potential. Prerequisite: Admission to the BAS Health Promotion and Management program at Bellevue College.

HPM 330 Leadership in Outdoor Pursuits • 4 Cr.

Exposes students to team-building processes, adventure planning and risk assessment. Topics include conflict resolution, team formation, group dynamics, leadership, risk management and decision making. Prerequisite: Admission to the BAS Health Promotion and Management program at Bellevue College.

HPM 335 US Healthcare System • 5 Cr.

This course provides an introduction to essential topics surrounding healthcare delivery and public health within the U.S. healthcare system. This course will focus on the evolution of the U.S. healthcare system, the system's historical foundations, healthcare system resources and processes, and the future of the delivery of healthcare services. Prerequisite: Admission to the BAS HPM program.

HPM 340 Lifestyle Wellness Coaching • 5 Cr.

Defines the art and science of lifestyle coaching. Examines diverse methodologies, coaching principles, counseling skills and techniques used to guide individuals and groups successfully through meaningful lifestyle changes. Prerequisite: Admission to the BAS Health Promotion and Management program at Bellevue College.

HPM 360 Epidemiology and Health Care Statistics • 5 Cr.

Presents the fundamentals of epidemiology including infectious disease, environmental epidemiology, chronic disease, experimental study design, observation and data interpretation. Students engage in a comprehensive study of epidemiology through the human life span. Prerequisite: Admission to the BAS Health Promotion and Management program at Bellevue College.

HPM 375 Applied Research Methods • 5 Cr.

Introduces students to the research process, from developing a research question, through study design, and the collection and analysis of data. Qualitative and quantitative research models will be explored to assist students in effectively drawing conclusions. Prerequisite: Admission to the BAS Health Promotion and Management program at Bellevue College.

HPM 405 Health Behavior-Understanding & Effecting Change • 3 Cr.

Explores the various models and theories of health behavior. Factors that influence health behavior at individual, family, community and national/societal levels are investigated. Prerequisite: Admission to the BAS Health Promotion and Management program at Bellevue College.

HPM 415 Community Health • 2 Cr.

An overview of community health programs and the organizational structures of governmental and non-governmental health agencies. Examines various health services to address cultural, economic and environmental issues related to health care delivery and health disparity. Prerequisite: Admission to the BAS Health Promotion and Management program at Bellevue College.

HPM 430 Lifestyle Chronic Disease and Environment • 6 Cr.

Explores the relationship between chronic diseases/conditions, lifestyle behaviors, and the environment. Includes an examination of a wide variety of chronic conditions and focuses on prevention and management strategies. Prerequisite: Admission to the BAS Health Promotion and Management program at Bellevue College.

HPM 440 Safety and Workplace Ergonomics for Wellness • 4 Cr.

Provides training and certification for CPR, First Aid and HIV/AIDS as it applies to worksite wellness and safety. Explores HIPAA regulations, workplace violence and occupational ergonomics. Prerequisite: Admission to the BAS Health Promotion and Management program at Bellevue College.

HPM 445 Public Health Program Development and Evaluation • 5 Cr.

This course introduces students to the theory and application of public health and health promotion program planning, implementation, and evaluation. Students will be presented with these concepts, processes and techniques while engaging in exercises that emphasize the synthesis of health promotion competencies from a program development and evaluation perspective. Prerequisite: Admission to the BAS HPM program.

HPM 450 Worksite Wellness Management • 4 Cr.

A study of core elements in a successful worksite wellness program. The course reviews several program planning models and approaches to maintain organizational alignment. Key tenets examined are proper assessment, design, implementation, measurement, daily operations management, program evaluation and program reporting for worksite wellness programs. Prerequisite: Admission to the BAS Health Promotion and Management program at Bellevue College.

HPM 460 Community Health Service-Learning • 1 Cr.

Explores the integral role community health volunteers play in the community through a combination of classroom instruction and service-learning engagement. Includes 33-hours of community health volunteer service during the term employing skills and knowledge attained through the program. Prerequisite: Admission to the BAS Health Promotion and Management program at Bellevue College.

Description starting Summer 2018

Explores the integral role community health volunteers play in the community through a combination of classroom instruction and service-learning engagement. Includes 33-hours of community health volunteer service during the term employing skills and knowledge attained through the program. Prerequisite: Admission to the BAS Health Promotion and Management program at Bellevue College. Grading: Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory.

HPM 465 Practicum in Wellness Promotion • 5 Cr.

Provides experience in a community health setting such as a hospital wellness center, community wellness center, employee wellness center, wellness service provider company, or health department. Prerequisite: Admission to the BAS Health Promotion and Management program at Bellevue College.

Description starting Summer 2018

Provides experience in a community health setting such as a hospital wellness center, community wellness center, employee wellness center, wellness service provider company, or health department. Prerequisite: Admission to the BAS Health Promotion and Management program at Bellevue College. Grading: Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory.

HPM 470 Technological Applications in Health Promotions • 4 Cr.

An overview of various emerging forms of technology used in health promotion programs. Interactive tools and media to support individuals in proactive health are explored. The course provides students with knowledge and resources to examine current and trending technology that includes (but not limited to) online challenges and assessments, mobile applications, digital health coaching programs, web portals, social networking, portable trackers and access to electronic medical records. Prerequisite: Admission to the BAS Health Promotion and Management program at Bellevue College.

HPM 475 Capstone • 5 Cr.

The capstone project course is the culmination of the Health Promotion and Management Program. Students complete a comprehensive project drawn from case studies involving both management and wellness components. Prerequisite: Admission to the BAS Health Promotion and Management program at Bellevue College.

HSC 055 Math 5 • V1-10 Cr.

Emphasizes development of strategies to effectively solve mathematical problems for high school completion, and college and career readiness. Students meet class objectives through the use of algebra and geometry to solve problems. Students build their math vocabulary as well as note taking and technology skills. Prerequisite: ABE Orientation and advising.

HSC 065 English 5 • V1-10 Cr.

Emphasizes development of strategies to effectively communicate in English for high school completion and college and career readiness. Students read and report on college-level fiction and non-fiction texts that relate to social studies, science and literature. Students meet composition objectives by writing critical responses, including note taking and annotation. Students develop their technology skills to complete a variety of tasks. Prerequisite: ABE Orientation and advising.

HSC 071 GED Test Preparation I • V1-10 Cr.

Emphasizes the skills and strategies necessary for students placing at beginning high school reading and math levels to successfully complete the four GED tests: Social Studies, Science, Reasoning through Language Arts, and Mathematical Reasoning. Students are expected to register for and take the official tests when ready. Prerequisite: ABE Orientation and advising.

HSC 072 GED Test Preparation II • V1-10 Cr.

Emphasizes the skills and strategies necessary for students placing at advanced high school levels of reading and math to successfully complete the four GED tests: Social Studies, Science, Reasoning through Language Arts, and Mathematical Reasoning. Students are expected to register for and take the official tests when ready. Prerequisite: ABE Orientation and advising.

HSC 080 Developing a Portfolio • V1-8 Cr.

Students create a portfolio to demonstrate competencies in one or more subject matter area for high school completion based on state guidelines. Allows adults to work at their own pace. Designed to prepare them for a successful transition to college-level courses and to develop the behaviors and values relevant to success in higher education and the workforce. Orientation and advising are required before taking this course.

HSC 094 Special Topics in HC21+ • V1-10 Cr.

Allows specialized study of a subject supplementing the High School 21+ curriculum. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.

HSC 095 Special Topics in HC21+ • V1-10 Cr.

Allows specialized study of a subject supplementing the High School 21+ curriculum. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.

HSC 096 Special Topics in HC21+ • V1-10 Cr.

Allows specialized study of a subject supplementing the High School 21+ curriculum. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.

HSC 097 Special Topics in HC21+ • V1-10 Cr.

Allows specialized study of a subject supplementing the High School 21+ curriculum. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.

HSSA& 101 Introduction to Addictive Drugs • 3 Cr.

Surveys drinking and drug use, alcoholism, and drug addiction. Students discuss relevant theories and research, treatment rationale and modalities, and the social, psychological, physical, and legal aspects of chemical dependency.

HUMAN 194 Special Topics in Humanities • V1-5 Cr.

No class description found.

HUMAN 195 Special Topics in Humanities • V1-5 Cr.

No class description found.

HUMAN 196 Special Topics in Humanities • V1-5 Cr.

No class description found.

HUMAN 197 Special Topics in Humanities • V1-5 Cr.

No class description found.

HUMAN 205 Life & Culture for Study Abroad • V1-5 Cr.

Designed to enhance students' knowledge, understanding, and appreciation of people, culture, and life in other parts of the world, as part of an on-site travel study or travel learning program. Examines the identified subject as a total cultural product that may include history, geography, language, literature, music, art, architecture, religion, politics, etc. Introduces unique cultural aspects within a broad world context and in contrast to American culture and prepares students for a living and learning experience in that culture. Students learning activities may include lecture-discussion-participation, analysis of readings and films, exams, and research projects.

HUMAN 220 British Life & Culture • 5 Cr.

Provides a broad background to promote understanding of British culture and civilization. Takes a historical, social, and cultural approach to analyzing contemporary British society and examines traditions and institutions to give insights into contemporary British life. Students learning activities include lecture-discussion-participation, analysis of readings and films, field trips, site visits and walking tours, exams, and individual and group research and reports.

HUMAN 224 Australian Life & Culture • 5 Cr.

Course enhances students' knowledge, understanding, and appreciation of the culture and cultural groups of Australia. Examines Australia as a total cultural product, including history, geography, literature, music, art, architecture, religion and politics, and incorporates information about uniquely Australian sub-cultures and the development of a unique Australian civilization within the context of world events. Learning activities include lecture-discussion-participation, analysis of readings and films, exams, and a research project.

HUMAN 230 Central American Perspectives • V1-5 Cr.

Provides a broad background to promote understanding of culture and civilization in Central America. Examines traditions and institutions, takes a historical, social, and cultural approach to analyzing contemporary Central American issues, and gives insights into contemporary life. Students learning activities include lecture-discussion-participation, analysis of readings and films, field trips, site visits and walking tours, exams, and individual and group research and reports.

HUMAN 294 Special Topics in Humanities • V1-5 Cr.

No class description found.

HUMAN 295 Special Topics in Humanities • V1-5 Cr.

No class description found.

HUMAN 296 Special Topics in Humanities • V1-5 Cr.

No class description found.

HUMAN 297 Special Topics in Humanities • V1-5 Cr.

No class description found.

IBP 067 Oral Business Communications • 4.5 Cr.

Designed to improve the spoken job performance of non-native English speaking employees. Focus is on developing formal presentation skills, effective telephony techniques and interpersonal communication strategies appropriate to the business environment. Prerequisite: Acceptance into program or permission of instructor.

IBP 068 Written Business Communications • 4.5 Cr.

Improves the written effectiveness of non-native English speaking interns. Focus is on grammar, word choice, tone, and writing for a specific purpose and audience. Prerequisite: Acceptance into the IBP program or permission of director.

IBP 069 Introduction to Business • 4.5 Cr.

Improves understanding of business trends including sustainability, technology, and corporate social responsibility. Develops students? knowledge of economics, human resources, operations management, marketing, and finance. Prerequisite: Acceptance into the IBP program or permission of director.

IBP 076 International Business • 4.5 Cr.

Students gain an understanding of the international marketplace. Focus is on economics, culture, legal and political issues in a global context. Prerequisite: Acceptance into the IBP program or permission of director.

IBP 077 Observation Preparation • 4.5 Cr.

Prepares students with the skills, strategies, and resources to secure internships in their fields of interest. Prerequisite: Acceptance into the IBP program or director's permission.

IBP 086 Observation Placement • 2 Cr.

Students apply skills learned in Observation Preparation to secure an observational internship with guidance from instructor. Prerequisite: Acceptance into the IBP program or director's permission.

IBP 087 Pronunciation Workshop • 1.5 Cr.

Students learn how to communicate more effectively and naturally in English. Prerequisite: Acceptance into the IBP program and placement by director.

IBP 096 Workplace Support • 2 Cr.

Students learn how to increase responsibility, contribute to an organization, navigate workplace issues, and build a professional network. Prerequisite: Acceptance into the IBP program or director's permission.

IBP 097 Observation • 4.5 Cr.

Students apply workplace support knowledge to participate in an unpaid practical experience in a U.S. organization. Prerequisite: Acceptance into the IBP program.

IM 001 USED FOR PREREQ CHECKING • 0 Cr.

No class description found.

IMAGE 102 Imaging Aide Fundamentals • 2 Cr.

Presents skills and scope of practice of the Imaging Aide. Designed as an overview of hospital and clinic organization in relation to the radiology industry. Emphasis is directed toward patient flow within the system, information systems utilized, and specific patient and exam information included in diagnostic imaging. Prerequisite: Placement by assessment into ENGL& 101 or ENGL 092 or 093 with a C- or better.

IMAGE 110 Survey of Imaging • 3 Cr.

Presents a basic survey of the different medical specialties found in a diagnostic imaging department. Emphasis is on developing a working knowledge of the terminology, procedures, patient care, and occupational issues an imaging aide would encounter. Prerequisite: Placement by assessment into ENGL& 101 or ENGL 092 or 093 with a C- or better.

IMAGE 115 Radiologic Anatomy • 2 Cr.

Presents a basic survey of human anatomy commonly imaged in a diagnostic radiology department. Emphasis is on major structures and topographical anatomy. Prerequisite: Placement by assessment into ENGL& 101 or ENGL 092 or 093 with a C- or better.

INDES 140 Introduction to Interior Design • 5 Cr.

Relates design fundamentals to the study and practice of interior design. Topics include introduction to the elements and principles of design and their application to shaping interior space, design processes and methods, sustainability, the role of interior designers in practice and society, and what students can expect as an Interior Design major. Open to all interested students. Class format includes illustrated lectures, discussions, field learning, and projects.

INDES 167 Digital Design Tools • 2 Cr.

Uses a variety of digital design tools to demonstrate how graphic software applications and digital tools are used to enhance communication of design solutions and concepts. Includes graphic software applications, equipment and services for digital archiving, production, and printing. Structured as a workshop for students to work as much as possible at an independent pace. Prerequisite: INDES 171 with a C- or better.

INDES 169 SketchUp • 3 Cr.

Designed for students with basic SketchUp skills, or beginning level Computer Aided Design experience. Introduces strategies and skills for managing complex architectural models, as well as presentation methods, including Trimble Layout® and third-party rendering plug-ins.

INDES 171 Interior Design Studio I • 5 Cr.

Introduces the fundamental elements and principles of design. Students work with concepts and methods for defining and organizing space and form in the interior environment. Introduces graphic tools, techniques, and conventions used for effective visual communication in design. Applies basic theory in architectural drafting and drawing skills. Prerequisite: INDES 140 with a C- or better.

INDES 172 Interior Design Studio II • 5 Cr.

Introduces graphic tools, techniques, and conventions used for effective visual communication in design. Students apply theory as they develop skills in architectural drafting, lettering, and basic perspective drawing. Prerequisite: INDES 171 with a C- or better.

INDES 179 Perspective Drawing • 5 Cr.

Introduction of tools and techniques for illustrative graphic presentation of design ideas and products. Students learn advanced perspective drawing methods and practice simple and rapid illustration techniques in various media including graphite, ink, marker pens and collage.

INDES 194 Special Topics in Interior Design • V1-5 Cr.

Allows specialized or in-depth study of a subject supplementing the interior design curriculum. Student interest and instructor expertise help determine the topic, to be announced in the class schedule. May be repeated for a maximum of 10 credits. Course graded pass/fail. Prerequisite: Permission of program chair or instructor.

INDES 195 Special Topics in Interior Design • V1-5 Cr.

Allows specialized or in-depth study of a subject supplementing the interior design curriculum. Student interest and instructor expertise help determine the topic, to be announced in the class schedule. May be repeated for a maximum of 10 credits. Course graded pass/fail. Prerequisite: Permission of program chair or instructor.

INDES 196 Special Topics in Interior Design • V1-5 Cr.

Allows specialized or in-depth study of a subject supplementing the interior design curriculum. Student interest and instructor expertise help determine the topic, to be announced in the class schedule. May be repeated for a maximum of 10 credits. Course graded pass/fail. Prerequisite: Permission of program chair or instructor.

INDES 197 Special Topics in Interior Design • V1-5 Cr.

Allows specialized or in-depth study of a subject supplementing the interior design curriculum. Student interest and instructor expertise help determine the topic, to be announced in the class schedule. May be repeated for a maximum of 10 credits. Course graded pass/fail. Prerequisite: Permission of program chair or instructor.

INDES 242 Interior Materials & Sources • 5 Cr.

Introduces textiles and various interior materials and sources selected, specified, installed and maintained in an interior environment. Topics include, materials for flooring, walls, ceilings, upholstery, millwork, and cabinetry. Includes equipment, appliances, how to measure, specify, and understand correct installation methods, and product maintenance. Prerequisite: INDES 171 with a C- or better.

INDES 261 Design Detailing • 2 Cr.

Introduces principles of detailing and its impact on the design and construction processes. Topics include documentation for construction, aesthetics, and spatial experiences. Course graded pass/fail. Prerequisite: INDES 280 with a C- or better.

INDES 262 Introduction to Computer-Aided Design • 5 Cr.

Description: Introduces computer-aided design for designers. Covers the role and application of computers in graphic communication and interior design while creating two-dimensional drawings. Hands-on work in the computer lab familiarizes students with the hardware and software. Prerequisite: INDES 171 with a C- or better.

INDES 265 Design Illustration • 5 Cr.

Introduces tools and techniques for illustrative graphic presentation of design ideas and products. Covers advanced perspective drawing methods. Students practice simple and rapid illustration techniques in various media including graphite, ink, colored pencils, marker pens, pastels, watercolor, and collage. Topics include concept and descriptive writing and production, duplication, transfer, and mounting techniques for presentation. Prerequisite: INDES 171 with a C- or better.

INDES 267 Digital Design Presentation • 3 Cr.

Builds on skills covered in INDES 167. Students employ digital design tools in the organization and presentation of their design solutions. Introduces various strategies for effectively linking media and message, using fundamental graphic and identity design principles, and evaluation methods for producing design presentation packages and printed documents. Prerequisite: INDES 167 with a C- or better.

INDES 269 Introduction to Rhinoceros 3D • 5 Cr.

Introduces fundamental concepts and methods for planning, organizing, and arranging digital models using Rhinoceros 3D modeling software. Various exercises throughout the quarter will be used to illustrate various strategies for generating three dimensional form using Rhinoceros.

INDES 273 Interior Design Studio III • 5 Cr.

Introduces fundamental concepts and methods for planning, organizing, and arranging spaces in the interior environment. Students examine space in terms of human needs, activities, and priorities and apply design processes to make the best functional and aesthetic use of space. Prerequisite: INDES 172 with a C- or better.

INDES 280 Contract Documents • 5 Cr.

Introduces professional applications for graphic communication and CADD skills, specifically the technical drawings used in construction. Students develop a set of construction drawings and specifications for a project of their own design. Prerequisite: INDES 262 and INDES 273 both with a C- or better.

INDES 294 Special Topics in Interior Design • V1-5 Cr.

Allows specialized or in-depth study of a subject supplementing the interior design curriculum. Student interest and instructor expertise help determine the topic, to be announced in the class schedule. May be repeated for a maximum of 10 credits. Prerequisite: Permission of program chair or instructor.

INDES 295 Special Topics in Interior Design • V1-5 Cr.

Allows specialized or in-depth study of a subject supplementing the interior design curriculum. Student interest and instructor expertise help determine the topic, to be announced in the class schedule. May be repeated for a maximum of 10 credits. Prerequ isite: Permission of program chair or instructor.

INDES 296 Special Topics in Interior Design • V1-5 Cr.

Allows specialized or in-depth study of a subject supplementing the interior design curriculum. Student interest and instructor expertise help determine the topic, to be announced in the class schedule. May be repeated for a maximum of 10 credits. Prerequ isite: Permission of program chair or instructor.

INDES 297 Special Topics in Interior Design • V1-5 Cr.

Allows specialized or in-depth study of a subject supplementing the interior design curriculum. Student interest and instructor expertise help determine the topic, to be announced in the class schedule. May be repeated for a maximum of 10 credits. Prerequ isite: Permission of program chair or instructor.

INDES 299 Individual Studies in Interior Design • V1-5 Cr.

Allows in-depth study or approved work experience in the field of interior design. May be repeated for a maximum of 10 credits. Prerequisite: Interior Design major and permission of instructor.

INDES 340 Interior Design Theory • 3 Cr.

Explores philosophical approaches to design and various aesthetic and judgmental concerns. Applies critical thinking and creative problem solving to the enclosure and systematic organization of space. Prerequisite: Acceptance to the program or permission of instructor.

INDES 350 History of Interiors & Furniture • 5 Cr.

Surveys the main characteristics and motifs of Western interiors and furniture from antiquity to the 19th century. Students examine how people, social conditions, and technology influenced furniture design in each period. Either INDES 150 or INDES 350 may be taken for credit, not both. Class format includes illustrated lectures and discussions.

INDES 351 Modern Interiors & Furniture • 5 Cr.

Continues INDES 350. Covers interiors and furniture designers and movements from the Victorian period to the present. Students analyze the furniture of each period in terms of human values, social conditions, technology and design criteria. Either INDES 151 or 351 may be taken for credit, not both.

INDES 352 Design & Fabrication • 3 Cr.

Gives practical experience in designing and building furniture. Students combine knowledge of design theory and processes, materials, and drawings with hands-on experience in the shop. Topics include engineering basics, manufacturing processes, joinery, and finishes. Either INDES 152 or INDES 352 may be taken for credit, not both. Prerequisite: ART 108.

INDES 355 Contemporary Design Issues • 5 Cr.

The course aims at creating a critical understanding of contemporary design in the context of global urbanization. The class strives to dig beyond the mainstream architectural historiography and puts forward a critical perspective by introducing non-Western examples, themes including colonialism, feminism and environmental, humanitarian and socially conscious design. Prerequisite: Acceptance to the program or permission of instructor.

INDES 365 Project Reboot • 5 Cr.

Uses a variety of digital tools to demonstrate how graphic software can be leveraged to enhance communication of design solutions. This course is focused on the nature of design presentations. This class will make your work look and read better than ever. Recommended: A working knowledge of Adobe Creative Suite, SketchUp, AutoCAD, Rhino and Revit.

INDES 370 Design Studio Residential • 5 Cr.

Focuses on residential spaces, the problem solving discipline of design process and its application to single and multi-family dwellings. Develops concepts to achieve design goals and apply theoretical knowledge and technical skills to design solutions. Students work on a variety of professionally relevant interior design projects. Either INDES 270 or INDES 370 may be taken for credit, not both. Prerequisite: Acceptance to the program. Students may repeat course up to 15 Credits. Students may enroll in only one studio course (INDES 370, 371, 372) in any one quarter.

INDES 371 Design Studio Commercial • 5 Cr.

Focuses on commercial spaces, the problem solving discipline of the design process and its application to commercial spaces. Develops concepts to achieve design goals and apply theoretical knowledge and technical skills to design solutions. Prerequisite: Acceptance into the BAA program. Students may repeat course up to 15 Credits. Students may enroll in only one studio course (INDES 370, 371, 372) in any one quarter.

INDES 372 Design Studio Experimental • 5 Cr.

The experimental studio focuses on problem solving as it pertains to conceptual and theoretical design issues. This studio will address and investigate topics relating to interior design in unique methods such as technology, methodology, construction or production to give a few examples. The studio will result in an investigation into interior design. May be repeated for a maximum of 15 Credits. Prerequisite: Acceptance to the program. Students may enroll in only one studio course (INDES 370, 371, 372) in any one quarter.

INDES 390 Interior Building Systems • 5 Cr.

Introduces the physical components of building construction. Topics include industry wide classification systems, standards and resources, basic physical properties of building materials, typical building construction systems, mechanical and electrical systems, and building codes related to interiors. Either INDES 190 or INDES 390 may be taken for credit, not both. Prerequisite: Acceptance to the program or permission of instructor.

INDES 391 Lighting for Interiors • 5 Cr.

Introduces lighting design for interior environments. Students explore human visual perception, the properties of electric light and daylight, including light source technology and terminology, an overview of energy issues as they relate to lighting, and visual communication of architectural lighting design. The course applies architectural lighting design processes and principles to specific interior design problems. Either INDES191 or INDES391 may be taken for credit, not both. Prerequisite: Acceptance to the program or permission of the instructor.

INDES 394 Special Topics in Interior Design • V1-5 Cr.

Allows specialized or in-depth study of a subject supplementing the interior design curriculum. Student interest and instructor expertise help determine the topic, to be announced in the class schedule. May be repeated for a maximum of 10 credits. Course graded pass/fail. Prerequisite: Permission of program chair or instructor.

INDES 395 Special Topics in Interior Design • V1-5 Cr.

Allows specialized or in-depth study of a subject supplementing the interior design curriculum. Student interest and instructor expertise help determine the topic, to be announced in the class schedule. May be repeated for a maximum of 10 credits. Course graded pass/fail. Prerequisite: Permission of program chair or instructor.

INDES 396 Special Topics in Interior Design • V1-5 Cr.

Allows specialized or in-depth study of a subject supplementing the interior design curriculum. Student interest and instructor expertise help determine the topic, to be announced in the class schedule. May be repeated for a maximum of 10 credits. Course graded pass/fail. Prerequisite: Permission of program chair or instructor.

INDES 397 Special Topics in Interior Design • V1-5 Cr.

Allows specialized or in-depth study of a subject supplementing the interior design curriculum. Student interest and instructor expertise help determine the topic, to be announced in the class schedule. May be repeated for a maximum of 10 credits. Course graded pass/fail. Prerequisite: Permission of program chair or instructor.

INDES 399 Individual Studies in Interior Design • V1-5 Cr.

Allows in-depth study or approved work experience in the field of interior design. Prerequisite: Interior Design major and permission of instructor.

INDES 440 Design Research • 2 Cr.

Focuses on methods for research, problem identification, site identification and analysis, and definition of user needs in preparation for pursuing an individualized inquiry of interior design issues in specific built environment contexts. Work from this course is carried forward to INDES 471 and INDES 472. Prerequisite: Acceptance into the program and two (2) courses from the INDES 370, 371, 372 design studio series with a C (2.0) or better.

Description starting Summer 2018

Focuses on methods for research, problem identification, site identification and analysis, and definition of user needs in preparation for pursuing an individualized inquiry of interior design issues in specific built environment contexts. Work from this course is carried forward to INDES 471 and INDES 472. Prerequisite: Acceptance into the program; INDES 340 and two (2) courses from the INDES 370, 371, 372 design studio series with a C (2.0) or better.

INDES 471 Capstone Design Studio I • 5 Cr.

Focuses on the problem solving discipline of the design process and its application to interior design. Sequence begins by focusing on concept development to achieve design goals, and application of theoretical knowledge and technical skills to research, develop, and document design process, product, and proposals. Students work on a variety of professionally relevant self-directed interior design projects, pursue an individualized area of inquiry and project context, and prepare a detailed analysis, program, concept and schematic design presentation. Builds on research begun in INDES 440. Prerequisite: Acceptance to the program, 15 credits in Studio Design courses (INDES 370, 371 or 372), and INDES 440, all with a C or better.

INDES 472 Capstone Design Studio II • 5 Cr.

Focuses on the problem solving discipline of the design process and its application to interior design. Completes the capstone studio sequence with a design development phase. Students work on a variety of professionally relevant self-directed interior design projects, pursue an individualized area of inquiry and project context, and prepare a detailed design solution and project documentation. Builds on research begun in INDES 440 and uses research and concepts developed in INDES 471 for design development process in INDES 472. Prerequisite: Acceptance to the program and INDES 471 with a C or better.

INDES 480 Professional Practices & Principles • 5 Cr.

Prepares students to work as professional interior designers. Includes managing interior design projects, legal and contractual issues, resources and services, and working with showroom and service personnel, and clients. Either INDES 180 or INDES 480 may be taken for credit, not both. Prerequisite: Acceptance to the program or permission of instructor.

INDES 485 Practicum in Interior Design • 3 Cr.

Offers students additional work-study experience relevant to future employment plans in interior design. Students must complete all requirements during the quarter in which they enroll, or no later than the end of the following quarter, excluding summer. Either INDES 285 or INDES 485 may be taken for credit, not both. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.

INFO 101 The World of Information • 2 Cr.

What do you mean I can?t find that on the Internet? This course explores the many manifestations of information, from print to digital. Explore how information is created, used, and valued. Discover how to ask the right questions and how to find the best resources for your purpose.

INSTR 000 EWU BLOCK CLASSES • 0 Cr.

No class description found.

INTER 100 Interdisciplinary Studies • 15 Cr.

No class description found.

INTER 110 CSI Bellevue: Who Do It • 17 Cr.

Do you need biology and chemistry for an allied health field or a transfer degree? Mice and Matter is an integrated learning community. Through hands-on activities you will learn how to use biology and chemistry to solve crimes! Accelerate your entry into A&P while learning science through the lens of forensics and anthropology! Then you will be able to answer the questions? Who Dunnit?? Prerequisite: Math 098 with a C or better, or placement into Math 099 or higher. Strongly recommended: BASCI 098, CHEM 100 or Chem& 121, or one year of high school chemistry. Fulfills laboratory science course requirement at BC.

INTER 115 Bite Me Consumption and Sustainability in the US • 11 Cr.

Drive-thru or dining room table? Factory-processed or home-grown? Broccoli, barley, beans or edible food-like substances? What?s cheap about cheap food? Is all food equal? What is real? Do you eat for nutrients, taste or cost? The focus of this course is the impacts of lifestyle choices in regard to food. We will examine our behaviors, choices, and responsibilities and consequences of our actions to our communities, nation and the entire globe by investigating ecosystem interconnections. Through our readings and discussions, we will evaluate diverse opinions and values in order to scrutinize our own personal beliefs. Minimum prerequisite: placement by assessment into ENGL& 101, or ENGL 092 or 093 with a C- or better. English course placement depends on level of prerequisites met.

INTER 116 Bite Me Consumption and Sustainability in the US • 10 Cr.

No class description found.

INTER 117 Bite Me 2.0 Food Security and Sustainability • 11 Cr.

No class description found.

INTER 118 Bite Me 2.0 Food Security and Sustainability • 10 Cr.

No class description found.

INTER 125 The Pursuit of Happiness • 10 Cr.

What is happiness? What are the elements of a fulfilling and meaningful life? This class explores what social scientists have discovered about happiness at both the individual and societal levels. Topics include friendship, love, justice, citizenship, time, sustainability, self-compassion, empathy, creativity, politics, money, media, achievement, gratitude, mindfulness, and humor.

INTER 130 How to Survive the Collapse of W Civilization • 10 Cr.

No class description found.

INTER 135 Finding Your Place in School and Life • 10 Cr.

How do I create the good life for myself? For that matter, how do I make it through college? Begin to answer these questions while developing your sociology and English skills through reading, writing, discussing, and interacting with guest speakers in ?The Good Life?. Prerequisite: placement by assessment into ENGL 092, 093 or ENGL& 101; or completion of ENGL 092 or 093 with a C- or better. English course placement depends on level of prerequisites met.

INTER 140 Idiocracy • 15 Cr.

No class description found.

INTER 145 Mind Your Language • 10 Cr.

No class description found.

INTER 150 Fighting for the Planet • 10 Cr.

No class description found.

INTER 155 The Wire: Life on the Streets and War on Drugs • 15 Cr.

No class description found.

INTER 160 Love in the Digital Age • 10 Cr.

No class description found.

INTER 165 Coming to America: Hist and Lit Immigration • 10 Cr.

No class description found.

INTER 170 Are You Who You Think You Are: Finding of Self • 11 Cr.

No class description found.

INTER 175 What is Black: Blackness in the Modern Diaspora • 10 Cr.

No class description found.

INTER 180 The Art and Science of Dreaming • 10 Cr.  New

No class description found.

INTST 105 Geography of World Affairs • 5 Cr.

Offers a geographical perspective on contemporary world problems. Students investigate economic, demographic, social, political, cultural, and environmental issues, with emphasis on interrelationships, patterns, processes, and potential solutions. Same as GEOG 105. Either INTST 105 or GEOG 105 may be taken for credit, but not both.

INTST 123 Introduction to Globalization • 5 Cr.

Globalization considers the dynamic processes and consequences of human contact over time that cross traditional economic, cultural and geographic boundaries. The course examines the ever increasing flows of goods, people, ideas, capital and services and the subsequent challenges that have emerged for humankind. Same as GEOG 123. Either GEOG 123 or INTST 123 may be taken for credit, but not both.

INTST 150 International Business • 5 Cr.

Surveys international business and trade. Students focus on the inter-relationships among technology, culture, law, and economics in the contemporary world.

INTST 194 Special Topics in International Studies • V1-10 Cr.

Covers supplementary or unusual classes related to the field. Topics are announced in the class schedule.

INTST 195 Special Topics in International Studies • V1-10 Cr.

Covers supplementary or unusual classes related to the field. Topics are announced in the class schedule.

INTST 196 Special Topics in International Studies • V1-10 Cr.

Covers supplementary or unusual classes related to the field. Topics are announced in the class schedule.

INTST 197 Special Topics in International Studies • V1-10 Cr.

Covers supplementary or unusual classes related to the field. Topics are announced in the class schedule.

INTST 198 Seminar in International Studies • V1-10 Cr.

Includes seminars, workshops, etc., for which college credit is offered.

INTST 199 Individual Studies in International Studies • V1-10 Cr.

Covers directed readings, special projects, and independent study by an individual student. Course may be repeated for a maximum of 15 credits. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.

INTST 200 States & Capitalism: Origin/Modern Global System • 5 Cr.

Explores the origins, development, and impact of the modern state from the 10th to mid-20th century. Students analyze the political consequences of change under capitalist, socialist, or mixed economies.

INTST 201 Introduction to International Political Economy • 5 Cr.

Examines international economics in the post-World War II era. Students investigate the post-war economic and political orders, including the crisis of the 1970's-1980's and north/south and east/west relations.

INTST 202 Cultural Interactions in An Interdependent World • 5 Cr.

Critically analyzes the relationship between culture and politics in the contemporary world, focusing on how the systems of meaning and social organization we call ?culture? impact political processes at the local, national, and international levels. Special emphasis on the interaction between ?Western? and ?non-Western? cultures.

INTST 204 Global History • 5 Cr.

Surveys comparative global history, focusing on the relationships between cultures. Students investigate global developments in religion, law, and technology as well as the rise and fall of empires and cultures. Same as HIST 120. Either INTST 204 or HIST 120 may be taken for credit, not both. May be used as a social science or humanities credit, not both, at BC.

INTST 227 Middle East Politics & Society • 5 Cr.

Entails an understanding of Islam as a fundamental socio-economic and political force, the European power of politics of early centuries, U.S. involvement in the region, comparative analysis of governments, political cultures, economic development, regional conflict and terrorism. Same as POLS 227. Either INTST 227 or POLS 227 may be taken for credit, not both.

INTST 230 Latin American Political Economy & Society • 5 Cr.

A comparative exploration of the questions and challenges of Latin American economic and societal transformation, of the dynamic interaction between global and domestic factors, and of the regional responses and outcomes this process engenders. Prerequisite: ECON& 201 or INTST 201 or POLS 103 or SOC& 201 recommended.

INTST 261 The Middle East in the Islamic Era • 5 Cr.

Examines the political, social, and cultural history of the Middle East since the 7th century. Topics include the development of Islam, the rise and decline of Islamic empires, and the impact of modernization, the Arab-Israeli confrontation, and Islamic fundamentalism. Same as HIST 261. Either INTST 261 or HIST 261 may be taken for credit, not both. May be used as a social science or humanities credit, not both, at BC. Recommended: HIST 102 or HIST 103.

INTST 280 History of Africa • 5 Cr.

Examines the history of the continent from the origins of the human species to the present. Topics include the rise and fall of ancient kingdoms and civilizations, the impact of the wider world from Greek and Roman times to the 20th century, and Africa's role in international affairs. Same as HIST 280. Either INTST 280 or HIST 280 may be taken for credit, not both. May be used as a social science or humanities credit, not both, at BC.

INTST 294 Special Topics in International Studies • V1-10 Cr.

Covers supplementary or unusual classes related to the field. Topics are announced in the class schedule.

INTST 295 Special Topics in International Studies • V1-10 Cr.

Covers supplementary or unusual classes related to the field. Topics are announced in the class schedule.

INTST 296 Special Topics in International Studies • V1-10 Cr.

Covers supplementary or unusual classes related to the field. Topics are announced in the class schedule.

INTST 297 Special Topics in International Studies • V1-10 Cr.

Covers supplementary or unusual classes related to the field. Topics are announced in the class schedule.

INTST 298 Seminar in International Studies • V1-10 Cr.

Includes seminars, workshops, etc., for which college credit is offered.

INTST 299 Individual Studies in International Studies • V1-10 Cr.

Covers directed readings, special projects, and independent study by an individual student. May be repeated for a maximum of 15 credits. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.

ISIT 105 Problem Solving for the IT Professional • 5 Cr.

This course presents a wide variety of strategies to build a person's problem solving skills towards situations in IT. Students practice creative/lateral thinking techniques and communication skills to approach technical and non-technical problems. Prerequisite: Admission into BAS Information Systems and Technology program, or permission of instructor.

ISIT 300 Problem Solving Strategies • 5 Cr.  New

Description starting Summer 2018

This course classifies and examines a variety of problem solving methodologies to improve a person's problem solving and decision making skills. Students engage in personal and group dynamics, vertical/convergent methods, creative/lateral thinking techniques and communication skills to apply and solve technical and non-technical problems. Prerequisites: Admission into BAS Information Systems and Technology program, or permission of instructor.

ISIT 305 Network Security and Firewalls • 5 Cr.

This course covers the skills required to develop a security infrastructure, recognize threats and vulnerabilities to networks, and mitigate those threats. Emphasizes core security technologies, installation, troubleshooting and monitoring of network devices to maintain integrity, confidentiality and availability of data and devices. Includes attack and defense case study. Either ISIT 305 or NSCOM 205 may be taken for credit, not both. Prerequisite: Admission into the Cyber Security and Systems Administration concentration of the BAS IST program, or permission of the instructor.

ISIT 320 Advanced Web Development • 5 Cr.

Students learn to develop efficient web applications across multiple browsers. Students will use applicable design principles and protocols, and best practices in creating extensible web applications. Students will use both open source and proprietary technologies to create web sites that incorporate code elements and services from across the Internet. Prerequisite: Admission to the Application Development concentration of the ISIT program, or permission of the instructor.

ISIT 322 Developing Mobile Applications • 5 Cr.

This course prepares students to do mobile application development. Students will learn to design, develop, test, and deploy mobile applications for multiple types of mobile devices in multiple software environments. Prerequisite: ISIT 320.

Description starting Summer 2018

This course prepares students to do mobile application development. Students will learn to design, develop, test, and deploy mobile applications for multiple types of mobile devices in multiple software environments. Prerequisite: ISIT 320 with a C or better.

ISIT 324 Software Testing • 5 Cr.

This class will present to students practical techniques and strategies to use in overall software testing and quality assurance methodologies. Students will be exposed to testing concepts and how to design, develop and document different kinds of tests. Prerequisite: Admission to the Application Development concentration of the ISIT program, or permission of the instructor.

ISIT 328 Information Security Essentials • 5 Cr.

Introduces concepts and issues related to securing information systems and the development of policies to implement information security controls. Topics include security vulnerabilities, threats and defense measures and legal and ethical issues associated with information security. Students will learn how to recognize and apply secure software development best practices. Prerequisite: Admission to the Application Development or Business Intelligence concentration of the BAS IST program, or permission of the instructor.

ISIT 330 Business Intelligence Applications • 5 Cr.

Students learn about Business Intelligence (BI) applications and appropriate application architectures for a variety of scenarios. The benefits of BI and the possibilities for organizational change are discussed. Students use current BI tools to develop realistic solutions. Current trends are discussed as is the growing role of "big data." Prerequisite: Admission to the BAS Data Analytics program and completion of BUSIT 103, or admission to the BAS Information Systems and Technology program and completion of ISIT 331. Students not admitted to either program should contact the program chair for more details.

Description starting Summer 2018

Students learn about Business Intelligence (BI) applications and appropriate application architectures for a variety of scenarios. The benefits of BI and the possibilities for organizational change are discussed. Students use current BI tools to develop realistic solutions. Current trends are discussed as is the growing role of "big data." Admission to the BAS Data Analytics program and completion of BUSIT 103 with a C or better, or admission to the BAS Information Systems and Technology program and completion of ISIT 331 with a C or better. Students not admitted to either program should contact the program chair for more details.

ISIT 331 Applied Database Concepts • 5 Cr.

This course provides an in-depth introduction to relational database concepts, the Structured Query Language (SQL), and relational database programming. Topics include generating the structure of a relational database and relational database design principles. This course provides extensive practical experience with creating, modifying, and querying relational databases. Prerequisite: Admission to the Business Intelligence concentration of the ISIT program, or permission of the instructor.

ISIT 332 Data Warehousing • 5 Cr.

Students learn concepts and techniques associated with development of a data warehouse. They learn how to prepare data for consolidation and exchange. Students learn to apply Extract, Transform and Load (ETL) principles and they use current ETL tools. Students practice coding techniques for extracting, cleaning and conforming data. Prerequisite: ISIT 330.

Description starting Summer 2018

Students learn concepts and techniques associated with development of a data warehouse. They learn how to prepare data for consolidation and exchange. Students learn to apply Extract, Transform and Load (ETL) principles and they use current ETL tools. Students practice coding techniques for extracting, cleaning and conforming data. Prerequisite: ISIT 330 with a C or better.

ISIT 333 Applied Programming Concepts • 5 Cr.

This course provides an in-depth introduction to core programming concepts and the software development process. This course will cover object-oriented programming concepts through extensive "hands-on" practice with an integrated software development tool and a modern object oriented programming language. Prerequisite: Admission to the Business Intelligence concentration of the ISIT program, or permission of the instructor.

ISIT 334 Data Visualization Tools & Techniques • 5 Cr.

This course introduces the theory and concepts related to effective display of data with a focus on quantitative data. Students learn the principles of preparing effective visualizations and the tools to create such visualizations. Students use analytic tools to create visualizations. Prerequisite: ISIT 330.

Description starting Summer 2018

This course introduces the theory and concepts related to effective display of data with a focus on quantitative data. Students learn the principles of preparing effective visualizations and the tools to create such visualizations. Students use analytic tools to create visualizations. Prerequisite: ISIT 330 with a C or better.

ISIT 336 Dimensional Modeling • 5 Cr.

Dimensional modeling has been broadly accepted as one of the principle techniques for data warehouse design. Students use a sequenced series of case studies and hands-on exercises to learn effective design principles for data warehouse development. Prerequisite: ISIT 330.

Description starting Summer 2018

Dimensional modeling has been broadly accepted as one of the principle techniques for data warehouse design. Students use a sequenced series of case studies and hands-on exercises to learn effective design principles for data warehouse development. Prerequisite: ISIT 330 with a C or better.

ISIT 337 Predictive Analytics • 5 Cr.

In this course students learn to go beyond simply querying data to do predictive data mining analysis. Students learn to apply data mining algorithms to realistic organizational data to find previously undiscovered patterns and draw conclusions. Students use current software tools and hands-on exercises to learn theoretical concepts. Prerequisite: ISIT 330.

Description starting Summer 2018

In this course students learn to go beyond simply querying data to do predictive data mining analysis. Students learn to apply data mining algorithms to realistic organizational data to find previously undiscovered patterns and draw conclusions. Students use current software tools and hands-on exercises to learn theoretical concepts. Prerequisite: ISIT 330 with a C or better.

ISIT 338 Data Analysis Techniques • 5 Cr.

Students learn a variety strategies and techniques for analyzing data and making decisions based upon that data. Students use case studies to integrate their analysis and problem solving skills. Students use current software systems to do analysis and they are required to present the results of their analyses. Prerequisite: ISIT 330, and either MATH 130 or BA 240.

Description starting Summer 2018

Students learn a variety strategies and techniques for analyzing data and making decisions based upon that data. Students use case studies to integrate their analysis and problem solving skills. Students use current software systems to do analysis and they are required to present the results of their analyses. Prerequisite: ISIT 330 with a C or better, and MATH 130.

ISIT 342 VoIP and Wireless • 5 Cr.

This course introduces and applies the concepts of design, implementation and troubleshooting of Voice over Internet Protocol (VoIP) and wireless systems. Technologies include VoIP Managers, Voicemail, System Reporting, Wireless Controllers, Access Points, Relay Systems, Wireless Topologies, Wireless Security and the associated protocols for both VoIP and wireless technologies. Prerequisite: Admission to the Cyber Security and Systems Administration concentration of the BAS IST program, or permission of the instructor.

ISIT 344 Virtualization & Storage • 5 Cr.

This course introduces and applies the concepts of design, implementation, management and troubleshooting of server virtualization, network virtualization and large storage systems. Technologies include VMware and Storage Area Networks (SAN) solutions. Prerequisite: Admission to the Cyber Security and Systems Administration concentration of the BAS IST program, or permission of the instructor.

ISIT 350 Digital Information Analysis and Recovery • 5 Cr.

Introduces students to computer forensics, both its fundamentals and best practices for incident response. Includes the legal aspects of computer forensics, as well as its relationship to the Information Technology field. Hands-on projects will give students the tools and techniques to perform a full computer forensic investigation. Prerequisite: Admission to the Cyber Security and Systems Administration concentration of the BAS IST program, or permission of the instructor.

ISIT 399 Independent Study • V1-5 Cr.

Covers directed advanced special projects, student research, and independent study in Information Systems & Technology by an individual student. May be repeated for a maximum of 15 credits. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.

ISIT 420 Advanced Data Access Techniques • 5 Cr.

Students learn to develop data driven applications using both proprietary and open source environments. Students will develop applications using data from a variety of data repositories including relational databases, multi-dimensional databases and "big data" repositories. Students also learn to work with data in a variety of formats. Prerequisite: Admission to the Application Development concentration of BAS IST program, or permission of the instructor.

ISIT 422 Application Architecture • 5 Cr.

Students learn best practices for developing enterprise software solutions with appropriate structure for maintainability and efficiency. This course expands student knowledge of software application structure and design principles focusing on advanced object oriented techniques, service oriented architectures and cloud services. Prerequisite: ISIT 420 Advanced Data Access with a C+ or better.

Description starting Summer 2018

Students learn best practices for developing enterprise software solutions with appropriate structure for maintainability and efficiency. This course expands student knowledge of software application structure and design principles focusing on advanced object oriented techniques, service oriented architectures and cloud services. Prerequisite: ISIT 420 with a C or better.

ISIT 432 Data Repositories for Analytics • 5 Cr.

Students learn to create and query analytic databases including multi-dimensional databases (cubes) and ?big data? repositories. Students create business-oriented solutions for analytics. Prerequisite: ISIT 330.

Description starting Summer 2018

Students learn to create and query analytic databases including multi-dimensional databases (cubes) and ?big data? repositories. Students create business-oriented solutions for analytics. Prerequisite: ISIT 330 with a C or better.

ISIT 434 Web Analytics • 5 Cr.

Students learn techniques for analyzing data generated by web traffic and social media sites. Students learn the importance of such data to an organization and they learn what analytic measures are available and applicable. Students also learn how to implement web data collection and analytic tools for web-sites. Prerequisite: ISIT 330.

Description starting Summer 2018

Students learn techniques for analyzing data generated by web traffic and social media sites. Students learn the importance of such data to an organization and they learn what analytic measures are available and applicable. Students also learn how to implement web data collection and analytic tools for web-sites. Prerequisite: Admission to the Business Intelligence concentration of the BAS ISIT program, or BAS Data Analytics, or permission of instructor.

ISIT 436 Performance Management • 5 Cr.

Students learn how to implement performance management in support of organizational change. Students learn how organizations define objectives, establish goals and measure progress using metrics and key performance indicators. Students learn how to implement software systems to provide appropriate information to users at all levels within an organization. Prerequisite: ISIT 330.

Description starting Summer 2018

Students learn how to implement performance management in support of organizational change. Students learn how organizations define objectives, establish goals and measure progress using metrics and key performance indicators. Students learn how to implement software systems to provide appropriate information to users at all levels within an organization. Prerequisite: ISIT 330 with a C or better.

ISIT 440 Administering a Linux Server • 5 Cr.

This course covers the essentials of Linux server administration. Students install, configure, use, secure and administer a Linux enterprise server. Topics include user access and security, process and service control, server monitoring, networks and networking services, interoperability, package management, backup and recovery and essential BASH commands. Prerequisite: Admission to the Cyber Security and Systems Administration concentration of the BAS IST program, or permission of the instructor.

ISIT 442 Managing Messaging Services • 5 Cr.

This course is an introduction to messaging and collaboration services for system administrators. Students will become familiar with popular messaging platforms and protocols such as POP3, IMAP, SMTP, and web services. Additional topics will include server virtualization, cloud services, system configuration, directory service configuration and deploying email clients. Prerequisite: Admission to the Cyber Security and Systems Administration concentration of the BAS IST program, or permission of the instructor.

ISIT 444 Automation/Configuration & Management • 5 Cr.

Introduces the concepts and application of basic scripting to monitor and collect logs in relation to servers and the associated services. Topics include scripting, logging, automation and system management. Prerequisite: Admission to the Cyber Security and Systems Administration concentration of the BAS IST program, or permission of the instructor.

ISIT 450 Network Vulnerabilities and Countermeasures • 5 Cr.

This course covers the concepts of network vulnerabilities from a hacker's perspective. Its focus is professional penetration testing and the securing of information assets. The course provides students with the knowledge to prevent, detect, and respond to network security incidents. Prerequisite: Admission to the Cyber Security and Systems Administration concentration of the BAS IST program, or permission of the instructor.

ISIT 452 Network Security Monitoring • 5 Cr.

This course focuses on the qualities that go into a sound Network Security Monitoring (NSM) system. Hands-on exercises use various network protocol analyzers and other tools to detect, investigate, and respond to network and system attacks. Students will learn how identify authorized and unauthorized malicious activity on an information systems network. Prerequisite: Admission to either the Systems Administration or Information Security concentration of the ISIT program, or permission of the instructor. Prerequisite: Admission to the Cyber Security and Systems Administration concentration of the BAS IST program, or permission of the instructor.

ISIT 454 System Hardening • 5 Cr.

Hardening a computer reduces the attack surface by disabling functionality that is not required while maintaining the minimum functionality that is required. Students will learn to apply the key system hardening principles of segregation of duties, dual control, principle of least privilege, and economy of mechanism. This course covers system hardening techniques for physical devices & connections, network devices, Windows and Unix/Linux server operating systems, and cross-platform applications. Prerequisite: Admission to the Cyber Security and Systems Administration concentration of the BAS IST program, or permission of the instructor.

ISIT 490 ISIT Capstone I • 5 Cr.

This course provides practical experience in information systems and technology. Students apply knowledge and skills learned in classes as they work in settings relevant to their future employment plans. This is part 1 of a 2 quarter series. Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor.

ISIT 491 ISIT Capstone II • 5 Cr.

Students continue their work from ISIT 490 to further develop their project work. Prerequisite: ISIT 490.

Description starting Summer 2018

Students continue their work from ISIT 490 to further develop their project work. Prerequisite: ISIT 490 with a C or better.

IT 101 Introduction to Information Technology • 5 Cr.

Presents a general overview of information technology. Topics include how computers work, different types of computers, input and data storage devices, operating systems, data communications, systems analysis and design, and ethics. Prerequisite: Placement by assessment into ENGL& 101, or completion of ENGL 092 or 093 with a C or better.

IT 103 Networking Basics • 5 Cr.

Provides an understanding of the basics of networking to students not majoring in Network Support. Topics include: network topologies, media, protocols, hardware and software. This class also covers content listed for the COMPTIA Network+ exam. Course includes practical experience and business case studies. Prerequisite: Placement by assessment into ENGL& 101 or completion of ENGL 092 or 093 with a C or better. Recommended: BTS 161 or equivalent work experience.

IT 128 Information Security Essentials • 5 Cr.

Introduces concepts and issues related to securing information systems and the development of policies to implement information security controls. Topics include security vulnerabilities, threats, defense measures, and the legal and ethical issues associated with information security. Students will learn how to apply security best practices in multiple security architectures. Prerequisite: TECH 217 or IT 103.

IT 194 SPECIAL TOPICS IN INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY • V1-10 Cr.

Allows specialized or in-depth study of a subject related to information technology. Topics are announced in the quarterly schedule. Students may retake the course for credit as content changes. May be repeated for a maximum of 15 credits.

IT 195 SPECIAL TOPICS IN INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY • V1-10 Cr.

Allows specialized or in-depth study of a subject related to information technology. Topics are announced in the quarterly schedule. Students may retake the course for credit as content changes. May be repeated for a maximum of 15 credits.

IT 196 SPECIAL TOPICS IN INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY • V1-10 Cr.

Allows specialized or in-depth study of a subject related to information technology. Topics are announced in the quarterly schedule. Students may retake the course for credit as content changes. May be repeated for a maximum of 15 credits.

IT 197 SPECIAL TOPICS IN INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY • V1-10 Cr.

Allows specialized or in-depth study of a subject related to information technology. Topics are announced in the quarterly schedule. Students may retake the course for credit as content changes. May be repeated for a maximum of 15 credits.

IT 199 Individual Studies in Information Technologies • V1-10 Cr.

No class description found.

IT 270 IT Experiential Learning Capstone • V1-2 Cr.

This course includes a panel interview and reflection of a technical service learning project. This course is for IT degree students only. It provides non-paying, credit-earning, on-the-job experience as a technical consultant. Course is graded credit/no credit. Prerequisite: Entry code.

IT 297 Special Topics in Information Technology • V1-5 Cr.

Allows specialized or in-depth study of a subject related to information technology. Topics are announced in the class schedule. Students may retake the course for credit as content changes. May be repeated for a maximum of 15 credits.

IT 299 Individual Studies in Information Technology • V1-10 Cr.

Covers directed readings, special projects, and independent study by an individual student. May be repeated for a maximum of 15 credits. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.

ITAL 121 Italian I • 5 Cr.

Introduces the fundamentals of vocabulary and grammar focusing on the development of four basic skills: listening, speaking, reading, and writing. Emphasis is placed on active communication aimed at the development of oral and comprehension skills. Various aspects of Italian culture are presented. Format includes extensive audio and internet usage. After successful completion, students are encouraged to continue with ITAL 122.

ITAL 122 Italian II • 5 Cr.

Continues ITAL 121. Format includes extensive audio and internet usage. After successful completion, students are encouraged to continue with ITAL 123. Recommended: ITAL 121, one year of High School or permission of instructor.

ITAL 123 Italian III • 5 Cr.

Continues ITAL 122. Format includes extensive audio and internet usage. Recommended: ITAL 122, two years of High School or permission of instructor.

ITAL 194 Special Topics in Italian • V1-5 Cr.

Allows specialized or in-depth study of a subject supplementing Italian curriculum. Topics are announced in the quarterly schedule. May be repeated for a maximum of 15 credits.

ITAL 195 Special Topics in Italian • V1-5 Cr.

Allows specialized or in-depth study of a subject supplementing Italian curriculum. Topics are announced in the quarterly schedule. May be repeated for a maximum of 15 credits.

ITAL 196 Special Topics in Italian • V1-5 Cr.

Allows specialized or in-depth study of a subject supplementing Italian curriculum. Topics are announced in the quarterly schedule. May be repeated for a maximum of 15 credits.

ITAL 197 Special Topics in Italian • V1-5 Cr.

Allows specialized or in-depth study of a subject supplementing Italian curriculum. Topics are announced in the quarterly schedule. May be repeated for a maximum of 15 credits.

ITAL 294 Special Topics in Italian • V1-5 Cr.

Allows specialized or in-depth study of a subject supplementing Italian curriculum. Topics are announced in the quarterly schedule. May be repeated for a maximum of 15 credits.

ITAL 295 Special Topics in Italian • V1-5 Cr.

Allows specialized or in-depth study of a subject supplementing Italian curriculum. Topics are announced in the quarterly schedule. May be repeated for a maximum of 15 credits.

ITAL 296 Special Topics in Italian • V1-5 Cr.

Allows specialized or in-depth study of a subject supplementing Italian curriculum. Topics are announced in the quarterly schedule. May be repeated for a maximum of 15 credits.

ITAL 297 Special Topics in Italian • V1-5 Cr.

Allows specialized or in-depth study of a subject supplementing Italian curriculum. Topics are announced in the quarterly schedule. May be repeated for a maximum of 15 credits.

JAPN& 121 Japanese I • 5 Cr.

Develops beginning level listening and conversation skills along with reading and writing hiragana and katakana characters. Some relevant aspects of Japanese culture are introduced.

JAPN& 122 Japanese II • 5 Cr.

Continues JAPN& 121. Continues to develop listening, speaking, and reading and writing skills of Japanese. Some basic kanji characters and relevant aspects of Japanese culture are introduced. Recommended: JAPN &121 or permission of instructor.

JAPN& 123 Japanese III • 5 Cr.

Continues JAPN& 122. Continues to develop listening, speaking, and reading and writing skills of Japanese. More basic kanji characters and relevant aspects of Japanese culture are introduced. Recommended: JAPN&122 or permission of instructor.

JAPN 194 Special Topics in Japanese • V1-5 Cr.

No class description found.

JAPN 195 Special Topics in Japanese • V1-5 Cr.

No class description found.

JAPN 196 Special Topics in Japanese • V1-5 Cr.

No class description found.

JAPN 197 Special Topics in Japanese • V1-5 Cr.

No class description found.

JAPN& 221 Japanese IV • 5 Cr.

Continuation of JAPN& 123. Students practice listening, speaking, reading and writing in integrated activities relating to a main theme. More kanji and relevant aspects of Japanese culture are introduced. Recommended: JAPN&123 or permission of instructor.

JAPN& 222 Japanese V • 5 Cr.

Continues JAPN& 221. Students practice listening, speaking, reading and writing in integrated activities relating to a main theme. More kanji and relevant aspects of Japanese culture are introduced. Recommended: JAPN&221 or permission of instructor.

JAPN& 223 Japanese VI • 5 Cr.

Continues JAPN& 222. Students practice listening, speaking, reading and writing in integrated activities relating to a main theme. More kanji and relevant aspects of Japanese culture are introduced. Recommended: JAPN&222 or permission of instructor.

JAPN 294 Special Topics in Japanese • V1-5 Cr.

Allows specialized or in-depth study of a subject supplementing the Japanese curriculum. Topics are announced in the quarterly schedule. May be repeated for a maximum of 15 credits.

JAPN 295 Special Topics in Japanese • V1-5 Cr.

Allows specialized or in-depth study of a subject supplementing the Japanese curriculum. Topics are announced in the quarterly schedule. May be repeated for a maximum of 15 credits.

JAPN 296 Special Topics in Japanese • V1-5 Cr.

Allows specialized or in-depth study of a subject supplementing the Japanese curriculum. Topics are announced in the quarterly schedule. May be repeated for a maximum of 15 credits.

JAPN 297 Special Topics in Japanese • V1-5 Cr.

Allows specialized or in-depth study of a subject supplementing the Japanese curriculum. Topics are announced in the quarterly schedule. May be repeated for a maximum of 15 credits.

MATH 070 Basic Math for the Math Avoiders • 5 Cr.

Builds confidence and skills in arithmetic and pre-algebra. Students discuss symptoms of math anxiety and avoidance, as well as suggestions for overcoming them. Topics include operations with whole numbers, fractions, decimals and percentages, and elements of geometry and pre-algebra. Course is graded pass/fail.

Description starting Summer 2018

Builds confidence and skills in arithmetic and pre-algebra. Students discuss symptoms of math anxiety and avoidance, as well as suggestions for overcoming them. Topics include operations with whole numbers, fractions, decimals and percentages, and elements of geometry and pre-algebra.

MATH 075 Improving Basic Math Skills • 5 Cr.

Provides an opportunity to improve math skills through an individualized program. Topics may include arithmetic, pre-algebra, and/or beginning algebra. Format includes individual and group study. Instructor provides guidance, assistance, and testing. May be repeated for a maximum of 10 credits. Not intended as a substitute for MATH 098 or 099.

MATH 078 Math Literacy • 7 Cr.

This is an overview of algebra in which students build math literacy skills by exploring topics including exponents, radicals, percentages, and various equations. The course emphasizes visualization, interpretation, and communication of mathematics in context. Students learn to persevere by building strategies based on algebraic skills, numerical relationships, and attention to precision. Successful completion of this course meets the prerequisite for MATH&107 and MATH 130. Prerequisites: MATH 070 with a passing grade or MATH 075 with a grade of B or higher, or placement by assessment.

Description starting Summer 2018

This is an overview of algebra in which students build math literacy skills by exploring topics including exponents, radicals, percentages, and various equations. The course emphasizes visualization, interpretation, and communication of mathematics in context. Students learn to persevere by building strategies based on algebraic skills, numerical relationships, and attention to precision. Successful completion of this course meets the prerequisite for MATH&107 and MATH 130. Prerequisites: MATH 070 with a C or higher, or MATH 075 with a grade of B or higher, or placement by assessment.

MATH 080 Elementary Algebra I • 5 Cr.

First in a two-quarter sequence of basic algebra using a lecture/workshop format. Topics include lines and graphs, systems of equations, linear equations, and applications. Format includes self/group study and individual assistance. Intended for students with little or no algebra. Students must complete both MATH 080 and 085 to have the equivalent of MATH 097. Recommended: Basic arithmetic skills.

MATH 084 Learning Strategies for Math Success • 3 Cr.

Through small group interactions and tutoring, MATH 084 builds confidence in students who have struggled trying to learn mathematics. MATH 084 facilitates the understanding of math concepts, learning effective study skills, and overcoming math anxiety/avoidance. MATH 084 students must be simultaneously enrolled in a mathematics course numbered below 100. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.

MATH 085 Elementary Algebra II • 5 Cr.

Second in a two-quarter sequence of basic algebra using a lecture/workshop format. Topics include exponents, polynomials, quadratic equations, rational expressions, and radicals. Students must complete both MATH 080 (or equivalent) and MATH 085 to have the equivalent of MATH 097. Prerequisite: MATH 080 or permission of instructor.

MATH 093 Algebra Review • V1-5 Cr.

Allows students to review some portion of MATH 097, 098, and 099 algebra courses. Students meet with the instructor to develop specific objectives. The course is taught using interactive software. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.

MATH 094 Special Topics in Developmental Math • V1-5 Cr.

Covers additional topics in mathematics. Topics are announced in the class schedule. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.

MATH 097 Introductory Algebra I • 5 Cr.

Introduces basic algebra skills for students with little or no background. Topics include signed numbers and perimeter, area, and volume of basic geometric figures. Introduces algebraic expressions, linear equations, integer exponents, polynomial arithmetic, factoring, radicals, and graphing, as well as applications and model building. Recommended: Basic arithmetic skills.

MATH 098 Essentials of Intermediate Algebra • 5 Cr.

Reviews and expands MATH 097 topics for students with some algebra background. Topics include equations of lines, quadratic equations and parabolas, rational exponents, elementary exponential equations, and elementary rational expressions and equations. Students practice model building and analysis of graphical and numerical data. Prerequisite: Placement by assessment, or MATH 085 or MATH 097 with a C- or better.

MATH 099 Intermediate Algebra • 5 Cr.

Expands algebra skills through an axiomatic approach. Students work with mathematical systems, solution of equations, inequalities, functions, exponents and logarithms, and coordinate systems. This course is similar to second-year high-school algebra. Prerequisite: Placement by assessment, or MATH 098 with a C or better.

MATH& 107 Math in Society • 5 Cr.

Applies mathematics to contemporary issues. Topics include networks, scheduling, data analysis, and may also include voting methods, linear programming, game theory, growth and decay, or fair division problems. Designed for liberal arts students. Fulfills the quantitative or symbolic reasoning course requirement at BC. Prerequisite: Placement by assessment or MATH 098 with a C or better, or MATH 078 with a C or better.

MATH 130 Introduction to Statistics • 5 Cr.

Emphasis on gathering and interpreting data. Material has applications in the medical fields, as well as the Social Sciences. Fulfills the quantitative or symbolic reasoning course at BC. Prerequisite: Placement by assessment or MATH 098 with a C or better, or MATH 078 with a C or better.

MATH& 131 Math for Elementary Education I • 5 Cr.

Study of problem solving strategies, number theory and numeration related to topics taught at the K-8 level. Includes analysis of learning difficulties and teaching strategies for these concepts. Fulfills the quantitative or symbolic reasoning course requirement at BC. Prerequisite: Placement by assessment, or MATH 099 with a C or better.

MATH& 132 Math for Elementary Education II • 5 Cr.

Study of basic probability and statistics, geometry and measurement, and the real number system related to topics taught at the K-8 level. Includes analysis of learning difficulties and teaching strategies for these concepts. Fulfills the quantitative or symbolic reasoning course requirement at BC. Prerequisite: Placement by assessment, MATH 099 with a C or better, or MATH& 131 with a C or better.

MATH 138 College Algebra for Business & Social Science • 5 Cr.

Examines graphs, non-trigonometric elementary functions, systems of e quations and inequalities, and probability, emphasizing uses in business and social science. Either MATH& 141 or MATH 138 may be taken for credit, not both. MATH 138 is required before taking MATH& 148. Fulfills quantitative or symbolic reasoning course requirement at BC. Prerequisite: Placement by assessment, or MATH 099 with a B- or better.

MATH& 141 Precalculus I • 5 Cr.

Emphasizes graphs and polynomial functions. Other topics include the theory of equations and rational, exponential, inverse, and logarithmic functions. Either MATH& 141 or MATH 138 may be taken for credit, not both. Fulfills the quantitative or symbolic reasoning course requirement at BC. Prerequisite: Placement by assessment or MATH 099 with a B- or better.

MATH& 142 Precalculus II • 5 Cr.

Prepares students for the MATH& 151/152/153 calculus sequence. Students work intensively with functional trigonometry, polar coordinates, translation and rotation of axes, plane analytic geometry, lines and planes in space, and non-linear systems. Fulfills the quantitative or symbolic reasoning course requirement at BC. Prerequisite: Placement by assessment, or MATH& 141 with a C- or better.

MATH& 148 Business Calculus • 5 Cr.

Surveys differential and integral calculus, emphasizing uses in business and social science. Intended for students who wish only a brief course in calculus. Either MATH& 151 or MATH& 148 may be taken for credit, not both. Fulfills the quantitative or symbolic reasoning course requirement at BC. Prerequisite: Placement by assessment or MATH 138 with a C- or better.

MATH& 151 Calculus I • 5 Cr.

Introduces the concepts of limits, derivatives, and integrals. Topics include techniques and applications of derivatives of algebraic and transcendental functions. Students begin working with antiderivatives. Either MATH& 151 or MATH& 148 may be taken for credit, not both. Fulfills the quantitative or symbolic reasoning course requirement at BC. Prerequisite: Placement by assessment or MATH& 142 with a C- or better, or Advanced Placement score of 2 or higher on AB or BC exam.

MATH& 152 Calculus II • 5 Cr.

Continues the study of integration, emphasizing applications and special techniques. Students work with algebraic and transcendental functions. Fulfills the quantitative or symbolic reasoning course requirement at BC. Recommended: MATH& 151.

MATH& 153 Calculus III • 5 Cr.

Emphasizes the study of infinite sequences and series including power series. Topics include plane analytic geometry, graphing in polar coordinates, and an introduction to vectors. Fulfills the quantitative or symbolic reasoning course requirement at BC. Recommended: MATH& 152.

MATH 194 Special Topics in MATH • V1-5 Cr.

Covers supplementary, contemporary, or focused topics related to mathematics. Topics are announced in the class schedule. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.

MATH 195 Special Topics in MATH • V1-5 Cr.

Covers supplementary, contemporary, or focused topics related to mathematics. Topics are announced in the class schedule. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.

MATH 196 Special Topics in MATH • V1-5 Cr.

Covers supplementary, contemporary, or focused topics related to mathematics. Topics are announced in the class schedule. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.

MATH 197 Special Topics in MATH • V1-5 Cr.

Covers supplementary, contemporary, or focused topics related to mathematics. Topics are announced in the class schedule. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.

MATH 199 Individual Studies in Mathematics • V1-5 Cr.

Allows directed readings or independent problem solving projects as arranged with an instructor. Primarily intended for students who have completed MATH 126, MATH& 153 or MATH 208 and/or MATH 238. May be repeated for a maximum of 15 credits. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.

MATH 208 Introduction to Linear Algebra • 5 Cr.

Introduces the vocabulary, algebra, and geometry of vector spaces in "R" and function spaces. Students use matrix methods and vectors to explore systems of linear equations and transformations. Also presents elementary theory of eigenvalues. Fulfills the quantitative or symbolic reasoning course requirement at BC. Recommended: MATH& 153.

MATH 238 Differential Equations • 5 Cr.

Uses tools from algebra and calculus in solving first- and second-order linear differential equations. Students focus on applying differential equations in modeling physical situations, and using power series methods and numerical techniques when explicit solutions are unavailable. May include work with Laplace Transforms and systems of differential equations. Fulfills the quantitative or symbolic reasoning course requirement at BC. Recommended: MATH& 153.

MATH 240 Scientific Computation • 5 Cr.

Introduction to numerical methods used to solve problems in the sciences and engineering. Students will use software to solve problems and communicate the results of calculations. Awareness of appropriate software tools to help analyze a physical problem and the limitations and strengths of these tools will be emphasized. Prerequisite: MATH 208. Recommended: MATH 238.

MATH& 254 Calculus IV • 5 Cr.

Extends the concepts of calculus to vector-valued functions and functions of several variables. Partial derivatives are included. Fulfills the quantitative or symbolic reasoning course requirement at BC. Recommended: MATH& 152.

MATH 255 Vector Calculus • 5 Cr.

Course topics include multiple integration, line and surface integrals and the theorems of Green, Gauss and Stokes with applications. Related topics such as conservative vector fields, change of variables in special coordinate systems, the higher-dimensional Taylor's Theorem and constrained optimization will be considered. Prerequisite: Multivariable Calculus (MATH& 254).

MATH 270 Probability and Statistical Models • 5 Cr.

The fundamentals of probability-based statistics with a focus on data-based problem solving. Introduces probability axioms and principles of randomness to model and evaluate samples from discrete, continuous, univariate, and multivariate distributions. Varying statistical techniques (with use of software such as MATLAB or R) will be included. Prerequisite: MATH& 152 with a B- or better. Recommended: MATH& 153.

MATH 299 Individual Studies in Mathematics • V1-5 Cr.

Allows directed readings or independent problem solving projects as arranged with an instructor. Primarily intended for students who have completed MATH 126, MATH& 153 or MATH 208 and/or MATH 238. May be repeated for a maximum of 15 credits. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.

MATH 301 Discrete Mathematics • 5 Cr.

This class introduces basic discrete structures in mathematics, computer science and engineering fields. Topics include elementary logic, set theory, mathematical proof, relations, combinatorics, induction, recursion, sequence and recurrence, trees, graph theory. Prerequisite: MATH 208 with a C or better or entry code.

Description starting Summer 2018

This class introduces basic discrete structures in mathematics, computer science and engineering fields. Topics include elementary logic, set theory, mathematical proof, relations, combinatorics, induction, recursion, sequence and recurrence, trees, graph theory. Prerequisite: MATH 208 with a C or better and admission to BS CS program, or entry code.

MATH 341 Applied Statistical Methods I • 5 Cr.

This class covers probability theory and applications including trees and Venn diagrams, conditional probability, contingency tables, independence and Bayes theorem. It will cover random variables and sampling distributions (binomial, Poisson, normal, exponential, geometric and hypergeometric ) and their use in confidence intervals and hypothesis testing such as t-tests, z-tests, one and two sample mean and proportions, chi-squared; ANOVA. The focus will be on real world examples from a variety of sources and using statistical software such as Excel, Minitab, SAS or R. Students should expect to produce reports and presentations. Prerequisite: BA 240 and admission into Data Analytics program, or permission of the instructor.

Description starting Summer 2018

This class covers probability theory and applications including trees and Venn diagrams, conditional probability, contingency tables, independence and Bayes theorem. It will cover random variables and sampling distributions (binomial, Poisson, normal, exponential, geometric and hypergeometric ) and their use in confidence intervals and hypothesis testing such as t-tests, z-tests, one and two sample mean and proportions, chi-squared; ANOVA. The focus will be on real world examples from a variety of sources and using statistical software such as Excel, Minitab, SAS or R. Students should expect to produce reports and presentations. Prerequisite: BA 240 with a C or better and admission into BAS Data Analytics program, or permission of the instructor.

MATH 342 Applied Statistical Methods II • 5 Cr.

This class will focus on various types of general linear models including simple and multiple regression, and log-linear models, as well as stepwise regression, logistic regression, and analysis of variance/covariance. The focus will be on real world examples from a variety of sources and using statistical software such as Excel, Minitab, SAS or R. Students should expect to produce reports and presentations. Prerequisite: MATH 341 or entry code.

Description starting Summer 2018

This class will focus on various types of general linear models including simple and multiple regression, and log-linear models, as well as stepwise regression, logistic regression, and analysis of variance/covariance. The focus will be on real world examples from a variety of sources and using statistical software such as Excel, Minitab, SAS or R. Students should expect to produce reports and presentations. Prerequisite: MATH 341 with a C or better, or permission of the instructor.

MBS 320 Molecular Biosciences Seminar • 2 Cr.

This course provides strategies for reading and analyzing articles in molecular biosciences. Students engage in discussion while they learn to evaluate data, analyze figures and focus on the major questions addressed in a scientific paper. Prerequisite: BIOL& 211 or BIOL 275 wit h a C or higher.

MBS 330 Modern Genetics • 5 Cr.

This course examines the principles of inheritance, the molecular nature of the gene and regulation of gene expression in various systems, and the basis for mutation, variation and evolution. The course begins with an introduction to Mendel's experiments and culminates in a survey of modern methods in genetics research. Prerequisite: BIOL& 160 or BIOL& 211 with C or higher.

MBS 340 Molecular Cell Biology • 5 Cr.

Exploration of cellular structure, organization, dynamics and signaling of diverse cell types at the molecular level. The course emphasizes the experiments and techniques used throughout the research process. Topics include biological membranes, protein targeting, the endomembrane system, cell signaling, the cytoskeleton and control of the cell cycle. Prerequisite: MBS 330 or equivalent, with C or higher.

MBS 350 Bioinformatics • 5 Cr.

Topics include protein and DNA sequence alignments, evolutionary analysis and phylogenetic trees, obtaining protein secondary structure from sequence, and analysis of gene expression including clustering methods. Prerequisite: MBS 340 or equivalent, with a C or higher.

MBS 410 Modern Topics in Bioethics • 5 Cr.

This class introduces ethical problems relating to molecular biosciences research and the biomedical industry. The emphasis is to train students on awareness of ethical issues specifically applicable to laboratory research and biomedical industry. Prerequisite: MBS 330 or equivalent, with a C or higher.

MBS 430 Systems Immunology • 5 Cr.

This course is an introduction to molecular immunology. Topics include an overview of the immune system, antibody and T-cell receptor structure and function, genes of the immunoglobulin family, cells and molecules that mediate the immune response, and medical applications of modern immunology. Prerequisites: MBS 340 and CHEM 406 and with a C or higher.

MBS 455 Advanced Methods in Molecular Biology • 6 Cr.

Topics for this advanced lab class include molecular biology, protein biochemistry and immunochemistry techniques. Prerequisites: MBS 340 or equivalent with a C or higher, or permission of the instructor and admission into the BAS in Molecular Biosciences program.

MBS 470 Introduction to Patent Law • 2 Cr.

Topics include the four basic forms of intellectual property, patents and patentability, patent challenges and litigation, drafting and prosecuting a patent. Prerequisites: MBS 340 or equivalent with a C or higher, or permission of the instructor.

MBS 480 Senior Capstone Proposal • 1 Cr.

First course in a sequence of three senior level capstone classes. Students will select a research topic, formulate a relevant research question, choose a research mentor, and design a detailed plan to answer their research question. Prerequisites: MBS 350 with a C or higher, or permission of the Program Chair and acceptance into the BAS in Molecular Biosciences.

MBS 481 Senior Capstone Project I • 4 Cr.

Second course in a sequence of three senior level capstone classes. Each student works on her/his research proposal developed during MBS 480, collecting and analyzing data, documenting results and completing approximately half of the project. Prerequisites: MBS 480 with a C or higher, or permission of the Program Chair of Molecular Biosciences.

MBS 482 Senior Capstone Project II • 5 Cr.

Last course in the capstone project sequence where students complete their research. The project culminates with the preparation of a scientific poster and a seminar to be presented to the students and faculty in the Molecular Biosciences program. Prerequisites: MBS 481 with a C or higher, or permission of the Program Chair of Molecular Biosciences.

METR 101 Introduction to the Weather • 5 Cr.

Introduces the study of the weather, including atmospheric properties and processes that control temperature, wind, precipitation, and storm systems. Students also discuss weather forecasting, air pollution, and climate change. Format may include field trips and guest lectures.

METR 199 Individual Studies in Meteorology • V1-5 Cr.

Allows for special projects, student research and independent study in Meteorology by an individual student. May be repeated for a maximum of 15 credits. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.

METR 211 Global Warming: Causes and Consequences • 5 Cr.

Provides an overview of the earth's climate system, and discusses how dynamic changes in the climate have occurred in the past and are occurring now. Specific topics include global warming, ozone depletion, El Nino/La Nina, and the impacts of climate change on human society and the biosphere.

MKTG 101 Introduction to Marketing • 5 Cr.

Provides an introduction to the field of marketing. Students explore the larger business story and how marketing is reshaping that in the 21st century. The class introduces sub disciplines such as advertising, consumer behavior, research, strategy, analytics, creative execution, sales, and customer relationship management. MKTG 101 replaced MKTG 154. Either MKTG 101 or 154 can be taken for credit, not both.

MKTG 102 Intro to Digital Marketing Platforms • 5 Cr.

Provides an introduction to digital marketing concepts and how they can be used in a larger integrated marketing campaign. Students explore search engine marketing (SEM), search engine optimization (SEO), display advertising, online video, social media, mobile marketing, content creation, ecommerce, and digital measurement/analytics.

MKTG 103 Intro to Sports Marketing • 1 Cr.

Provides an introduction to the exciting world of sports marketing, as well as the career paths that are available to skilled marketing practitioners. This class is taught in tandem with Introduction to Marketing and Introduction to Digital Marketing Platforms, and offers students the chance to build integrated marketing plans that are specific to the sports industry.

Description starting Summer 2018

Provides an introduction to the exciting world of sports marketing, as well as the career paths that are available to skilled marketing practitioners. This class complements Introduction to Marketing and Introduction to Digital Marketing Platforms, and offers students the chance to build integrated marketing plans that are specific to the sports industry. Recommended: MKTG 101.

MKTG 104 Intro to Fashion Marketing • 1 Cr.

An introductory class that connects the essentials of marketing to the fashion industry. Case studies will be presented in class that demonstrate how marketing strategy was applied in a number of fashion-related business activities. Students will engage in business research to uncover problems and opportunities; establish objectives and goals to guide their work; develop a marketing strategy that helps achieve those goals; implement tactics that ladder up to the integrated strategy; and employ metrics to ensure that the marketing campaign was successful.

Description starting Summer 2018

An introductory class that connects the essentials of marketing to the fashion industry. Case studies will be presented in class that demonstrate how marketing strategy was applied in a number of fashion-related business activities. Students will engage in business research to uncover problems and opportunities; establish objectives and goals to guide their work; develop a marketing strategy that helps achieve those goals; implement tactics that ladder up to the integrated strategy; and employ metrics to ensure that the marketing campaign was successful. Recommended: MKTG 101.

MKTG 105 Intro to Music Marketing • 1 Cr.

Provides an introduction to the exciting world of music marketing, as well as the career paths that are available to skilled marketing practitioners. This class is taught in tandem with Introduction to Marketing and Introduction to Digital Marketing Platforms, and offers students the chance to build integrated marketing plans that are specific to the music industry.

Description starting Summer 2018

Provides an introduction to the exciting world of music marketing, as well as the career paths that are available to skilled marketing practitioners. This class complements Introduction to Marketing and Introduction to Digital Marketing Platforms, and offers students the chance to build integrated marketing plans that are specific to the music industry. Recommended: MKTG 101.

MKTG 106 Intro to Film & TV Marketing • 1 Cr.

Provides an introduction to the exciting world of film and television marketing, as well as the career paths that are available to skilled marketing practitioners. This class is taught in tandem with Introduction to Marketing and Introduction to Digital Marketing Platforms, and offers students the chance to build integrated marketing plans that are specific to the entertainment industry.

Description starting Summer 2018

Provides an introduction to the exciting world of film and television marketing, as well as the career paths that are available to skilled marketing practitioners. This class complements Introduction to Marketing and Introduction to Digital Marketing Platforms, and offers students the chance to build integrated marketing plans that are specific to the entertainment industry. Recommended: MKTG 101.

MKTG 110 Client Customer Relations • 5 Cr.

Covers the key elements to providing quality customer service, ensuring repeat business for the company and opportunities for employees to advance their careers. The class explores how to troubleshoot customer concerns, implement company policies, communicate effectively in a service role, and identify opportunities to go above and beyond to create a win-win situation for both parties.

MKTG 131 Principles of Professional Selling • 5 Cr.

Examines the principles and techniques of professional selling as a form of persuasive communication basic to business relationships. Students analyze case studies to apply theories to real-world situations.

MKTG 135 Principles of Retailing • 5 Cr.

Examines the fundamental principles and practices of retail merchandising. Students discuss types, location, layout, organization, profit planning, and operating costs of retail outlets.

MKTG 190 Introduction to DECA • 2 Cr.  New

Description starting Summer 2018

DECA is an intercollegiate academic sport, where students participate in marketing and business events that simulate real world activity. In this introductory course, students learn the basics about competition while participating in community service projects.

MKTG 199 Individual Studies in Marketing • V1-10 Cr.

Covers directed readings, special projects, or independent study. Or, allows the student to earn credit for current on-the-job experience. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.

MKTG 200 International Marketing • 5 Cr.

This course builds on the fundamentals of MKTG 101 and applies learning to the international business landscape. Students consider the impact of marketing environment variables such as politics, religion, economies, technological advancements, weather, and terrain. Differences between countries are considered and help shape a global strategic approach to a multi-market campaign. Recommended: MKTG 101.

MKTG 201 Product Development in the Marketing Process • 5 Cr.

Explores the steps necessary to develop a new product idea and bring it to market. Students will conduct research that includes idea generation, product viability, competitive analysis, and consumer needs analysis. Creative brainstorming is balanced with regulatory concerns, licensing, and other challenges related to initial product development. Recommended: MKTG 101.

MKTG 202 Prototyping and Pricing Concerns • 5 Cr.

Students have hands-on experience translating product development ideas in to working models. Prototyping tools allow course participants to create physical models. Product ideation is coupled with price sensitivity research to ensure that ideas will be successful when brought to market. Recommended: MKTG 101.

MKTG 203 Manufacturing and Distribution • 5 Cr.  New

Description starting Summer 2018

Students address implementation of product ideas from production to appropriate sales channels. The course covers the creation, assembly, distribution, and retail promotion aspects of entrepreneurial marketing. Project management, transportation, warehousing, shipping, outsourcing, and partnerships are all explored to guide successful marketing operations.

MKTG 204 Fundraising and Financing in the Era of Digital • 5 Cr.  New

Description starting Summer 2018

Considers the relationship between marketing and securing funds to implement new ideas and product extensions. Students will consider new and evolving methods of financing that align with digital acceleration, the proliferation of startups, and the adoption of lean methodologies. Recommended: MKTG 101.

MKTG 205 Product Innovation & Continued Growth • 5 Cr.  New

Description starting Summer 2018

Acknowledging products have life cycles, this course explores methods to extend and reinvent brands to identify future revenue opportunities. The adoption of supporting services, relationship marketing, and a brand ecosystem approach are considered, leading students to articulate a path forward with product innovation and long-term growth. Recommended: MKTG 101.

MKTG 211 Multicultural Marketing • 5 Cr.

Explores the large number of underrepresented communities and subcultures that exist within the United States, and how the field of marketing is trying to adapt and change to communicate authentically with these consumers. The class offers students practical, activity-based instruction along with lectures and case studies to provide context and ideas for application. Recommended: MKTG 101.

MKTG 234 Advertising I • 5 Cr.

Provides an in-depth look at the world's dominant promotional channel. Students consider how advertising differs from other approaches, and the ways in which it must evolve to thrive in the digital era. Group projects will emphasize integrated strategy, creative choices, media planning, and how to assess a successful advertising campaign. Recommended: MKTG 101.

MKTG 241 Search Engine Strategy • 5 Cr.

Students will learn the fundamentals of search engine marketing (SEM) and search engine optimization (SEO), and how those skills impact a larger digital framework. While a hands-on course, the curriculum is focused on the application of search skills to craft an integrated marketing strategy and executive vision. Recommended: MKTG 102. Previously MKTG 240. Either MKTG 240 or 241 can be taken for credit, not both.

MKTG 242 Social Media Strategy • 5 Cr.

Students will learn the fundamentals of social media advertising and marketing, and how those skills impact a larger digital framework. While a hands-on course, the curriculum is focused on the application of social media skills to craft an integrated marketing strategy and executive vision. Recommended: MKTG 102.

MKTG 243 Mobile Marketing Strategy • 5 Cr.

Students will learn the fundamentals of mobile advertising and marketing, and how those skills impact a larger digital framework. While a hands-on course, the curriculum is focused on the application of mobile skills to craft an integrated marketing strategy and executive vision. Recommended: MKTG 102.

MKTG 244 Online Video and TV Strategy • 5 Cr.

Students will review the evolution from television to online video, including advertising. The class explores how marketing strategies and video tactics support the larger digital framework. While a hands-on course, the curriculum is focused on the application of video skills to craft an integrated marketing strategy and executive vision. Recommended: MKTG 102.

MKTG 245 Display Media Strategy • 5 Cr.

This class builds on ideas introduced in MKTG 102 and covers intermediate and advanced concepts of display media. Students will learn about ad networks, exchanges, programmatic media buying, takeovers, and native advertising. They will apply those skills to the larger digital framework and craft integrated marketing strategies. Recommended: MKTG 102.

MKTG 255 Relationship Marketing • 5 Cr.

Provides an introduction to the field of relationship marketing. Topics include the evolution from one time sales to ongoing brand relationships, lifetime customer value, loyalty programs, customer service software, sales technologies, marketing automation, and customer relationship management (CRM) tools. The class offers students practical, hands-on instruction along with case studies. Recommended: MKTG 101. Previously MKTG 225. Either MKTG 225 or 255 can be taken for credit, not both.

MKTG 261 Marketing Research I • 5 Cr.

Provides an in-depth look at how marketing utilizes business research to solve problems, uncover opportunities, and drive additional revenue. Students will get hands-on experience with business question formulation, data analysis and interpretation, presenting findings to business leaders, and managerial decision-making. Recommended: MKTG 101. Previously MKTG 210. Only MKTG 210 or 261 can be taken for credit, not both.

MKTG 262 Measurement and Analytics • 5 Cr.

Provides an in-depth look at marketing measurement, reporting and analytics. Students will get hands-on experience with collecting and housing data sets, establishing business rules for data manipulation, aligning key performance indicators to larger business concerns, data visualization techniques, and interpreting and presenting findings key decision makers. Recommended: MKTG 102.

MKTG 271 Consumer Behavior • 5 Cr.

Provides an in-depth look at how consumer thinking impacts the choices they make when purchasing goods and services or adopting ideas and beliefs. The class builds on how these concepts can be used to shape marketing strategy and develop integrated campaigns. Recommended: MKTG 101.

MKTG 276 Chinese Business Culture and Consumer Behavior • 5 Cr.

China provides many business opportunities, opening doors for new careers. This interactive course examines how cultural differences affect personal and business actions. Emphasizing "Guanxi" (the nature of relationships), students will both network with business leaders and develop effective business strategies.

MKTG 277 Fashion Marketing and Merchandising • 5 Cr.

This course provides students with a foundational knowledge of the fashion industry, and how marketing efforts are employed to maximize profits and build brand equity. Participants apply business and marketing skills to conceptualize and promote fashion products, which includes merchandising in the retail environment. Recommended: MKTG 101.

MKTG 278 Fashion Design • 5 Cr.

This course provides an overview on the principles of design that inform fashion product development. Students will review textiles, the use of color, scale and proportion, social context, and which tools are used by fashion professionals to execute their work. Recommended: MKTG 101.

MKTG 290 Marketing Activities in DECA • V1-5 Cr.

Develops occupational skills through activities affiliated with National DECA. Students participate in community service projects and gain leadership, communication, and human relations experience. Chapter officers help lead the class.

MKTG 291 DECA Leadership • 5 Cr.  New

Description starting Summer 2018

In this advanced course, students serve as officers for the school's DECA team, providing guidance for other activity participants. These governance roles allow students to practice business management and develop practical examples of leadership. Recommended: MKTG 190 and/or MKTG 290.

MKTG 292 Marketing Internship • V1-5 Cr.

After securing internship placement students gain practical experience within the marketing management industry environment which they use as preparation for work readiness. The internship should consist of 3 - 15 hours (depending on number of Credits) weekly engagement with the organization; students will also meet weekly with the instructor and discuss work activities. Variable Credit based on hours worked in internship. Prerequisite: Permission of Program Chair.

Description starting Summer 2018

Provides an opportunity to apply learning in a real work environment. Students identify and secure the internship, help is available from faculty and the Center for Career Connections if needed. Students are expected to work the full quarter at the internship. Employers will work with the student to establish a learning plan, which will be evaluated and approved by the Program Chair. Faculty will meet once a week with the student to review their progress. Prerequisite: Permission of Program Chair.

MKTG 294 Special Topics in Marketing • V1-10 Cr.

Allows specialized or in-depth study of a subject related to marketing.

MKTG 295 Special Topics in Marketing • V1-10 Cr.

Allows specialized or in-depth study of a subject related to marketing.

MKTG 296 Special Topics in Marketing • V1-10 Cr.

Allows specialized or in-depth study of a subject related to marketing.

MKTG 297 Special Topics in Marketing • V1-10 Cr.

Allows specialized or in-depth study of a subject related to marketing.

MKTG 299 Individual Studies in Marketing • V1-10 Cr.

Covers directed readings, special projects, and independent study by an individual student. May be repeated for a maximum of 15 credits. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.

MKTG 301 Media Planning and Buying • 5 Cr.

Media continues to be central to marketing efforts, even as there is a shift from paid impressions to owned and earned activity. Students will explore the roles of media buying and media planning, tackling hands-on projects and communicating the value of different media options to clients and internal partners. Prerequisite: Admission to the BAS Digital Marketing program or permission of instructor.

MKTG 333 Content Creation • 5 Cr.

This course will introduce students to content marketing and digital content creation. Students will learn about the different types of digital content while developing strategies that include managing user-generated and original content, creating new content using software tools and resources, and sharing content across digital platforms. Prerequisite: Admission to the BAS Digital Marketing program or permission of instructor.

MKTG 334 Advertising II • 5 Cr.

This advanced promotional marketing course builds on ideas explored in Advertising I, with a strong emphasis on building strategies that drive smart integrated marketing plans. Students will focus more heavily on digital storytelling, and how efforts in these new digital advertising channels resonate with consumers. Prerequisite: Admission to the BAS Digital Marketing program or permission of instructor.

MKTG 341 Public Relations and Social Listening • 5 Cr.

This promotional marketing course builds on the shift from employing mass media to having conversations with consumers. Social listening tools are employed to document how brands manage their reputations. Students will craft brand communications, measure brand equity, consider data for insights, and engage consumers across digital channels. Prerequisite: Admission to the BAS Digital Marketing program or permission of instructor.

MKTG 343 Event Marketing • 5 Cr.

This course connects online consumer engagement with offline promotional activities that result in purchases. Events of all types are employed to drive immediate actions and build brand equity. Students will consider consumer motivations, design event tactics, leverage unique data sets, and contribute to relationship marketing efforts with key customers. Prerequisite: Admission to the BAS Digital Marketing program or permission of instructor.

MKTG 434 Branding • 5 Cr.

This marketing course builds on ideas explored in Advertising I and II, expanding the promotional aspect of communicating ideas with customers to a larger brand identity building framework. Students will consider successful branding case studies, and then craft their own brand along with appropriate marketing materials in this innovative course. Prerequisite: Admission to the BAS Digital Marketing program or permission of instructor.

MKTG 461 Marketing Research II • 5 Cr.

This advanced marketing course builds on the research process introduced in MKTG 261: Marketing Research I. Students will continue working with local businesses to identify marketing challenges, formulate research problems, design an approach to data collection, handle data sets and derive insights, and make the insights actionable to stakeholders. Prerequisite: Admission to the BAS Digital Marketing program or permission of instructor.

MKTG 462 Data Visualization & Advanced Analytics • 5 Cr.

A continuation of materials first explored in MKTG 262: Measurement and Analytics, students will delve deeper on how analytics is maturing from static data reports to complex predictive modeling. Hands-on practice with data visualization and manipulation tools is balanced with the strategic implementation of analytics. Prerequisite: Admission to the BAS Digital Marketing program or permission of instructor.

MKTG 492 Capstone • 5 Cr.

Credit is offered for an end-of-program project or professional internship that is aligned with the digital marketing curriculum. This course requires students to define the specific opportunity before enrolling or at the very beginning of the course with the course instructor. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. Prerequisite: Admission to the BAS Digital Marketing program and permission of instructor.

MUSC 100 Concert Choir I • V1-3 Cr.

Ensemble provides vocal performance opportunities of traditional choral literature, great masterworks and musical theater scenes. Covers vocal production, reading music, and musical expression. Includes daily and scheduled rehearsals, and performances outside of class. May be repeated for a maximum of 9 credits. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor, upon audition for ensemble.

MUSC 101 Community Symphonies • 1 Cr.

Students earn credit for playing in approved community orchestras or ensembles. Provides an opportunity to perform a wide variety of literature. Rehearsals are usually one evening per week. May be repeated for a maximum of 6 credits. Participation may require audition. Prerequisite: Permission of program chair for approved ensembles.

MUSC 102 Community Band • 1 Cr.

Students earn credit for playing in approved community bands or wind ensembles. Provides an opportunity to perform a wide variety of literature. Rehearsals are usually one evening per week. May be repeated for a maximum of 6 credits. Participation may require audition. Prerequisite: Permission of program chair for approved ensembles.

MUSC 103 Chamber Choir • 3 Cr.

A performance class open to advanced vocalists by audition. Chamber choir includes five hours of rehearsal per week plus scheduled outside rehearsals and performances. Course is designed to expose students to the most advanced musical idioms on a regular basis, including madrigals, Baroque, classical and romantic period literature. Course may be repeated for a maximum of 9 credits. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor (audition) and concurrent enrollment in MUSC 100.

MUSC 104 Small Instrumental & Vocal Ensembles • 2 Cr.

Includes woodwinds, strings, brass, and jazz combos. Students develop technique, independence of part, and sensitivity. Requires two hours rehearsal per week plus scheduled performances. May be repeated for a maximum of 12 credits. Prerequisite: For all students, permission of instructor, for vocal students, concurrent enrollment in MUSC 100 or MUSC 200 for 3 of their 6 quarters.

MUSC& 105 Music Appreciation • 5 Cr.

Develops listening skills and an understanding of how elements of music are used by composers, while exploring the history of music in western civilization. Class activities include lectures, written materials and a variety of listening experiences including attendance at live musical events.

MUSC 106 Jazz Band • 3 Cr.

Offers performance opportunities for instrumentalists within the Stage Band instrumentation. The Jazz Band focuses on jazz improvisation, performance, and interpretation of Big Band jazz literature. Students audition for available chairs. May be repeated for a maximum of 9 credits. Prerequisite: Prior enrollment in MUSC 106 or permission of instructor.

MUSC 107 Fundamentals of Music • 5 Cr.

Introduces the structure of music and its notation. Students learn to read and write basic pitch and rhythm notation and to construct scales, chords, and melodies. Intended for non-majors with little or no musical experience.

MUSC 109 Vocal Jazz & Recording Ensemble • 3 Cr.

Develops the vocal techniques, performance, and recording skills necessary to the contemporary recording studio singer. Ensemble members are selected by audition from the college choir. May be repeated for a maximum of 9 credits. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor (audition) by entry code. Students registered in MUSC 109 must be concurrently registered in MUSC 100 unless waived by the department.

MUSC 110 First-Year Theory I • 5 Cr.

First of a six-course sequence in Music Theory for music majors and students who wish to compose. Students learn notation, rhythm, scales, keys, intervals, chords, voicing, chord progression, harmony, and composition. Sight singing and ear training are also included. Prerequisite: Basic knowledge of music notation and either vocal or instrumental performance capability.

MUSC 111 First-Year Theory II • 5 Cr.

Second of a six-course sequence in Music Theory for music majors and students who wish to compose. Students learn notation, rhythm, scales, keys, intervals, chords, voicing, chord progression, harmony, and composition. Sight singing and ear training are also included. Prerequisite: MUSC 110 or permission of instructor.

MUSC 112 First-Year Theory III • 5 Cr.

Third of a six-course sequence in Music Theory for music majors and students who wish to compose. Students learn notation, rhythm, scales, keys, intervals, chords, voicing, chord progression, harmony, and composition. Sight singing and ear training are also included. Prerequisite: MUSC 111 or permission of instructor.

MUSC 113 Survey of Music History: Antiquity to 1800 • 5 Cr.

Reviews the development of music from its origins to its emergence as a major art form by 1800. Course format includes lectures, demonstrations, research about prominent composers and styles, and development of listening skills.

MUSC 114 Survey of Music History: 1800 to Present • 5 Cr.

Reviews the development of music from the Romantic period through the 20th century. Course format includes lectures, demonstrations, listening exercises, and research work. May be taken independently of MUSC 113.

MUSC 115 History of Jazz • 5 Cr.

Surveys the development of Jazz from its origins in New Orleans, through the big bands of the swing era, to the development of Bop, the fusion of Rock and Jazz, as well as techno Jazz. Course includes lectures, listening activities, some research, and demonstrations.

MUSC 116 History of Rock & Roll • 5 Cr.

Traces the development of Rock and Roll from its roots in Jazz, Rhythm and Blues, Hillbilly, and Country idioms. Covers both instrumental and vocal styles from Elvis, the British invasion, heavy metal, Britney Spears, and other contemporary performers. Students learn to identify styles, musical characteristics, artists, and periods of music through listening, group discussion, and written texts.

MUSC 117 Music of the World • 5 Cr.

Examines the varied ways music is used and performed in selected non-Western cultures, such as Africa, India, the Middle East, China, Japan, Indonesia, Latin America, and Native North America. Includes styles and methods of music making, music's relationship to religion, magic, social structure, language, politics, philosophy and aesthetics, and the impact of historical migration and dispersions of ethnic groups.

MUSC 118 History of Music in Film • 5 Cr.

Presents a comprehensive survey of the history of film music from the genre's precursory influences to the present day. Topics include: historically significant film composers from the Hollywood and international scenes, genre specific film scoring trends and compositional techniques, and an overview of the film music business. Recommended: College level reading and writing skills. Past experience performing or composing music is helpful but not necessary.

MUSC 120 Class Voice Vocal Group Instruction • 2 Cr.

Offers group instruction for students who have not had individual voice training. Students learn voice science, vocal production, pronunciation, style, music notation, and some music literature.

MUSC 126 Beginning College Choir • 3 Cr.

A non-audition vocal ensemble. Open to all students interested in the basics of choral singing. Students rehearse and perform choral music from a variety of eras and styles. Includes the study of vocal technique and choral musicianship skills. Quarterly concerts are required.

MUSC 130 Group Piano Instruction I • 2 Cr.

Provides basic keyboard experience for non-majors and prepares the beginning music major for the piano-competency requirement. Studio instruction includes basic music reading, keyboard technique, interpretation, and simple chording.

MUSC 131 Group Piano Instruction II • 2 Cr.

Continues MUSC 130 with more advanced keyboard and music reading skills. Students learn more keys, chord combinations, and performance of more complex compositions. Prerequisite: MUSC 130 or permission of instructor.

MUSC 132 Group Piano Instruction III • 2 Cr.

Continues MUSC 131 with intermediate level piano keyboard repertory. Recommended: Completion of MUSC 131.

MUSC 135 Beginning Guitar • 2 Cr.

Presents the basic skills for reading music and the techniques needed to play the guitar. Intended for students with little or no background in guitar performance. Students must supply their own ACOUSTIC guitar.

MUSC 136 Intermediate Guitar • 2 Cr.

Develops the skills and knowledge required for playing the guitar, reading music and performance techniques in greater depth. Intended for students with a moderate level of experience. Students must supply their own ACOUSTIC guitar.

MUSC 139 Private Instruction-Exploring Voice/Instrument • 1 Cr.

Provides one-on-one instruction for non-music majors and students wishing to explore or begin studying an instrument or voice. Instruction must be provided by an approved teacher with at least one 30 minute lesson per week. Students pay the cost of lessons. Prerequisite: Permission of department chair.

MUSC 140 First-Year Private Instruction I • 1 Cr.

Provides one-on-one instruction on a variety of instruments or voice from beginning to advanced levels. Instruction must be provided by an approved teacher with at least one 30 to 45 minute lesson per week. Private lesson fee is added to normal college fees. May be repeated for a maximum of 3 credits in three quarters. Prerequisite: Permission of program chair.

MUSC 143 First-Year Private Instruction II • 2 Cr.

Provides one-on-one instruction on a variety of instruments or voice from beginning to advanced levels. Instruction must be provided by an approved teacher with at least one 60 minute lesson per week. Students pay the cost of lessons. May be repeated for a maximum of 4 credits. Prerequisite: Permission of program chair.

MUSC 150 Music Technology • 5 Cr.

Explores electronic and synthesized music. Students learn sound theory and become familiar with historical and current hardware and software for writing and sequencing music. Lecture/demonstration format.

MUSC 151 MIDI Sequencing I • 3 Cr.

Gives hands-on opportunities to create music using the equipment introduced in MUSC 150. Students complete at least three sequences. May be repeated for a maximum of 18 credits. Prerequisite: MUSC 150. Highly recommended: Basic piano and keyboard experience or permission of instructor.

MUSC 152 Advanced MIDI & Digital Audio Techniques • 3 Cr.

Students learn sophisticated MIDI sequencing and Digital Audio techniques, how to combine these technologies into an effective studio workstation, and how to synchronize music with other media and technology. Prerequisite: MUSC 151 or entry code.

MUSC 153 Digital Recording Production • 5 Cr.

Covers recording and editing skills in digital media. Students learn digital recording, computer-based mix down, digital I/O, utilizing digital effects, and sampling in a 24-channel ADAT and direct-to-disk recording studio. Prerequisite: Completion of MUSC 156 with a C- or better or permission of instructor. Recommended: DMA 152.

MUSC 156 Audio Engineering & Production I • 5 Cr.

Introduces professional studio control room equipment, microphone use and placement for recording acoustic and electronic instruments, listening skills, basic electronics and acoustics and studio design and workflow.

MUSC 157 Audio Engineering & Production II • 5 Cr.

Students gain experience in recording, mixing down, and burning CD music projects by working with analog and digital mixing consoles. Course covers the history and theories of multi-track technology, analog and digital recording. Prerequisite: MUSC 156.

MUSC 158 Audio Engineering & Production III • 5 Cr.

Covers intermediate techniques in recording, mixing down, and mastering music projects. Students work with analog and digital mixing consoles. Includes the history and theories of multi-track technology, analog and digital recording. Prerequisite: MUSC 156 and permission of instructor. Recommended: MUSC 157.

MUSC 161 Community Musical Production • V1-5 Cr.

No class description found.

MUSC 194 Special Topics in Music • V1-3 Cr.

Allows specialized or in-depth study of a subject supplementing the music curriculum. Student interest and instructor expertise help determine the topic, to be announced in the class schedule. May be repeated for a maximum of 10 credits. Prerequisite: Permission of program chair or instructor.

MUSC 195 Special Topics in Music • V1-3 Cr.

Allows specialized or in-depth study of a subject supplementing the music curriculum. Student interest and instructor expertise help determine the topic, to be announced in the class schedule. May be repeated for a maximum of 10 credits. Prerequisite: Permission of program chair or instructor.

MUSC 196 Special Topics in Music • V1-3 Cr.

Allows specialized or in-depth study of a subject supplementing the music curriculum. Student interest and instructor expertise help determine the topic, to be announced in the class schedule. May be repeated for a maximum of 10 credits. Prerequisite: Permission of program chair or instructor.

MUSC 197 Special Topics in Music • V1-3 Cr.

Allows specialized or in-depth study of a subject supplementing the music curriculum. Student interest and instructor expertise help determine the topic, to be announced in the class schedule. May be repeated for a maximum of 10 credits. Prerequisite: Permission of program chair or instructor.

MUSC 200 Concert Choir II • V1-3 Cr.

Offers performance opportunities for student singers who have completed three quarters of MUSC 100. Students gain understanding and skills essential to group and choral singing. Requires 5 hours of rehearsal per week plus scheduled outside rehearsals and performances. May be repeated for a maximum of 9 credits. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor, upon audition for ensemble.

MUSC 203 Chamber Choir • 3 Cr.

A performance class open to advanced vocalists by audition. Chamber choir includes five hours of rehearsal per week plus scheduled outside rehearsals and performances. Course is designed to expose students to the most advanced musical idioms on a regular basis, including madrigals, Baroque, classical and romantic period literature. Course may be repeated for a maximum of 9 credits. Prerequisite: Completion of 9 credits in MUSC 103 and permission of instructor (audition). Students must schedule MUSC 100 for 3 of their 6 quarters in music.

MUSC 205 Vocal Jazz Ensemble • 3 Cr.

Develops the vocal techniques, performance, and recording skills necessary to the contemporary recording studio singer. Ensemble members are selected by audition from college choir members who have completed three quarters of MUSIC 105 or MUSC 109. May be repeated for a maximum of 9 credits. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor (audition) by entry code. Students registered in MUSC 205 must be concurrently enrolled in MUSC 200 unless waived by the department.

MUSC 206 BC Jazz Band • 3 Cr.

Offers performance opportunities for instrumentalists within the Stage Band instrumentation who have completed three quarters of MUSIC 106. The ensemble focuses on jazz improvisation, performance, and interpretation of Big Band jazz literature. Students audition for available chairs. May be repeated for a maximum of 9 credits. Prerequisite: May enroll in MUSC 206 after 3 quarters (9 credits) in MUSC 106.

MUSC 210 Second-Year Theory I • 5 Cr.

Fourth in a six-quarter sequence in Music Theory. Topics include diatonic materials, basic chromatic chords, analysis, composition, sight singing, and ear training. Prerequisite: MUSC 112 or permission of instructor.

MUSC 211 Second-Year Theory II • 5 Cr.

Fifth in a six-quarter sequence in Music Theory. Topics include advanced chromatic chords, advanced modulation, analysis, composition, sight singing, and ear training. Prerequisite: MUSC 210 or permission of instructor.

MUSC 212 Second-Year Theory III • 5 Cr.

Last in a six-quarter sequence in Music Theory. Topics include 20th-century techniques, analysis, composition, sight singing, and ear training. Prerequisite: MUSC 211 or permission of instructor.

MUSC 240 Second-Year Private Instruction I • 1 Cr.

Provides one-on-one instruction on a variety of instruments or voice from beginning to advanced levels. Instruction must be provided by an approved teacher with at least one 30 minute lesson per week. Students pay cost of lesson. May be repeated for a maximum of 3 credits in three quarters. Prerequisite: Three quarters of MUSC 140 or MUSC 143 and permission of program chair

MUSC 243 Second-Year Private Instruction II • 2 Cr.

Provides one-on-one instruction on a variety of instruments or voice from beginning to advanced levels. Instruction must be provided by an approved teacher with at least one 30 minute lesson per week. Students pay cost of lesson. May be repeated for a maximum of 4 credits. Prerequisite: Three quarters of MUSC 140 or MUSC 143 or permission of program chair.

MUSC 299 Individual Projects in Music • V1-3 Cr.

Allows individual study and special projects in music under an instructor's supervision. Requires at least 5 hours of consultation with instructor, and a summary paper, performance, or presentation. Credit levels vary with the nature of the project. May be repeated for a maximum of 12 credits. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.

NAC 096 Nursing Assistant • V1-7 Cr.

This non-credit course prepares students for certification as a Nursing Assistant Certified (NAC). The course meets all requirements for lecture, laboratory and clinical components for Nursing Assistant certification. Prerequisite: Permission of Instructor. Previously NURS 010. Either NURS 010 or NAC 096 may be taken for credit, but not both.

NAC 106 Nursing Assistant Foundations • 4 Cr.

Prepares students to discuss legal and ethical aspects of the Nursing Assistant Certified role. Provides opportunity to understand basic care needs of adults, appropriate communication, and safety and infection control. Prerequisite: permission of instructor. Previously HPRO 116. Either HPRO 116 or NAC 106 may be taken for credit, but not both.

NAC 107 Nursing Assistant Technical Skills • 3 Cr.

Focuses on the daily care needs for adults including communication, safety and infection control. Provides opportunity to practice responses to emergency situations such as falls, non-responsive patient or a power outage. Prepares students for certification exam. Prerequisite: permission of instructor. Recommended: placement by assessment into ENGL& 101. Previously HPRO 117. Either HPRO 117 or NAC 107 may be taken for credit, but not both.

NAC 108 Nursing Assistant Practicum • 3 Cr.

This class focuses on basic daily care and communication techniques to support adults, their families and healthcare teams. The use of correct safety and infection controls, reporting of assessment data, and principles of restorative and rehabilitative care are developed. This course prepares students for the certification exam. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor and NAC 107. May be concurrently enrolled in NAC 107. Recommended: Current CPR card, submit a complete Immunization Status form for BC healthcare students, WA state background check, and ability to safely lift 50 lbs. Previously HPRO 118. Either HPRO 118 or NAC 108 may be taken for credit, but not both.

NDT 100 Biomedical Electronics • 2 Cr.

Introduction to the field of EEG and its use in medicine and surgery. Emphasizes: instrumentation, principles of conversion between analog and digital signals, localization techniques for bipolar and referential montage, and the purpose of bipolar and referential montage. Technical principles in actual operation of a laboratory are introduced in the classroom and applied in the clinical area of EEG. Prerequisite: Acceptance into program. Previously ENDT 100. Either ENDT 100 or NDT 100 may be taken for credit, but not both.

NDT 101 Introduction to EEG • 6 Cr.

Introduction to the field of EEG and its use in medicine and surgery. Emphasizes: patient hook-up, history taking, and handling of patients. Technical principles in actual operation of a laboratory are introduced in the classroom and applied in the clinical area of EEG. Prerequisite: Acceptance into program. Previously ENDT 101. Either ENDT 101 or NDT 101 may be taken for credit, but not both.

NDT 102 Applied Neurophysiology • 5 Cr.

Advanced neuroanatomy of the central nervous system. Identifies the role of the brainstem in controlling body functions and maintaining equilibrium. Includes functions of the musculoskeletal system. Analyzes the nervous control of cardiac muscles, including the autonomic nervous system. Prerequisite: Acceptance into program. Previously ENDT 102. Either ENDT 102 or NDT 102 may be taken for credit, but not both.

NDT 103 Intermediate EEG • 3 Cr.

Expand knowledge in the field of EEG and its use in medicine and surgery. Emphasizes recognizing normal and abnormal EEGs, including epilepsy, diffuse encephalopathy, and focal brain lesions. Technical principles in actual operation of a laboratory are introduced in the classroom and applied in the clinical area of EEG. Prerequisite: NDT 101. Previously ENDT 103. Either ENDT 103 or NDT 103 may be taken for credit, but not both.

NDT 104 Clinical Correlates I • 3 Cr.

Explores the clinical correlates for EEG, recognizing diseases and syndromes related to EEG, and how they relate to the EEG recording. Previously ENDT 104. Either ENDT 104 or NDT 104 may be taken for credit, but not both.

NDT 105 Advanced EEG • 3 Cr.

Broaden knowledge of EEG findings in neurological diseases. Emphasizes: assessing and analyzing brain death, neonates, organic brain syndromes and dementias, medication effects and the EEG, and bedside recording. Prerequisite: NDT 103. Previously ENDT 105. Either ENDT 105 or NDT 105 may be taken for credit, but not both.

NDT 106 Applied Evoked Potential • 4 Cr.

Introduction to the fundamentals of evoked potential, including sensory pathways, digital instrumentation, obligate wave forms, and technical reporting. Previously ENDT 106. Either ENDT 106 or NDT 106 may be taken for credit, but not both.

NDT 120 Intermediate EEG Skills • 3 Cr.

Continuing study of the field of EEG and its use in medicine and surgery. Emphasizes: patient hook-up, history taking, and handling of patients. Technical principles in actual operation of a laboratory are introduced in the classroom and applied in the clinical area of EEG. Previously ENDT 120. Either ENDT 120 or NDT 120 may be taken for credit, but not both.

NDT 121 Advanced EEG Skills • 2 Cr.

Broadens knowledge of EEG findings in neurological diseases. Emphasizes: assessing and analyzing brain death, neonates, organic brain syndromes and dementias, medication effects and the EEG, and bedside recording. Prerequisite: NDT 120. Previously ENDT 121. Either ENDT 121 or NDT 121 may be taken for credit, but not both.

NDT 130 EEG Clinical I • 4 Cr.

Performance of clinical EEG along with recognizing and understanding the test result displayed. Previously ENDT 130. Either ENDT 130 or NDT 130 may be taken for credit, but not both.

NDT 131 EEG Clinical II • 4 Cr.

Performance of clinical EEG and evoked potential along with recognizing and understanding the test result displayed. Prerequisite: NDT 130. Previously ENDT 131. Either ENDT 131 or NDT 131 may be taken for credit, but not both.

NDT 132 EEG Clinical III • 5 Cr.

Performance of clinical EEG and evoked potential along with recognizing and understanding the test result displayed. Prerequisite: NDT 131. Previously ENDT 132. Either ENDT 132 or NDT 132 may be taken for credit, but not both.

NDT 200 Clinical Correlates II • 3 Cr.

Explores the clinical correlates for evoked potential, long-term epilepsy monitoring, nerve conduction velocity and intraoperative monitoring, including indications for intraoperative neurophysiological changes and intraoperative monitoring. Classifies pharmacological agents according to their use in the surgical environment. Analyzes the effects of anesthetic agents. Prerequisite: NDT 104. Previously ENDT 200. Either ENDT 200 or NDT 200 may be taken for credit, but not both.

NDT 201 NDT Theory I • 3 Cr.

Introduce other neurodiagnostic recordings used in the neurological area. Emphasizes: polysomnography (sleep disorders) and long-term epilepsy monitoring. Prerequisite: NDT 105 and 121 with a C or better. Previously ENDT 201. Either ENDT 201 or NDT 201 may be taken for credit, but not both.

NDT 202 NDT Theory II • 3 Cr.

Introduce other neurodiagnostic recordings used in the neurological area. Emphasizes: nerve conduction velocity testing and intraoperative monitoring. Prerequisite: NDT 201. Previously ENDT 202. Either ENDT 202 or NDT 202 may be taken for credit, but not both.

NDT 203 NDT Registry Review • 1 Cr.

Comprehensive review of theory pertaining to EEG and evoked potential in preparation for the national exams. Reviews resumes, job-seeking skills, and practice skills for employment. Prerequisite: NDT 201. Previously ENDT 203. Either ENDT 203 or NDT 203 may be taken for credit, but not both.

NDT 220 NDT Skills I • 2 Cr.

An introduction to other neurodiagnostic recordings used in the neurological area. Emphasis will be placed on polysomnography (sleep disorders) and long-term epilepsy monitoring. Prerequisite: NDT 105 and 121 with a C or better. Previously ENDT 220. Either ENDT 220 or NDT 220 may be taken for credit, but not both.

NDT 221 NDT Skills II • 2 Cr.

Introduce other neurodiagnostic recordings used in the neurological area. Emphasizes: intraoperative monitoring and nerve conduction velocity. Prerequisite: NDT 220. Previously ENDT 221. Either ENDT 221 or NDT 221 may be taken for credit, but not both.

NDT 230 NDT Clinical I • 4 Cr.

Performance of EEG and evoked potential with minimal supervision. Observe polysomnography and long-term epilepsy monitoring. Previously ENDT 230. Either ENDT 230 or NDT 230 may be taken for credit, but not both.

NDT 231 NDT Clinical II • 4 Cr.

Performance of EEG and evoked potential with minimal supervision. Observe intraoperative monitoring and nerve conduction velocity testing. Prerequisite: NDT 230. Previously ENDT 231. Either ENDT 231 or NDT 231 may be taken for credit, but not both.

NDT 232 NDT Clinical III • 12 Cr.

Performance of EEG, evoked potential, polysomnography, intraoperative, nerve conduction studies, and long-term epilepsy monitoring, all within the clinical setting with minimal supervision. Prerequisite: NDT 231. Previously ENDT 232. Either ENDT 232 or NDT 232 may be taken for credit, but not both.

NDT 350 EKG Dysrhythmias • 5 Cr.

This course covers standard EKG placement, cardiovascular anatomy, and physiology, methods of EKG interpretation, and differentiation of normal and abnormal rhythms. Students will learn to recognize sinus, atrial, junctional, and ventricular dysrhythmias. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.

NDT 351 Nerve Conduction Studies • 5 Cr.

This course covers the use of nerve conduction studies to assess peripheral nervous system damage. After covering electrical safety standards and application of electrodes, students will learn to perform several different nerve conduction studies; to correlate patient histories with current symptoms to determine the appropriate study, and to differentiate between normal and abnormal waveforms. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.

NDT 352 Polysomnography Studies • 5 Cr.

This course covers polysomnography from initial patient contact through the study and follow-up. Students will be exposed to proper polysomnography instrumentation and recording techniques, technical specifications, and scoring methods. Students will learn to perform all of the discrete tests administered during an overnight sleep study. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.

NDT 353 Evoked Potential Studies • 5 Cr.

Students will learn to test the integrity of the central nervous system through administering a series of sensory stimulus exams. Students will be exposed to methods for assessing the visual, auditory, and somatosensory pathways. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.

NDT 450 Intraoperative Monitoring • 5 Cr.

Intraoperative neurophysiological monitoring or intraoperative neuromonitoring is the use of electrophysiological methods such as electroencephalography, electromyography, and evoked potentials to monitor the functional integrity of certain neural structures during surgery. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.

NDT 451 Long Term Epilepsy Monitoring • 5 Cr.

Students will learn to conduct a long-term epilepsy monitoring study, beginning with appropriate electrode placement for specific patient needs. Instrumentation for long-term monitoring, preparation of data sheets for seizure tracking, and assessment of results will be covered. Patient safety will be emphasized. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.

NDT 452 Quantitative and Continuous EEG • 5 Cr.

Quantitative Electroencephalography (QEEG) is the field concerned with the numerical analysis of electroencephalography data and associated behavioral correlates. Continuous EEG (CEEG) monitoring allows uninterrupted assessment of cerebral cortical activity with good spatial resolution and excellent temporal resolution. This procedure provides a means of constantly assessing brain function in critically ill obtunded and comatose patients. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.

NDT 453 Functional MRI and Magnetic Encephalography • 5 Cr.

In this advanced course, students will explore the various applications for performing fMRI and/or MEG; include perceptual and cognitive brain processes, localizing regions affected by pathology before surgical removal, determining the function of various parts of the brain, and neurofeedback. Students will learn to differentiate between the physiologic information from the EEG and the anatomical information in the MRI. Instrumentation and patient safety will be emphasized. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.

NDT 454 Pediatric EEG Monitoring • 5 Cr.

In this advanced course, students will learn the theory and practice of pediatric EEG monitoring. They will learn to assess signs and symptoms for pediatric diseases and disorders; students will also develop skills for recognizing childhood seizure manifestations and classification and other abnormal childhood EEG patterns. The course will cover current medications and their effect on EEG activity. Other therapeutic modalities; mechanical, pharmacological, and surgical will be explored. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.

NMTEC 190 Introduction to Nuclear Medicine Technology • 2 Cr.

This course introduces the student to the Bellevue College Nuclear Medicine Technology program. It includes three days of clinical orientation in a nuclear medicine department. We'll create a shared understanding of the basics of nuclear medicine practice, examine active learning techniques, and develop cohesiveness as a group. Prerequisite: Acceptance to the NMTEC program or permission of instructor.

NMTEC 200 Applied Anatomy & Physiology • 1 Cr.

Studies human anatomy and physiology as they apply to nuclear medicine imaging. Specific organ systems covered include skeletal, circulatory, cardiac, pulmonary, gastrointestinal, immune, excretory, endocrine, and central nervous systems. Prerequisite: Acceptance into program.

NMTEC 201 Basic Nuclear Medicine Science • 3 Cr.

Presents basic science required for nuclear medicine. Topics include types of radiation, half-life and radioactive decay, interactions of radiation, detection instruments, statistics of radiation counting, basic radiation protection, and introduction to imaging process. Prerequisite: Acceptance into program.

NMTEC 202 Instrumentation • 2 Cr.

Examines the function and use of the nuclear medicine gamma camera. Topics include basic electronics, collimators, digital cameras, on-line correction systems, and modifications required for tomographic studies. Students learn quality control and troubleshooting. Prerequisite: Acceptance into program.

NMTEC 203 Computers in Nuclear Medicine • 3 Cr.

Introduces the use of computers in nuclear medicine, emphasizing analysis of static, dynamic, and tomographic images. Prerequisite: Acceptance into program.

NMTEC 210 Radiopharmacy • 1 Cr.

Studies all commonly used nuclear medicine pharmaceuticals, their preparation, indications for use, dosages, and contraindications. Prerequisite: Acceptance into program.

NMTEC 211 Patient Care in Nuclear Medicine • 1 Cr.

Presents nursing procedures relating to nuclear medicine. Topics include patient assessment, oxygen administration, infection control, intravenous drug administration, vasovagal and anaphylactic reactions, basic pharmacology, sedation, medical and legal issues, and electrocardiography. Prerequisite: Acceptance into the program.

NMTEC 212 Positron Emission Tomography • 2 Cr.

Covers all aspects of positron emission tomography (PET), including basic principles, instrumentation, PET/CT imaging and quality control, quantitation of radiopharmaceutical uptake, clinical indications for PET imaging, biochemistry of fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG), clinical aspects of FDG imaging, new PET radiopharmaceuticals, and issues relating to reimbursement for PET scans. Prerequisite: Acceptance into program.

NMTEC 229 Introduction to Clinical Education • 3 Cr.

Provides an introduction to the practice of nuclear medicine with an emphasis on the operation of a gamma camera, basic radiopharmacy and radiation safety principles, and patient care procedures. Prerequisite: Acceptance into the program.

NMTEC 230 Clinical Education I • 10 Cr.

First in a five-course sequence of supervised clinical instruction in nuclear medicine technology. Topics include imaging, patient care, radiopharmacy, camera quality control, and computer analysis. Students are expected to gain proficiency according to defined objectives. Prerequisite: Acceptance into program.

Description starting Summer 2018

First course in a five-course clinical internship sequence. Includes beginner-level skill development and knowledge building in areas that are related to patient care, imaging, computer analysis, instrumentation, quality control, hot lab procedures, and safety practice, under strict supervision of licensed technologists. Focuses are on team participation and on ethical and professional behaviors in the clinic including HIPAA requirements. Prerequisite: Acceptance into program.

NMTEC 231 Clinical Education II • 10 Cr.

Second in a five-course sequence of supervised clinical instruction in nuclear medicine technology. Topics include imaging, patient care,radiopharmacy, camera quality control, and computer analysis. Students are expected to gain proficiency according to defined objectives. Prerequisite: Acceptance into program.

Description starting Summer 2018

Second course in a five-course clinical internship sequence. Enhancement of skills and knowledge at an advanced beginner level in areas related to patient care, imaging, computer analysis, instrumentation, quality control, hot lab procedures, safety practice, and therapy procedures, under moderate supervision of licensed technologists. Focus on development of patient communication skills. Prerequisite: Acceptance into program.

NMTEC 232 Clinical Education III • 12 Cr.

Third in a five-course sequence of supervised clinical instruction in nuclear medicine technology. Topics include imaging, patient care, radiopharmacy, camera quality control, and computer analysis. Students are expected to gain proficiency according to defined objectives. Prerequisite: Acceptance into program.

Description starting Summer 2018

Third course in a five-course clinical internship sequence. Students work toward functioning independently while working under supervision of licensed technologists. Enhancement of skills and knowledge at an intermediate level in areas related to patient care, imaging, computer analysis, instrumentation, quality control, hot lab procedures, safety practice, and therapy procedures. Focuses are on self-evaluation and refinement of skills and techniques. Prerequisite: Acceptance into program.

NMTEC 233 Clinical Education IV • 13 Cr.

Fourth in a five-course sequence of supervised clinical instruction in nuclear medicine technology. Topics include imaging, patient care, radiopharmacy, camera quality control, and computer analysis. Students are expected to gain proficiency according to defined objectives. Prerequisite: Acceptance into program.

Description starting Summer 2018

Fourth course in a five-course clinical internship sequence. Students work toward independent function under supervision of licensed technologists. Continued advancement of skills in areas related to patient care, imaging, computer analysis, instrumentation, quality control, hot lab procedures, safety practice, and therapy procedures. Focuses are on learning multiple ways of performing procedures and thinking beyond the practices and patient populations of a single facility. Prerequisite: Acceptance into program.

NMTEC 234 Clinical Education V • 13 Cr.

Fifth in a five-course sequence of supervised clinical instruction in nuclear medicine technology. Topics include radiopharmacy, positron emission tomography, nuclear cardiology, and pediatrics. Prerequisite: Acceptance into the program.

Description starting Summer 2018

Final course in a five-course clinical internship sequence. Assignment to multiple sites in specialized areas of Nuclear Medicine including PET/CT, Nuclear Cardiology, radiopharmacy, and a pediatric observational rotation, all under supervision of licensed technologists. Student broadens knowledge and practice beyond general Nuclear Medicine. Focuses are on professional demeanor, independent practice, and preparation to become an entry-level technologist. Prerequisite: Acceptance into program.

NMTEC 240 Radiation Safety • 1 Cr.

Covers principles and practices for radiation safety. Topics include calculation of doses absorbed from procedures, personnel monitoring, handling and disposal of radioactive materials, and licensing of a nuclear medicine department. Prerequisite: Acceptance into program.

NMTEC 241 Radiation Biology • 1 Cr.

Discusses the potentially harmful effects of radiation on humans. Topics include the basic chemistry of radiation interactions in living cells, the effects of extensive radiation exposure, and the potential long-term effects of accumulated radiation damage. Prerequisite: Acceptance into program.

NMTEC 250 Sectional Anatomy for Nuclear Medicine • 3 Cr.

Presents sectional anatomy of the body, including a brief introduction to the following imaging modalities: CT, MRI, angiography, and ultrasound. Main emphasis is on identifying organs of the head, neck, chest, abdomen, and pelvis on CT and MR images. Prerequisite: Acceptance into the program or permission of program chair.

NMTEC 260 Clinical Nuclear Medicine I • 1 Cr.

Presents nuclear medicine from the technologist's standpoint, emphasizing the technical aspects and pitfalls of nuclear medicine procedures. NMTEC 260 lectures are coordinated with NMTEC 200. Prerequisite: Acceptance into program.

NMTEC 261 Clinical Nuclear Medicine II • 1 Cr.

Presents nuclear medicine from the physician's standpoint, emphasizing the diagnosis of disease and ways in which the technologist can assist the physician making a correct diagnosis. Prerequisite: Acceptance into program.

NMTEC 262 Clinical Nuclear Medicine III • 1 Cr.

Discusses advanced topics related to imaging and non-imaging procedures. Topics include hematology and immunology, laboratory techniques in nuclear medicine, Schilling test, H. pylori breath testing, blood volume determination, bone densitometry, radioimmunotherapy, and advanced nuclear neurology. Prerequisite: Acceptance into program.

NMTEC 275 Board Preparation • 1 Cr.

Prepares students for the NMTCB exam by reviewing all aspects of nuclear medicine technology and giving practice tests. Students focus on practical application of the basic science knowledge gained throughout the program. Students also complete a capstone project. Prerequisite: Acceptance into program or permission of instructor.

NMTEC 280 Computed Tomography for Nuclear Medicine • 3 Cr.

Provides didactic instruction in CT scanning, as is pertinent to its application to nuclear medicine procedures. Includes information relevant to production and detection of X-rays in CT, instrumentation and image reconstruction, specific technique applications, patient care and quality control. Prerequisite: acceptance into program or permission of program chair.

NMTEC 299 Independent Study in Nuclear Medicine • V1-12 Cr.

Provides clinical experience in nuclear medicine technology under the direction of a nuclear medicine technologist, a physician, or a researcher. Prerequisite: permission of program chair.

NSCOM 199 Independent Studies-Network Services/Computing • V1-5 Cr.

Covers direct readings, special projects, and independent study by a student. May be repeated for a maximum of 15 credits. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.

NSCOM 201 CISCO Networking I • 5 Cr.

Course provides foundation knowledge in networking. Topics include: network topologies, OSI model, design and documentation, LANs, network media, protocols and routing. Prerequisite: TECH 217 and placement by assessment into ENGL& 101, or completion of ENGL 092 or 093 with a C orbetter.

NSCOM 202 CISCO Networking II • 5 Cr.

Course uses CISCO internetworking hardware to gain hands-on experience in designing and configuring a network. Topics include router components, startup and setup, configuring routers, IOS, TCP/IP addressing, routing protocols, and network troubleshooting. Prerequisite: NSCOM 201 with a C or better. Placement by assessment into ENGL& 101, or completion of ENGL 092 or 093 with a C or better.

NSCOM 203 CISCO Networking III • 5 Cr.

Course uses Cisco internetworking hardware to gain hands-on experience in designing and configuring a local area network (LAN). Topics include OSI model, LAN switching, virtual LANs, LAN design, routing protocols, access control lists, Novell Internetwork Packet Exchange (IPX) and network management. Prerequisite: NSCOM 202 with a C or better and ENGL& 101 with a C or better.

Description starting Summer 2018

Course uses Cisco internetworking hardware to gain hands-on experience in designing and configuring a local area network (LAN). Topics include OSI model, LAN switching, virtual LANs, LAN design, routing protocols, access control lists and network management. Prerequisite: NSCOM 202 with a C or better and ENGL& 101 with a C or better.

NSCOM 204 CISCO Networking IV • 5 Cr.

Course uses Cisco hardware to gain hands-on experience in designing and configuring a wide area network (WAN). Topics include: WAN design, Point-to-Point Protocol (PPP), Integrated Services Digital Network (ISDN), Frame Relay, network management and CCNA exam preparation. Prerequisite: NSCOM 203 with a C or better and ENGL& 101 with a C or better.

Description starting Summer 2018

Course uses Cisco hardware to gain hands-on experience in designing and configuring a wide area network (WAN). Topics include: WAN design, Point-to-Point Protocol (PPP), Quality of Service (QOS), Network Security and Monitoring. Prerequisite: NSCOM 203 with a C or better and ENGL& 101 with a C or better.

NSCOM 220 Implementing Client Operating Systems • 5 Cr.

Course provides students with the knowledge and skills necessary to install and configure a Microsoft Windows Client Operating System on stand-alone computers and on client computers that are part of a workgroup or a domain. Prerequisite: Placement by assessment into ENGL& 101, or completion of ENGL 092 or 093 with a C or better. Recommended: BTS 161.

NSCOM 221 Implementing Server Operating Systems • 5 Cr.

Course provides students with the knowledge and skills necessary to install and configure a Microsoft Windows server operating system for file and print sharing, remote access services, and application server functions such as Terminal Services. This course also examines security features of the Microsoft Windows server operating system. Prerequisite: Placement by assessment into ENGL& 101, or completion of ENGL 092 or 093 with a C or better. Recommended: IT 103, NSCOM 201.

Description starting Summer 2018

Course provides students with the knowledge and skills necessary to install and configure a Microsoft Windows server operating system for storage, virtualization, and high availability. This course also examines security features of the Microsoft Windows server operating system. Prerequisite: Placement by assessment into ENGL& 101, or completion of ENGL 092 or 093 with a C or better. Recommended: IT 103, NSCOM 201.

NSCOM 223 Managing a Network Environment • 5 Cr.

Course provides students with the knowledge and skills necessary to implement, manage and troubleshoot existing network and server environments based on the Microsoft Windows platform. Prerequisite: NSCOM 221 at BC with a C- or better.

NSCOM 227 Implementing Directory Services • 5 Cr.

Course provides the knowledge and skills necessary to install, configure, and administer Microsoft Windows 2000 Active Directory services. Focuses on implementing Group Policy and understanding the Group Policy tasks required to centrally manage users and computers. Topics include: DNS configuration, account administration, domain management, and disaster recovery. Prerequisite: NSCOM 223 at BC with a C- or better.

Description starting Summer 2018

Course provides the knowledge and skills necessary to install, configure, and administer directory services. Focuses on Active Directory, High Availability, federation and access solutions. Topics include: Active Directory, Group Policy and disaster recovery. Prerequisite: NSCOM 223 at BC with a C or better.

NSCOM 231 Introduction to Cloud Architecture and Services • 5 Cr.

This course addresses the principles and concepts of virtualizat ion and cloud Infrastructure technologies. The course is ideal for gaining a broad understanding of the transition from classic data center, to virtualized data center, to the cloud. Prerequisite: TECH 217 with a C or better, and placement by assessment into ENGL& 101, or completion of ENGL 092 or 093 with a C or better.

NSCOM 235 Cloud Infrastructure • 5 Cr.

This course addresses the principles and concepts of Storage as a Service (SAAS) and Infrastructure/Networking as a Service (IAAS/NAAS). Prerequisite: NSCOM 231 with a C or better.

NSCOM 240 Cloud Services • 5 Cr.

This course addresses the principles and concepts of Platform as a Service and Software as a Service. Prerequisite: NSCOM 231 with a C or better.

NSCOM 294 Special Topics-Network Services/Computing System • V1-10 Cr.

Allows specialized or in-depth study of a subject related to computing technologies and/or information security practices. Topics are announced in the quarterly schedule. May be repeated for a maximum of 15 credits of different topics. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.

NSCOM 295 Special Topics-Network Services/Computing System • V1-10 Cr.

Allows specialized or in-depth study of a subject related to computing technologies and/or information security practices. Topics are announced in the quarterly schedule. May be repeated for a maximum of 15 credits of different topics. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.

NSCOM 296 Special Topics-Network Services/Computing System • V1-10 Cr.

Allows specialized or in-depth study of a subject related to computing technologies and/or information security practices. Topics are announced in the quarterly schedule. May be repeated for a maximum of 15 credits of different topics. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.

NSCOM 297 Special Topics-Network Services/Computing System • V1-10 Cr.

Allows specialized or in-depth study of a subject related to computing technologies and/or information security practices. Topics are announced in the quarterly schedule. May be repeated for a maximum of 15 credits of different topics. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.

NSCOM 299 Independent Studies-Network Services/Computing • V1-10 Cr.

Covers direct readings, special projects, and independent study by a student. May be repeated for a maximum of 15 credits. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.

NURS 022 IV Skills Update • V1-3 Cr.

No class description found.

NURS 026 Venipuncture • 1 Cr.

No class description found.

NURS 027 ACLS PREP • V1-3 Cr.

No class description found.

NURS 029 ACLS • 1 Cr.

No class description found.

NURS 031 PEARS • 0.5 Cr.

No class description found.

NURS 032 Pediatric Adv Life Support Initial Certification • 1 Cr.

No class description found.

NURS 033 Pediatric Adv Life Support Renewal • 1 Cr.

No class description found.

NURS 044 BASIC AIDS EDUCATION • 0.5 Cr.

No class description found.

NURS 057X RN REFRESHER-THEORY • V1-11 Cr.

No class description found.

NURS 057Y RN Refresher Preceptorship • V1-4.4 Cr.

No class description found.

NURS 057Z RN REFRESHER CLINICAL • V1-4.3 Cr.

No class description found.

NURS 058X RN REFRESHER II-THEORY • V1-6 Cr.

No class description found.

NURS 058Z RN REFRESHER II-CLINICAL • V1-9 Cr.

No class description found.

NURS 068 Special Topics • V1-0.5 Cr.

No class description found.

NURS 075X RN REFRESHER COURSE • 5 Cr.

No class description found.

NURS 076X RN REFRESHER THEORY MEDICAL SURGERY • 4 Cr.

No class description found.

NURS 099 Nursing Student Success • 1 Cr.

Designed for first quarter students in the nursing program. Focuses on study and organizational skills, test taking skills and strategies, critical thinking skills, time management, and support to help students succeed in the nursing program.

NURS 100X Foundations of Nursing • 7 Cr.

Provides the framework for nursing theory. Students develop cognitive, psychomotor, assessment, and communicative skills to meet the biophysiological, psychosocial needs of the client. Students discuss relevant concepts in pharmacology and basic human needs and gain clinical experiences in extended-care facilities. Course consists of two components: 100X and 100Z. Prerequisite: Acceptance into program.

NURS 100Y Foundations of Nursing Skills Lab • 2 Cr.

This is the lab portion of Nursing Fundamentals. In this class nursing assessment and other fundamental skills like medication administration are learned prior to students' first hands-on experience with clients. Prerequisite: Admission to program.

NURS 100Z Foundations of Nursing Clinical • 3 Cr.

Clinical component for NURS 100X. Students gain experience in rehabilitation facilities correlating with and implementing nursing theory. Prerequisite: Acceptance into program.

NURS 101X Nursing Care of the Adult Client I • 6 Cr.

The first of three medical/surgical courses focusing on acute and chronic health dysfunctions in the adult client. Students gain clinical experience in acute-care settings. Course consists of two components: 101X and 101Z. Prerequisite: NURS 100X and 100Z.

NURS 101Y Nursing Care of the Adult Client Skills Lab • 1 Cr.

A variety of acute care nursing skills provide baseline competency prior to entry into acute care clinical facilities. Students learn hands-on nursing skills and have the opportunity to practice and perform demonstrations. Prerequisite: N100X, N100Y, N100Z.

NURS 101Z Nursing Care of the Adult Client I Clinical • 5 Cr.

Clinical component for NURS 101X. Students gain experience in health agencies correlating with and implementing nursing theory. Prerequisite: NURS 100X and 100Z.

NURS 102X Nursing Care of the Adult Client II • 6 Cr.

The second of three medical/surgical courses focusing on acute and chronic health dysfunctions. Students gain clinical experience in acute-care settings. Course consists of two components: NURS 102X and 102Z. Prerequisite: NURS 101X and 101Z.

NURS 102Y Nursing Care of the Adult Client II Skills Lab • 1 Cr.

A variety of acute care nursing skills provide baseline competency prior to entry into acute care clinical facilities. Students learn hands-on nursing skills and have the opportunity to practice and perform demonstrations and simulation. Prerequisite: NURS 101X, NURS 101Y, and NURS 101Z.

NURS 102Z Nursing Care of the Adult Client II Clinical • 5 Cr.

Clinical component for NURS 102X. Students gain experience in health agencies correlating with and implementing nursing theory. Prerequisite: NURS 101X and 101Z.

NURS 110X Nursing Fundamentals Theory • 7 Cr.

Introduces relevant theoretical concepts related to fundamentals of nursing practice, such as nursing process, ethical and legal framework for nursing practice, pharmacological principles, biological and sociocultural concepts related to meeting basic needs and health issues across the lifespan. Prerequisite: Acceptance into program.

NURS 110Y Nursing Fundamentals Skills Lab • 2 Cr.

A variety of fundamental nursing skills, including physical assessment, medication administration, and IV therapy provide baseline skills prior to entry into the clinical facilities. Students learn hands-on nursing skills and have the opportunity to practice and perform return demonstrations. Prerequisite: NURS 110Y

NURS 110Z Nursing Fundamentals Clinical • 3 Cr.

Students develop cognitive, psychomotor, assessment, and communicative skills to meet the biological, physiological, and psychosocial needs of the client. Students gain clinical experiences in rehabilitation and extended-care facilities. Prerequisite: NURS 110X and NURS 110Y.

NURS 111X Acute Care Nursing I Theory • 6 Cr.

The first of four medical-surgical courses focusing on acute and chronic health dysfunctions in the adult client. These include nursing and pharmacological management of clients with a variety of medical and surgical diagnosis. Prerequisite: NURS 110X.

NURS 111Y Acute Care Nursing I Skills Lab • 2 Cr.

A variety of acute care nursing skills provide baseline competency prior to entry into acute care clinical facilities. Students learn hands-on nursing skills and have the opportunity to practice and perform demonstrations. Prerequisite: NURS 111X and NURS 110Y.

NURS 111Z Acute Care Nursing I Clinical • 5 Cr.

Clinical component for NURS 111X. Students gain experience in a medical-surgical acute-care facility correlating theory instruction and implementing nursing process. Prerequisite: NURS 110Z and 111Y.

NURS 112X Acute Care Nursing II Theory • 2 Cr.

The second of four medical-surgical courses focusing on acute and chronic health dysfunctions in the adult client. These include nursing and pharmacological management of clients with a variety of medical and surgical diagnosis. Prerequisite: NURS 111X.

NURS 113X Acute Care Nursing III Theory • 4 Cr.

"The third of four medical-surgical courses focusing on acute and chronic health dysfunctions in the adult client. These include nursing and pharmacological management of clients with a variety of medical and surgical diagnosis. Prerequisite: NURS 110X, 111X, and 112X. "

NURS 113Z Acute Care Nursing III Clinical • 5 Cr.

Clinical component for NURS 113X. Students gain experience in a medical-surgical acute-care facility correlating theory instruction and implementing nursing process. Prerequisite: NURS 113X and NURS 111Z.

NURS 114X Gerontology Nursing • 1 Cr.

This course covers the biological, psychosocial, cultural, and environmental challenges associated with aging and the geriatric client. Awareness of these changes and challenges assists the student to effectively plan, negotiate, and implement client-specific strategies of care. Prerequisite: NURS 113X.

NURS 120 Nursing Fundamentals • 6 Cr.

The Nursing Fundamentals course provides students with foundational concepts related to nursing practice. This course introduces essential principles of health and wellness, medical terminology, med-math, health assessment, and the nursing process. Formerly known as NURS 100X. Prerequisite: Admission into the Associate Degree Nursing Program.

NURS 121 Nursing Fundamentals Clinical • 6 Cr.

In this course fundamental concepts and principles of nursing practice are reinforced, and students apply these in laboratory, clinical settings and simulated situations. Course graded credit/no credit. Formerly NURS 100Y and 100Z. Prerequisite: Admission into the Associate Degree Nursing Program.

Description starting Summer 2018

In this course fundamental concepts and principles of nursing practice are reinforced, and students apply these in laboratory, clinical settings and simulated situations. Course graded credit/no credit. Formerly NURS 100Y and 100Z. Prerequisite: Admission into the Associate Degree Nursing Program. Grading: Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory.

NURS 122 Nursing Care of the Adult Client I • 6 Cr.

This is the first of two courses applying nursing theory; quality and safety; and evidence based care concepts to individual, adult clients. Professional interactions and teamwork are emphasized. Formerly known as NURS 101X. Prerequisites: NURS 120 with a grade of C or better, and NURS 121 with credit.

NURS 123 Nursing Care of the Adult Client I Clinical • 6 Cr.

This course is the clinical component of NURS 122. Students implement the nursing process of assessment, planning, intervention, and evaluation for adult medical-surgical patients. They apply nursing theory, identify physiological changes in these patients, and develop a professional nursing identity. Course graded credit/no credit. Formerly NURS 101Y and 101Z. Prerequisites: NURS 120 with a grade of C or better, and NURS 121 with credit.

Description starting Summer 2018

This course is the clinical component of NURS 122. Students implement the nursing process of assessment, planning, intervention, and evaluation for adult medical-surgical patients. They apply nursing theory, identify physiological changes in these patients, and develop a professional nursing identity. Course graded credit/no credit. Formerly NURS 101Y and 101Z. Prerequisites: NURS 120 with a grade of C or better, and NURS 121 with credit. Grading: Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory.

NURS 124 Nursing Care of the Adult Client II • 6 Cr.

This is the second of two courses applying nursing theory; quality and safety; and evidence-based care concepts to adult clients with acute and chronic health dysfunctions. Developing professional interactions are emphasized. Formerly NURS 102X. Prerequisites: NURS 122 with a grade of C or better, and NURS 123 with credit.

NURS 125 Nursing Care of the Adult Client II Clinical • 6 Cr.

This course is the clinical component of NURS 124. The students gain experience in medical-surgical settings applying nursing theory and quality and safety concepts to clients with acute and chronic health dysfunctions. Students also further develop a professional nurse identity. Course graded credit/no credit. Formerly NURS 102Y & NURS 102Z. Prerequisites: NURS 122 with a grade of C or better, and NURS 123 with credit.

Description starting Summer 2018

This course is the clinical component of NURS 124. The students gain experience in medical-surgical settings applying nursing theory and quality and safety concepts to clients with acute and chronic health dysfunctions. Students also further develop a professional nurse identity. Formerly NURS 102Y & NURS 102Z. Prerequisites: NURS 122 with a grade of C or better, and NURS 123 with credit. Grading: Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory.

NURS 198 Independent Study Clinical • V1-6 Cr.

This is an independent study course where students can engage in clinical experiences to meet learning outcomes that have been determined by student and instructor. Prerequisite: Permission of Associate Dean of Nursing.

NURS 199 Independent Lab • 1 Cr.

This is an independent nursing lab class where students can review and practice nursing skills learned in the nursing program. Prerequisite: Admission to the nursing program.

NURS 217X Gerontology Nursing • 3 Cr.

This course explores the process of aging. Physiological, psychological, sociocultural, ethical, and legal aspects of aging are examined within the context of the family and society. A focus will be on promoting healthy aging. Use of evidence based research findings and assessment tools will be utilized in the course. Prerequisite: Admission to the program or permission of Associate Dean of Nursing.

NURS 220Y Maternal and Child Health Nursing Skills Lab • 1 Cr.

A variety of maternity and pediatric acute care nursing skills provide baseline competency prior to entry into the maternity and pediatric care clinical facilities. Students learn hands-on nursing skills and have the opportunity to practice and perform demonstrations and simulation. Prerequisite: NURS 221Z.

NURS 221X Behavioral Health Nursing • 6 Cr.

Focuses on the nurse's therapeutic role in maintaining and enhancing mental health. Students learn to meet the needs of clients with challenged emotional and/or cognitive abilities that impair their day-to-day functioning. Prerequisite: NURS 102X and 102Z.

NURS 221Z Behavioral Health Clinical • 3 Cr.

Provides experience in acute inpatient psychiatric facilities and various community-based mental health programs. Students practice the nursing process in providing client-centered care. Prerequisite: NURS 102X and 102Z.

NURS 222X Transition to Professional Nursing Practice • 6 Cr.

The final course in medical/surgical nursing. Students integrate nursing theory from all previous courses while providing comprehensive nursing care to clients with complex health problems. There is also a focus on care of the older adult. Prerequisite: NURS 221X and 221Z.

NURS 222Z Transition to Professional Nursing Practice Clin • 6 Cr.

Provides clinical experience in advanced medical/surgical nursing. Topics include nursing organizations, legal and ethical considerations in nursing and professional licensing. Community-based experience with the older population is also included. Prerequisite: NURS 221X and 221Z.

Description starting Summer 2018

Provides clinical experience in advanced medical/surgical nursing. Topics include nursing organizations, legal and ethical considerations in nursing and professional licensing. Community-based experience with the older population is also included. Prerequisite: NURS 221X and 221Z. Grading: Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory.

NURS 230X Mental Health Nursing Theory • 6 Cr.

Focuses on the nurse?s therapeutic role in maintaining and enhancing mental health. Students learn to meet the needs of clients with challenged emotional and/or cognitive abilities that impair their day-to-day functioning. Prerequisite: NURS 114X and NURS 113Z.

NURS 230Z Mental Health Nursing Clinical • 4 Cr.

Clinical component for NURS 230X. Students gain experience in a mental health acute care and outpatient facilities, correlating theory instruction and implementing nursing process. Prerequisite: NURS 114X and NURS 113Z.

NURS 231X Pediatric Nursing Theory • 4 Cr.

Focuses on the normal growth and development of the child from birth through adolescence. Students learn principles of care of the ill child focusing on adaptation and health maintenance. Prerequisite: Admission to program.

NURS 231Y Pediatric Nursing Skills Lab • 1 Cr.

A variety of acute-care pediatric nursing skills provide baseline competency prior-entry into acute-care pedicatric clinical facilities. Students learn hands-on pediatric nursing skills and have the opportunity to practice and perform return demonstrations. Prerequisite: Admission to program.

NURS 231Z Pediatric Nursing Clinical • 3 Cr.

Includes community-based clinical observation as well as in-hospital experience in delivery of care of ill children and their families. Prerequisite: Admission to program.

NURS 233X Maternal/Newborn Nursing Theory • 3 Cr.

This course focuses on women?s health promotion and maintenance and family-centered nursing care of the maternal and newborn populations. Students learn how to promote health maintenance, provide preventive care, and manage complications through the antepartum, intrapartum and postpartum periods of childbirth. Prerequisite: Admission to program.

NURS 233Z Maternal/Newborn Nursing Clinical • 1 Cr.

This course focuses on clinical observations, as well as in-hospital experience in labor/delivery, mother/baby care, and the care of pregnant mother and newborn. Prerequisite: Admission to program.

NURS 234X Professional Role Transitions Theory • 6 Cr.

This is the final course in medical/surgical nursing. Students integrate nursing theory from all previous courses while providing comprehensive nursing care to clients with complex health problems. Prerequisite: NURS 233X and NURS 233Z.

NURS 234Y Professional Role Transitions Skills Lab • 1 Cr.

Students maintain competency of all nursing skills previously learned and have the opportunity to practice and perform return demonstrations. Variety of clinical simulations performed using a high velocity simulation mannequin. Prerequisite: NURS 230Z, 231Z and 233Z.

NURS 234Z Professional Role Transitions Clinical • 6 Cr.

Provides clinical experience in advanced medical-surgical nursing in a variety of acute care facilities. Prerequisite: NURS 234X.

NURS 252 Nursing Care of the Behavioral Health Client • 3 Cr.

Focuses on the nurse's therapeutic role in maintaining and enhancing behavioral health. Students learn to meet the needs of clients with challenged emotional and/or cognitive abilities that impair their day-to-day functioning. Formerly NURS 221X. Prerequisites: NURS 124 with a grade of C or better, and NURS 125 with credit.

NURS 253 Behavioral Health Clinical • 2 Cr.

Provides experience in acute inpatient psychiatric facilities and various community-based mental health programs. Students practice the nursing process in providing client-centered care. Course graded credit/no credit. Formerly NURS 221Z. Prerequisites: NURS 124 with a grade of C or better, and NURS 125 with credit.

Description starting Summer 2018

Provides experience in acute inpatient psychiatric facilities and various community-based mental health programs. Students practice the nursing process in providing client-centered care. Formerly NURS 221Z. Prerequisites: NURS 124 with a grade of C or better, and NURS 125 with credit. Grading: Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory.

NURS 254 Nursing Care of the Pediatric Client • 4 Cr.

This course focuses on the nurse's role of health promotion in the pediatric patient and family emphasizing expected growth trends and overall assessment data. Differences in adult and pediatric nursing are highlighted to promote safety and minimize risk. Opportunities for reflective practice, clinical reasoning development, and collaborative teamwork are integrated into learning activities. Formerly NURS 231X. Prerequisites: NURS 252 with a grade of C or better, and NURS 253 with credit.

NURS 255 Nusring Care of the Pediatric Client Clinical • 5 Cr.

This course provides students the opportunity to engage in health promotion of the pediatric patient and family. Students apply developmental theory and principles of pediatric safety to deliver family-centered care. Students also gain confidence in articulating nursing priorities and developing clinical reasoning and reflective practice in the care of pediatric patients. Course grade credit/no credit. Formerly NURS 231Y and 231Z. Prerequisites: NURS 252 with a grade C or better, and NURS 253 with credit.

Description starting Summer 2018

This course provides students the opportunity to engage in health promotion of the pediatric patient and family. Students apply developmental theory and principles of pediatric safety to deliver family-centered care. Students also gain confidence in articulating nursing priorities and developing clinical reasoning and reflective practice in the care of pediatric patients. Formerly NURS 231Y and 231Z. Prerequisites: NURS 252 with a grade C or better, and NURS 253 with credit. Grading: Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory.

NURS 256 Nursing Care of the Maternal Client • 2 Cr.

This course focuses on the nurse's role in the care of the maternal patient and family and highlights the normal physiological and emotional changes related to pregnancy. The nursing process is implemented and evaluated in the context of overall assessment data. Opportunities for reflective practice, clinical reasoning development, and collaboration are integrated into learning activities. Formerly NURS 233X. Prerequisites: NURS 252 with a grade of C or better, and NURS 253 with credit.

NURS 257 Nusring Care of the Maternal Client Clinical • 1 Cr.

This course provides students the opportunity to engage in health promotion of the pregnant mother and newborn. Students gain confidence in articulating nursing priorities, developing clinical reasoning, and continuing reflective practice. This course focuses on clinical observations, as well as in-hospital experience in labor/delivery and mother/baby care. Course graded credit/no credit. Formerly NURS 233Z. Prerequisites: NURS 252 with a grade of C or better, and NURS 253 with credit.

Description starting Summer 2018

This course provides students the opportunity to engage in health promotion of the pregnant mother and newborn. Students gain confidence in articulating nursing priorities, developing clinical reasoning, and continuing reflective practice. This course focuses on clinical observations, as well as in-hospital experience in labor/delivery and mother/baby care. Formerly NURS 233Z. Prerequisites: NURS 252 with a grade of C or better, and NURS 253 with credit. Grading: Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory.

NURS 260 Transition to Professional Nursing • 3 Cr.

This course assists in the transition from student to the professional nurse and is the final course in medical-surgical nursing. Students incorporate concepts of evidence -based practice, quality improvement, and informatics along with previous theory and competencies lea