Bellevue College Annual Security and Fire Safety Report 2018

****This report has been revised and updated as of October 17, 2019.****

 

The Bellevue College (BC) Public Safety Department maintains statistical crime data for the most recent three-year period, including incidents reported to local law enforcement. These statistics also reflect incidents reported to the BC Public Safety Department from off-campus affiliated locations.

The BC crime statistics for the most recent three-year period are listed below. Definitions of each category follow the statistics. The statistics listed below reflect incidents reported to the BC Public Safety Department. Crime statistics for adjacent public property can also be found at the Bellevue Police Department site at: http://www.crimemapping.com/map/wa/Bellevue

 

Your Right to Know

This document is provided in compliance with the federal Jeanne Clery Disclosure of Campus Security Policy and Campus Crime Statistics Act of 1998 (formerly the Crime Awareness and Campus Security Act of 1990).

 

To print or download: Annual Security and Fire Safety Report 2018

 

Clery Offenses
Clery Offense YearOn-CampusOn-Campus Student HousingNon-CampusPublic Property
Manslaughter20180000
20170N/A00
20160N/A00
Negligent Manslaughter20180000
20170N/A00
20160N/A00
Rape20180000
20170N/A00
20160N/A00
Fondling20182100
20172N/A00
20161N/A00
Incest20180000
20170N/A00
20160N/A00
Statutory Rape20180000
20170N/A00
20160N/A00
Robbery20180000
20170N/A00
20160N/A00
Aggravated Assault20181100
20171N/A00
20164N/A00
Burglary20180000
20174N/A00
20160N/A02
Motor Vehicle Theft20187009
20172N/A04
20164N/A04
Arson20180000
20170N/A00
20160N/A00
Liquor Law Arrests20180000
20170N/A00
20162N/A01
Liquor Law Judicial Referrals20182200
20173N/A00
20161N/A00
Drug Law Arrests20181100
20170N/A01
20161N/A01
Drug Law Judicial Referrals201813500
20175N/A00
201610N/A00
Weapons Posessions Arrests20181100
20170N/A00
20160N/A00
Weapons Posessions Judicial Referrals20180000
20170N/A00
20160N/A00
Domestic Violence20181000
20170N/A00
20161N/A01
Dating Violence20182100
20171N/A00
20161N/A00
Stalking201810100
20174N/A00
20166N/A00
Main Campus Clery Hate Crimes 2018
CATEGORIESYEARRACERELIGIONSEXUAL ORIENTATIONGENDERGENDER IDENTITYDISABILITYETHNICITYNATIONAL ORIGIN
MURDER/NON-NEGLIGENT MANSLAUGHTER201800000000
201700000000
201600000000
NEGLIGENT MANSLAUGHTER201800000000
201700000000
201600000000
ROBBERY 201800000000
201700000000
201600000000
AGGRAVATED ASSAULTS201800000000
201700000000
201600000000
BURGLARY201800000000
201700000000
201600000000
MOTOR VEHICLE THEFT201800000000
201700000000
201600000000
ARSON201800000000
201700000000
201600000000
SIMPLE ASSAULTS201800000000
201720000000
201610000000
LARCENY201800000000
201700000000
201600000000
DESTRUCTION/ DAMAGE/ VANDALISM OF PROPERTY201810000011
201700000000
201600000000
RAPE201800000000
201700000000
201600000000
FONDLING 201800000000
201700000000
201600000000
INCEST201800000000
201700000000
201600000000
STATUTORY RAPE201800000000
201700000000
201600000000
MAIN CAMPUS CLERY HATE CRIMES 2018-PUBLIC PROPERTY
CATEGORIESYEARRACERELIGIONSEXUAL ORIENTATIONGENDERGENDER IDENTITYDISABILITYETHNICITYNATIONAL ORIGIN
MURDER/NON-NEGLIGENT MANSLAUGHTER201800000000
201700000000
201600000000
NEGLIGENT MANSLAUGHTER201800000000
201700000000
201600000000
ROBBERY 201800000000
201700000000
201600000000
AGGRAVATED ASSAULTS201800000000
201700000000
201600000000
BURGLARY201800000000
201700000000
201600000000
MOTOR VEHICLE THEFT201800000000
201700000000
201600000000
ARSON201800000000
201700000000
201600000000
SIMPLE ASSAULTS201800000000
201700000000
201600000000
LARCENY201800000000
201700000000
201600000000
INTIMIDATION201800000000
201700000000
201600000000
DESTRUCTION/ DAMAGE/ VANDALISM OF PROPERTY201800000000
201700000000
201600000000
RAPE201800000000
201700000000
20160000000
FONDLING 201800000000
201700000000
201600000000
INCEST201800000000
201700000000
201600000000
STATUTORY RAPE201800000000
201700000000
201600000000
MAIN CAMPUS CLERY HATE CRIMES 2018-NON CAMPUS
CATEGORIESYEARRACERELIGIONSEXUAL ORIENTATIONGENDERGENDER IDENTITYDISABILITYETHNICITYNATIONAL ORIGIN
MURDER/NON-NEGLIGENT MANSLAUGHTER201800000000
201700000000
201600000000
NEGLIGENT MANSLAUGHTER201800000000
201700000000
201600000000
ROBBERY 201800000000
201700000000
201600000000
AGGRAVATED ASSAULTS201800000000
201700000000
201600000000
BURGLARY201800000000
201700000000
201600000000
MOTOR VEHICLE THEFT201800000000
201700000000
201600000000
ARSON201800000000
201700000000
201600000000
SIMPLE ASSAULTS201800000000
201700000000
201600000000
LARCENY201800000000
201700000000
201600000000
INTIMIDATION201800000000
201700000000
201600000000
DESTRUCTION/ DAMAGE/ VANDALISM OF PROPERTY201800000000
201700000000
201600000000
RAPE201800000000
201700000000
201600000000
SODOMY201800000000
201700000000
201600000000
INCEST201800000000
201700000000
201600000000
STATUTORY RAPE201800000000
201700000000
201600000000
North Campus Clery Hate Crimes 2018
CATEGORIESYEARRACERELIGIONSEXUAL ORIENTATIONGENDERGENDER IDENTITYDISABILITYETHNICITYNATIONAL ORIGINTotal
MURDER/NON-NEGLIGENT MANSLAUGHTER2018000000000
2017000000000
2016000000000
NEGLIGENT MANSLAUGHTER2018000000000
2017000000000
2016000000000
ROBBERY 2018000000000
2017000000000
2016000000000
AGGRAVATED ASSAULTS2018000000000
2017000000000
2016000000000
BURGLARY2018000000000
2017000000000
2016000000000
MOTOR VEHICLE THEFT2018000000000
2017000000000
2016000000000
ARSON2018000000000
2017000000000
2016000000000
SIMPLE ASSAULTS2018000000000
2017000000000
2016000000000
LARCENY2018000000000
2017000000000
2016000000000
DESTRUCTION/ DAMAGE/ VANDALISM OF PROPERTY2018000000000
2017000000000
2016000000000
RAPE2018000000000
2017000000000
2016000000000
FONDLING 2018000000000
2017000000000
2016000000000
INCEST2018000000000
2017000000000
2016000000000
STATUTORY RAPE2018000000000
2017000000000
2016000000000
NORTH CAMPUS CLERY HATE CRIMES 2018-PUBLIC PROPERTY
CATEGORIESYEARRACERELIGIONSEXUAL ORIENTATIONGENDERGENDER IDENTITYDISABILITYETHNICITYNATIONAL ORIGINTotal
MURDER/NON-NEGLIGENT MANSLAUGHTER2018000000000
2017000000000
2016000000000
NEGLIGENT MANSLAUGHTER2018000000000
2017000000000
2016000000000
ROBBERY 2018000000000
2017000000000
2016000000000
AGGRAVATED ASSAULTS2018000000000
2017000000000
2016000000000
BURGLARY2018000000000
2017000000000
2016000000000
MOTOR VEHICLE THEFT2018000000000
2017000000000
2016000000000
ARSON2018000000000
2017000000000
2016000000000
SIMPLE ASSAULTS2018000000000
2017000000000
2016000000000
LARCENY2018000000000
2017000000000
2016000000000
INTIMIDATION2018000000000
2017000000000
2016000000000
DESTRUCTION/ DAMAGE/ VANDALISM OF PROPERTY2018000000000
2017000000000
2016000000000
RAPE2018000000000
2017000000000
2016000000000
FONDLING 2018000000000
2017000000000
2016000000000
INCEST2018000000000
2017000000000
2016000000000
STATUTORY RAPE2018000000000
2017000000000
2016000000000

 

Preparation of Annual Crime and Fire Statistics 

The Bellevue College (BC) Public Safety Department prepares the “Annual Security and Fire Report” (ASR) and discloses the annual crime and fire statistics in order to comply with the Clery Act. The crime, arrest, and disciplinary referral statistics for incidents on campus, in non-campus buildings or property, or on public property include those reported to the BC Public Safety Department and other campus officials with responsibility for student and campus activities such as:

  • Associate Vice President for Student Affairs
  • Athletic Department
  • International Education
  • Title IX Office
  • Human Resources
  • Student Programs
  • Student Conduct

 

The Public Safety Department also obtains information from local law enforcement regarding the occurrence of crimes on public property within the campus, on non-campus property or on property immediately adjacent to and accessible from the campus. The Public Safety Department collects all statistics and compiles them in accordance with the Clery Act.

On or before October 1st of each year, a copy of the ASR will be available at the Public Safety Department located in the D-Building room D171 on campus at 3000 Landerholm Circle, Bellevue WA 98007. The ASR will also be available on the college website, the campus intranet, and is e-mailed to all employees.

Safety at BC is a concern for the students, parents, and college employees. BC’s administration recognizes the importance of making the Campus community aware of security on campus and has made this a top priority. Each year, an e-mail notification is sent to all enrolled students, faculty, and staff providing the web-site address to access the Clery Act report. Hard (paper) copies of the report may also be obtained from the BC Public Safety Department (D171) or by calling (425) 564-2400

Bellevue College does not discriminate on the basis of race, color, national origin, sex, disability, or age in its programs and activities. The following has been designated to handle inquiries regarding the non- discrimination policies:

Title IX

Rachel Wellman

425-564-2641 • Office C227

rachel.wellman@bellevuecollege.edu

 

Human Resources

Suzette Yaezenko

425-564-2178 • Office R130

suzette.yaezenko@bellevuecollege.edu

Annual Fire Statistics 

Clery regulations state that facility name(s) and addresses need to be included in the Fire Report. Student housing was not implemented until fall of 2018. Address: 2488 Kelsey Creek Rd SE Bellevue WA 98007.

 

About Bellevue College Public Safety 

The BC Public Safety Department’s well-trained, courteous, and non-commissioned staff provides personal safety, security, crime prevention, preliminary investigations, and other services to the campus community 24 hours per day, 7 days per week. The Public Safety staff is trained and instructed in non-violent crisis intervention skills allowing them to avoid and defuse most confrontational situations. All of the staff is trained in basic CPR and emergency response for major incidents (e.g., Weather Conditions, Earthquake, Medical Emergency, Power Failure, Fire, Evacuation Procedures, Acts of Violence, Hazardous Substances, Bomb Threats, Weapons Use, or Threats).

The BC Public Safety Department acts as the first responder for all criminal incidents, provides general patrol of campus facilities and property, investigates collisions, manages traffic safety and parking, coordinates emergency preparedness planning, and provides crime prevention programs. The department responds to all reports of fire and/or medical aid while working in support of the Bellevue Fire Department (BFD).

The BC Public Safety officers do not have authority to make arrests, but they work closely with federal, state, and local law enforcement agencies. Public Safety Officers have the authority to ask individuals for identification and determine if that person has lawful business on Campus property. The Public Safety Department maintains an extremely professional working relationship with the Bellevue Police Department (BPD), which has jurisdiction on the campus; the majority of criminal incidents are referred to the Bellevue Police Department. All crime victims and witnesses are strongly encouraged to immediately report any crime to the BC Public Safety Department as well as the appropriate law enforcement agency. Prompt reporting will ensure timely warning notices to the campus and timely disclosure of crime statistics.

 

Local Law Enforcement Agencies 

BC has one formal agreement with Bellevue Police Department; a memorandum of understanding is in place regarding crimes related to the Violence Against Women Act. BC Public Safety also has cooperative relationships with BPD, King County Sheriff’s Department, Washington State Patrol, and other law enforcement jurisdictions. The BC Public Safety office works hand-in-hand with agencies such as, but not limited to, Law Enforcement, Fire Department, Investigators, Detectives, Department of Corrections, etc., on arrests, warrants, missing persons, and any other matters where BC can be of assistance.

 

Jurisdiction

BPD has law enforcement jurisdiction on all BC properties and investigates crimes and reported incidents according to their procedures. The King County Sheriff’s Office has secondary law enforcement jurisdiction on all BC properties. As a standard practice, the Sheriff’s Office does not respond to campus property unless needed for emergency assistance and called by BPD, or for self-initiated activity by a King County Sheriff’s Office deputy.

 

Reporting Crimes/Emergencies 

The Bellevue College Campus is relatively safe, with property crimes being the main concern. Community members, students, faculty, staff, and visitors are encouraged to immediately, or in a timely manner, report incidents that may constitute an emergency, a crime, a conduct code violation, or a physical injury. Remember, prompt reporting improves campus safety and security.

To report a crime, emergency, or criminal activity, call the Bellevue College (BC) Public Safety Department at (425) 564-2400 (or ext. 2400 from any campus office telephone) or report directly to the Public Safety Office, Room D171. Bellevue Police non-emergency reporting may be reached at (425) 452-6917. If it is a life threatening emergency, call 911, immediately (NOTE: campus office telephones do NOT need to dial 9 for an outside line for emergency 911 calls, it is only necessary to dial 9-1-1 to reach the emergency dispatcher), then call Public Safety.

Public Safety officers will assist by directing the emergency response vehicles to the location of the emergency. Emergency Call boxes are located throughout the campus and are connected directly to the BC Public Safety Department. In some instances individuals on the campus may choose to file a report with one of the “Campus Security Authorities” in accordance with the Jeanne Clery disclosure of Campus Security Policy and Campus Crime Statistics Act (Clery Act). On BC, “Campus Security Authorities” include, but are not limited to the following:

Campus Security Authority Phone
Steve Robinson- Interim Director of BC Public Safety 425-564-5710
Brenda Ivelisse- Associate Vice President for Student Affairs 425-564-2206
Suzette Yaezenko- Vice President for Human Resources 425-564-2178
Robert Viens- Associate Vice President of Academic Affairs 425-564-3158
Rachel Wellman- Title IX Coordinator 425-564-2641
Dennis Curran- Vice President of Administrative Services 425-564-2446
Gilbert Villalpando- Vice President for Equity & Pluralism 425-564-2300
Jeremy Eggers- Athletics Director 425-564-2193
Marisa Hackett- Director of Disability Resource Center 425-564-2392
Kazumi Hada- Director of International Education 425-564-4068
Alicia Keating Polson- Executive Assistance to the Office of the President 425-564-2302
Jill Powell- Office of Equity and Pluralism425-564-2704
Chad Pettay- Director of Housing 425-564-1702
Megan Kaptik- Student Conduct Officer425-564-2757

Note: “Professional Counselors,” whose official responsibilities include providing mental health counseling, when acting in that capacity for BC within the scope of their license or certificate, are exempt from disclosing information on crimes for inclusion into the annual disclosure of crime statistics. As a matter of policy, counselors are encouraged, if and when they deem it appropriate, to inform persons being counseled of the procedures to report crime on a voluntary basis for inclusion into the annual crime statistics. There are no pastoral counselors on campus. It is important to note that Title IX representatives are not professional counselors and may be required to report certain incidents to law enforcement agencies.

Call the BC Public Safety Department if:

  • Someone is injured or ill
  • You see fire or smell smoke
  • You see anything suspicious or suspicious behavior
  • Someone is hurting another person
  • You see someone stealing
  • You discover something has been stolen or encounter stolen property
  • You see someone forcing entry into a building or vehicle
  • You see anything that may be a safety or hazardous situation

 

Call immediately; do not assume that someone else has called or will call. Provide BC Public Safety Department with accurate, detailed information including your name, the location of the incident/ emergency, the circumstances, the status of the victim(s), and a general description of what happened. Stay on the line until the operator ends the call. Crimes can be reported at any time of the day, seven days a week, and 365 days per year. Reports are confidential within the guidelines established by the General Education Provisions Act, the Campus Security Act, and applicable Washington State laws. Public Safety officers will respond to reports of emergencies, crimes, or criminal activity. Officers will complete an incident report for any crime that occurs on the BC Campus or on BC leased land.

 

Confidentiality & Right to Privacy 

Bellevue College will seek to protect the privacy of the complainant to the fullest extent possible, consistent with the legal obligation to investigate, take appropriate remedial and/or disciplinary action, and comply with the federal law, state law, and Bellevue College’s policies and procedures. Although Bellevue College will attempt to honor complainants’ requests for confidentiality, it cannot guarantee complete confidentiality.

 

Requesting Confidentiality 

If a complainant wants to remain confidential, they must request it in writing to the Title IX Coordinator who will determine whether the College can honor the request. Factors to be weighed during this determination may include, but are not limited to the following:

  • the seriousness of the accusation
  • the age of the complainant
  • whether the sexual violence was perpetrated with a weapon
  • whether the respondent has a history of committing acts of sexual violence or violence or has been the subject of other sexual violence complaints
  • whether the respondent threatened to commit additional acts of sexual violence against the complainant or others
  • whether relevant evidence can be obtained through other means (e.g., security cameras, other witnesses, physical evidence)

 

If the College decides not to conduct an investigation or take disciplinary action because of a request for confidentiality, the Title IX Coordinator will evaluate whether other measures are available to limit the effects of the harassment and prevent its recurrence and implement such measures if reasonably feasible. Maintaining confidentiality may limit the college’s ability to fully respond to the allegations.

Bellevue College will maintain complete publicly available record keeping including Clery Act reporting and disclosures, without the inclusion of personally identifying information about the victim, as defined in section 40002(a)(20) of the Violence Against Women Act of 1994 (42 U.S.C 13925(a)(20)). Bellevue College will also maintain as confidential any accommodations or protective measures provided to the victim, to the extent that maintaining such confidentiality would not impair the ability of the institution to provide the accommodations or protective measures.

Bellevue College encourages anyone who is the victim or witness to any crime to promptly report the incident to the Public Safety. Because Public Safety reports are public records under state law, Bellevue College cannot hold reports of crime in confidence. Anonymous reports to CSAs or Public Safety may be filed for statistical reporting purposes. A student’s privacy concerns are weighed against the needs of the College to respond to certain incidents and crimes.

To the greatest extent possible, all reports will remain private. In compelling situations, Public Safety reserves the right to take reasonable action in response to any crime report, and information may be shared with appropriate departments and agencies under a need to know basis when it pertains to investigative needs and safety concerns of the campus community. All reports submitted on a private or anonymous basis are evaluated for purposes of issuing a campus-wide “timely warning notification” as well as inclusion in the annual crime statistics.

Currently, the only option for confidential reporting on campus is with a licensed professional counselor whose official responsibilities include providing mental health counseling. To speak with a counselor, visit our Counseling Center.

 

Access to Campus Facilities 

Access to Bellevue College (BC) is governed by Bellevue College Policies 6050 (Campus Hours of Operation); 6100 (Facilities Use); and 6130 (After Hours Building Use). As a public agency whose responsibility is to serve the educational needs of students and potential students, it is the policy of Bellevue College to ensure that college services are available and buildings are open to the public during published hours of business (see policy 6100). The college’s public safety department is responsible for the security of the buildings and grounds of the campus.

A building may be opened after hours to accommodate events arranged through Bellevue College events department. These include special approved college functions and prior arranged rentals as per the signed rental agreement. An after-hours building use permit form may be approved for individuals, groups or clubs needing use of Bellevue College facilities when an official rental agreement is not prepared. All after hours building use permit forms must be completed and submitted to Bellevue College public safety director or designee for approval in advance of building use.

The BC Public Safety Department is available on campus 24 hours per day, 7 days per week. At the end of normal business hours, Public Safety Officers will secure all the doors on the campus. During after- hours use, access to all College facilities is by key, code or access card, if issued, or by admittance by Public Safety Officers. Permission/approval for all after hours building use must be submitted to the BC Director of Public Safety in advance of the building use, this includes all facilities management and maintenance use.

Unauthorized access to buildings, rooms, housing or facilities and/or disorderly, disruptive or criminal behavior on campus, or in any college controlled facility, may at a minimum result in the person being removed from the campus. Failure to leave when lawfully requested may result in charges of criminal trespass. If a person served with a prior trespass notice reappears on campus, or if a person is found in a posted facility with no legitimate purpose, they may be subject to immediate arrest.

Any individual or group granted permission to use college facilities shall agree in advance to abide by all college rules and regulations (Policy 6100).

 

Timely Warning

In the event that a situation arises that, in the judgment of the Director of Public Safety, constitutes an ongoing or continuing threat, a campus wide “timely warning” will be issued as soon as practical as required by the Jeanne Clery Disclosure of Campus Security Policy and Campus Crime Statistics Act (Clery Act). A Timely Warning is a notification to the campus community concerning the occurrence of a Clery reportable crime that poses an on-going threat. Timely Warning messages may be sent out regarding arson, burglary, homicide, robbery, aggravated assault, a hate crime, sexual assault or other sexual offenses. Each incident is considered on a case-by-case basis, depending on the facts of the case and the information currently available.

Students, faculty, staff, community members, and guests are encouraged to report all crimes and public safety-related incidents to Bellevue College Public Safety in a timely manner, to aid in providing accurate and timely warning notices to the community when appropriate, and to ensure inclusion in the annual crime statistics. Professional counselors are not obligated to report crimes under the timely warning requirement.

Depending on the circumstances of the crime, especially in situations that could pose an immediate threat to the community and individuals, the Bellevue College (BC) Public Safety Department may employ a variety of different mechanisms to notify the campus (i.e., BC web-site; postings; email; text alert or other methods of communication that may be deemed appropriate.)

Timely warning notifications are written by the Director of Public Safety or their designees. The timely warning content will contain sufficient information about the nature of the threat to allow members of the campus to take protective action, and may include the following:

  • A succinct statement of the incident
  • Possible connection to previous incidents if applicable
  • Date, time, and location of the warning
  • Description and drawing of the suspect, if available
  • Risk reduction and safety tips
  • Other relevant and important information

 

In some cases, Bellevue College may need to keep some facts confidential to avoid compromising an ongoing investigation, and/or to protect the privacy of the individuals involved. Anyone with information warranting a timely warning should report the circumstances to BC Public Safety Department by telephone at (425)-564-2400 or in person at D171.

In the case of a campus emergency an archive of alerts will display below the most recent alert on the webpage. The most recent alert will be emailed to all campus addresses. A RAVE Alert will also be texted to you if you have a registered a mobile number. Further information regarding the RAVE Alert System is available on the Public Safety website.

To report an emergency, dial 9-1-1! You can also contact Public Safety at (425) 564-2400.

 

Emergency Procedures 

The college has established the following procedures to help prevent or minimize injury to BC students, employees, and visitors in the event of a fire, medical emergency, earthquake, or other crises. Students and employees are encouraged to review and learn the steps for each emergency scenario, as well as familiarize themselves with the location of all first-aid stations, manual fire alarm boxes, and fire extinguishers.

Detailed procedures can be found on the Public Safety website: https://www.bellevuecollege.edu/publicsafety under Emergency Procedures or as outlined in Bellevue College policy 6000P.

Emergency maps posted in classrooms, offices and stairwells point out the location of first-aid stations, manual fire alarm boxes, and fire extinguishers, as well as evacuation routes and assembly areas. Employees at college sites other than main campus should call 911 first and the BC Public Safety office second in any potentially life-threatening situation.

Bellevue College has partnered with RAVE Mobile Safety to offer an emergency alert notification system called BC Alerts. The BC Alerts service delivers reliable emergency text and email messages to you anytime there is an emergency on campus that poses a safety concern for the community. Emergencies are considered any event that poses a safety risk to the campus community.

Emergency call boxes are located throughout the campus and are directly connected to the BC Public Safety Department.

FlashAlert – BC (and many other Puget Sound area schools) posts emergency communications on the FlashAlert website. This is the source the media uses to get their closure information and will be BC’s second priority in disseminating emergency messages. You may subscribe to FlashAlert’s email and text message service at http://www.flashalert.net/id/BellevueCollege. Most TV and radio stations broadcast these messages periodically. Please remember, TV and radio stations do not name schools that will be staying open. If BC is not mentioned, assume that classes will meet and offices are open.

BC’s emergency hotline message – Call (425) 401-6680 for emergency information, including campus closure information.

Notification Methods and Procedures  

Upon notification of an incident, a Bellevue College Public Safety officer will confirm the information received. A sergeant, the Assistant Director, the Director of Public Safety or the Vice President of Administrative Services will be advised and determine whether the incident is a significant emergency or dangerous situation involving an immediate threat to the health or safety of students or employees on the campus. A determination will then be made on the appropriate segment(s) of the campus community to receive notification and the appropriate content of such a notification.

BC provides this information using a number of distribution methods. The institution will, without delay, and taking into account the safety of the community, determine the content of the notification and initiate the notification system, unless issuing a notification will, in the professional judgment of responsible authorities, compromise efforts to assist a victim or to contain, respond to, or otherwise mitigate the emergency. It is highly encouraged that departments also use telephone trees to inform staff members of any closure or emergency. The following procedures and notification methods are used for campus closures:

  • On-campus notifications (if a decision to close is made during the day): The President’s Office or the Vice President of Administrative Services sends an e-mail to BC network users. Public Safety will immediately notify instructors and students in classrooms.
  • Off-campus notifications (at all times of the day): The college will make closure information available to people off-campus in the following ways:
    • Rave Alerts (BC’s emergency notification system) – BC will send an e-mail and/or text message as soon as possible when the college closes due to weather or any other emergency. The VP of Administrative Services and/or the Emergency Operations Coordinator or designee will craft the emergency message and send it to the campus community. Sign up for this service here. This system receives the highest priority among several channels the college uses to communicate emergency messages to students, faculty, and staff.
    • FlashAlert – BC (and many other Puget Sound area schools) posts emergency communications on the FlashAlert we This is the source the media uses to get their closure information and will be BC’s second priority in disseminating emergency messages. You may subscribe to FlashAlert’s email and text message service here.

Most TV and radio stations broadcast these messages periodically. Please remember, TV and radio stations do not name schools that will be staying open. If BC is not mentioned, assume that classes will meet and offices are open.

BC’s emergency hotline message – Call (425)401-6680 for emergency information, including campus closure information. Bellevue College will test such emergency response and notification procedures on at least an annual basis. Tests may be announced or unannounced. These emergency response procedures will be documented, for each test, a description of the exercise, the date, and time, whether it was announced or unannounced, and publicized and available upon request.

Power Failure 

In the case of a power failure, do the following:

  • Shut off computers and other sensitive equipment.
  • Contact Public Safety at 425-564-2400 (ext. 2400).
  • If there is no or little natural light in the area, evacuate to an area with natural light or the nearest and/or safest evacuation zone.
  • If there is a fire or other emergency associated with the power failure, follow the appropriate procedures.
  • Public Safety, the Vice President of Administrative Services, and other members of the President’s Cabinet will make a determination on closures or other arrangements for long-term power outages.

 

Fire 

If a fire alarm activates, leave the area immediately and follow the evacuation procedures to the nearest or safest evacuation zone. Remain in the evacuation zone until otherwise directed by Public Safety or Fire Department personnel.

  • Attempt to prevent others from entering the area.
  • Do not use elevators to evacuate. Assist others in need if possible.
  • Avoid locations close to the fire, especially if it is near a gas line.
  • If you suspect or witness a fire near or inside of a building with no alarm sounding:
  • Pull an evacuation alarm pull station for the building. Each building has multiple pull stations, which will activate the evacuation alarm. If the fire is outside and not near a building (bark or bush fire), avoid the area and try to prevent other from entering the area as well.
  • Call 911 and provide them with your location, the location of the fire (building and room), the telephone number you are calling from, and the size/type of the fire (example: large trash can fire or small electrical fire).
  • Call Public Safety at (425)564-2400 or ext. 2400 from a campus phone and provide them with the same information.
  • If you are trained in the use of a fire extinguisher, you may attempt to extinguish the fire. Remember, your safety comes first. If extinguishing the fire puts yourself or others at risk, evacuate the area.
  • Do not re-enter the building until you are authorized to do so by Public Safety or emergency personnel.

 

Earthquake 

What to Do During an Earthquake:

  • Stay calm and stay where you are.
  • If you are indoors, stay indoors.
  • Take shelter under a desk or table, cover your head and neck with one arm, and hold the leg of the desk or table with your other arm.
    • If you cannot move under a desk or table, stand along an inner wall and cover your head and neck with your arms.
    • If you are in a wheelchair or unable to stand along a wall or take shelter, move as close as you can to an inner wall and cover your head and neck with your arms.
    • Move away from windows, glass walls, doors, and unsecured falling hazards.
    • If you are outdoors, stay outdoors.
    • Move away from overhead electric wires, poles, buildings, or anything that may fall.
    • Crouch down, if possible, and cover your head and neck with your arms.
    • Remain in your sheltered area until the shaking stops, then proceed to your nearest or safest evacuation zone.
    • Avoid areas near gas mains.
    • Assist others in need and provide aid if you are qualified to do so.
    • Wait for further instruction before returning to buildings.

 

Medical Emergency 

What to Do in the Case of Injury or Other Medical Emergency:

  • Call 911 if necessary. If not necessary or after dialing 911, call Public Safety at ext. 2400 or 425- 564-2400. State that medical aid is needed and describe:
    • Your location, including the building and room number if you know them;
    • The telephone number from which you are calling;
    • The location of the injured or sick person (if different from your location);
    • The person’s present condition (e.g. bleeding, breathing erratically, unconscious);
    • The nature of the injury or medical problem if the person has been able to tell you what is wrong;
  • If 911 has not been called and Public Safety deems it necessary, an Officer or dispatcher will call for aid. A Public Safety Officer will arrive at the scene as soon as possible.

 

What to Do While Waiting for Help to Arrive:

  • Do not leave the scene or leave the injured person alone
  • Do not move the injured person.
  • Provide first aid if you are qualified to do so.

 

Violent Intruder 

If an armed or threatening intruder comes onto college property it is very important that you report it immediately and take protective actions. When a violent intruder incident occurs, your focus must be your personal safety and the safety of those around you. Remain calm and know your options for protecting yourself in violent intruder situations:

 

  • RUN: Have an escape route/plan in mind; leave belongings and vehicles behind; and keep your hands visible.
  • HIDE: If you cannot run, hide in an area out of the shooter’s view. Block entry to your hiding place, lock doors, and silence your electronic devices. Do not go near windows and close blinds if possible. Stay hidden until help arrives.
    • To lock certain doors on campus, use the key in the red box next to the door.
  • FIGHT: Attempt to incapacitate the intruder; act with physical aggression, and throw items at the intruder. This is a last resort.

Once you are in a safe location, call 911. Do not assume someone else has called. When there is a violent intruder on campus, it is extremely important that you follow the instructions of law enforcement personnel. They are there to help, but their goal is to neutralize the threat. Follow any and all instructions; keep your hands clearly visible; and avoid pointing and yelling.

In the event of an emergency, Bellevue College will, taking into account the safety of the community, determine the content of the notification, and initiate the notification system, unless issuing a notification will, in the professional judgment of responsible authorities, compromise efforts to assist a victim, or to contains, respond to, or otherwise mitigate the emergency.

 

Missing Student Notification 

The College requires that every student who resides in campus housing, regardless of their age, must identify a contact strictly for missing person purposes. That person shall be the first contact person in the event that the student would be officially reported missing during their tenure at the college.

This information will be maintained confidentially, and will only be provided to appropriate authorized campus officials. It will be disclosed to law enforcement personnel in furtherance of a missing person investigation. If any member of the campus community, family member or friend has reason to believe that a resident student’s absence is contrary to their normal behavior, the Public Safety Department shall be notified immediately and will initiate an investigation. A Campus Security Authority may also be notified. However, CSA’s must immediately contact Public Safety if they are notified of a missing person.

The college has 24 hours after receiving the report that the student is missing to initiate specific missing student notification procedures. However, Bellevue College can and may initiate their procedures for a missing student before 24 hours has passed. When the student is under the age of 18 and not emancipated, the institution must notify a custodial parent or guardian within 24 hours of the determination that the student is missing, in addition to notifying any additional contact person designated by the student.

Regardless of whether the student has identified a contact person, is above the age of 18, or is an emancipated minor, Bellevue College will notify local law enforcement agency with jurisdiction in the area within 24 hours of the determination that the student is missing, unless the local law enforcement agency was the entity that made the determination that the student is missing.

Reports of missing persons will be expeditiously investigated. Bellevue College will be the investigative agency when in receipt of a missing person report, unless another law enforcement agency assumes primary responsibility. When possible, a liaison will be established to support the missing student’s family and to assist in the investigation. A person is presumed missing when their absence is inconsistent with their established patterns of behavior and the deviation cannot be readily explained. Before presuming that a person is missing, reasonable measures should be taken to determine that no one familiar with the person has seen or heard from the person for an unusual period of time or is aware of where they may be.  At that point, they need to notify Public Safety at 425-564-2400.

Informing Designated Missing Person Contact or Appropriate Others: After investigating a missing person report, should Bellevue College determine that the student has been missing for 24 hours, Bellevue College will notify:

  • Bellevue Police Department
  • the student’s missing person contact(s)
  • the student’s parent or legal guardian (if the person is under the age of 18 and is not an emancipated individual)

 

Alcohol & Drug Policies 

Possession or consumption of alcoholic beverages, except at authorized and properly licensed functions, is prohibited. Bellevue College (BC) Public Safety Department staff may be required for any events serving alcohol. Alcoholic beverages may not be served at student club meetings or events. See BC Policy 6150.Bellevue College employees, students and visitors are required to abide by all federal and state laws, local ordinances, Washington State Board for Community and Technical College policies, and other related state and federal requirements regarding the consumption or possession of alcoholic beverages, controlled substances and illegal drugs.

BC Policy 4500 states: “Bellevue College intends to provide a drug-free, healthful, safe, and secure work and educational environment. Each employee is expected to report to work in an appropriate mental and physical condition to perform his/her assigned duties. Each student is expected to be in an appropriate mental and physical condition to participate fully in the learning process.

The unlawful manufacture, distribution, dispensation, possession, or use of a controlled substance in or on Bellevue College owned or controlled property, or while conducting Bellevue College business, is prohibited. Violation of this policy will be reason for appropriate personnel action, or for mandatory evaluation/treatment for substance abuse. Any personnel actions and student violations will be processed in accordance with state regulations, bargaining unit agreements, student conduct of code, or other appropriate policies of the college. Any disciplinary action for employees or students will be decided on a case-by-case basis depending upon the specific circumstances.

Employees must report any conviction under a criminal drug statute for violations occurring in or on property owned or controlled by Bellevue College or while conducting Bellevue College business. An employee shall report any such conviction to her/his supervisor within five (5) days after the conviction. Bellevue College must report the conviction to the appropriate federal grant/contracting agency within ten (10) days after having received notice that a person employed under a federally-sponsored grant or contract has any drug statute conviction or violation occurring in the workplace.

Bellevue College recognizes drug abuse and/or dependency to be a health, safety, and security problem. Employees needing assistance with problems related to drug or alcohol abuse are encouraged to use the State Employee Advisory Service and/or employee medical insurance plans, as appropriate. Conscientious efforts to seek such help will not jeopardize employment.

The Board of Trustees of Community College District VIII recognizes alcoholism, alcohol abuse, chemical dependency, and other health and related behavioral problems as treatable conditions which repeatedly and continually interfere with an employee’s ability to perform their job. A college employee having these conditions will be given the same consideration and offer of assistance presently extended to employees having other illnesses.

In addition, WAC 132H-126-100 Prohibits the use of Alcohol, Drug and Tobacco except as permitted by law.

  1. Use, possession, manufacture, or distribution of alcoholic beverages or paraphernalia (except as expressly permitted by college policies, and federal, state, and local laws), or public intoxication on college premises or at college-sponsored events. Alcoholic beverages may not, in any circumstance, be used by, possessed by, or distributed to any person not of legal age.
  2. The use, possession, growing, delivery, sale, or being visibly under the influence of marijuana or the psychoactive compounds found in marijuana and intended for human consumption, regardless of form, or the possession of marijuana paraphernalia on college premises or college-sponsored events. While state law permits the recreational use of marijuana, federal law prohibits such use on college premises or in connection with college activities.
  3. The use, possession, production, delivery, sale, or being under the influence of any prescription drug or possession of drug paraphernalia, including anabolic steroids, androgens, or human growth hormones as defined in chapter 69.41 RCW, or any other controlled substance under chapter 69.50 RCW, except as prescribed for a student’s use by a licensed practitioner.
  4. Tobacco, electronic cigarettes and related products. The use of tobacco, electronic cigarettes, and related products is prohibited in any building owned, leased, or operated by the college or in any location where such use is prohibited, including twenty-five feet from entrances, exits, windows that open, and ventilation intakes of any building owned, leased, or operated by the college. Related products include, but are not limited to, cigarettes, pipes, bidi, clove cigarettes, water pipes, hookahs, chewing tobacco, and snuff.

Violations will be treated warning to dismissal from the college and denial of future registration. Students who feel they might have a problem with drug and/or alcohol abuse are encouraged to make an appointment with a counselor in the Counseling Center.  A BC counselor will refer students to the appropriate off-campus resource. Additional resources include the following:

Bellevue College Counseling Center: 

  • Call: 425-564-5747
  • In person: The front desk is located on the second floor of the Student Affairs building (B- Building)
  • Email: askacounselor@bellevuecollege.edu
    • When emailing a counselor, please email only one counselor.
    • Please allow 24-48 hours for a response if email is sent during regular business hours (Monday – Friday 8 a.m. to 5 p.m.).
    • If there is an immediate health-related emergency, please call 9-1-1, Public Safety at 425- 564-2400 or the 24-hour crisis line at 206-461-3222

  External Resources:  

 

Disciplinary Sanctions  

BC enforces disciplinary sanctions in a consistent manner and in accordance with local, state, and federal laws to include the Student Conduct Code. They include, but are not limited to, disciplinary warning, written reprimand, disciplinary probation, suspension, dismissal and “not in good standing” status. Sanctions can also be combined with conditions such as education projects, restitution and professional evaluation.

The Student Conduct Code may be found under the WAC (Washington Administrative Code) WAC 132H-126-110. There you will find definitions, jurisdictions, student standards, procedures and violations of campus policies.  A student can appeal a disciplinary action by filing a written notice of appeal with the conduct review officer within twenty-one days of service of the student conduct officer’s decision. More information about the appeal process is found in WAC 132H-126 :

(1)The following disciplinary sanctions may be imposed upon students found to have violated the student conduct code:

(a) Disciplinary warning. A verbal statement to a student that they are violating or have violated the student conduct code and that continuation of the same or similar behavior may result in more severe discipline.

(b) Written reprimand. Notice in writing that the student has violated one or more terms of the student conduct code and that continuation of the same or similar behavior may result in more severe disciplinary action.

(c) Disciplinary probation. Formal action placing specific conditions and restrictions upon the student’s continued attendance, depending upon the seriousness of the violation, which may include a deferred disciplinary sanction.

(i) Probation may be for a limited period of time or may be for the duration of the student’s attendance at the college.

(ii) If the student subject to a deferred disciplinary sanction is found in violation of any college rule during the time of disciplinary probation, the deferred disciplinary sanction, which may include, but is not limited to, a suspension or a dismissal from the college, shall take effect immediately without further review. Any such sanction shall be in addition to any sanction or conditions arising from the new violation.

(d) Disciplinary suspension. Separation from the college and from the student status for a stated period of time.

(i) There will be no refund of tuition or fees for the quarter in which the action is taken.

(ii) Conditions of suspension may be imposed and will be specified. Except as otherwise specified in the final order, all conditions must be fulfilled before the end of the suspension period. Failure to fulfill all conditions of suspension in a timely manner will extend the suspension period and any conditions, and may result in additional disciplinary sanctions.

(iii) The college may put a conduct hold in place during the suspension period.

(e) Dismissal. The revocation of all rights and privileges of membership in the college community and exclusion from the campus and college-owned or college controlled facilities without any possibility of return. There will be no refund of tuition or fees for the quarter in which the action is taken.

(2) Disciplinary terms and conditions that may be imposed in conjunction with the imposition of a disciplinary sanction include, but are not limited to, the following:

(a) Education. Participation in or successful completion of an educational assignment designed to create an awareness of the student’s misconduct.

(b) Loss of privileges. Denial of specified privileges for a designated period of time.

(c) No contact order. A prohibition of direct or indirect physical, verbal, electronic, and/or written contact with another individual or group.  o (d) Not in good standing. A student found to be “not in good standing” with the college shall be subject to the following restrictions:

(i) Ineligible to hold an office in any student organization recognized by the college or to hold any elected or appointed office of the college.

(ii) Ineligible to represent the college to anyone outside the college community in any way, including representing the college at any official function, or any forms of intercollegiate competition or representation.

(e) Professional evaluation. Referral for drug, alcohol, psychological, or medical evaluation by an appropriately certified or licensed professional.

(i) The student may choose the professional within the scope of practice and with the professional credentials as defined by the college.

(ii) The student will sign all necessary releases to allow the college access to any such evaluation.

(iii) The student’s return to college may be conditioned upon compliance with recommendations set forth in such a professional evaluation. If the evaluation indicates that the student is not capable of functioning within the college community, the student will remain suspended until future evaluation recommends that the student is capable of reentering the college and complying with the rules of conduct.

(f) Residence hall suspension. Separation of the student from a residence hall or halls for a definite period of time, after which the student may be eligible to return. Conditions for re-acceptance may be specified.

(g) Residence hall dismissal. Permanent separation of the student from a residence hall.

(h) Restitution. Reimbursement for damage to or misappropriation of property, or for injury to persons, or for reasonable costs incurred by the college in pursuing an investigation or disciplinary proceeding. This may take the form of monetary reimbursement, appropriate service, or other compensation.

(i) Trespass or restriction. A student may be restricted from any or all college premises and/or college-sponsored activities based on the violation.

(3) More than one of the disciplinary terms and conditions listed above may be imposed for any single violation.

(4) If a student withdraws from the college or fails to re-enroll before completing a disciplinary sanction or condition, the disciplinary sanction or condition must be completed either prior to or upon the student’s re-enrollment, depending on the nature of the sanction, condition, and/or the underlying violation. Completion of disciplinary sanctions and conditions may be considered in petitions for readmission to the college.

 

Preventing and Responding to Domestic Violence, Dating Violence, Sexual Assault, and Stalking

Sexual misconduct includes sexual harassment, sexual intimidation and sexual violence and are violations of the Bellevue College policy. (Student Conduct Code –WAC 132H-126-100)

Bellevue College will provide written notification upon request to students and employees about existing counseling services, health and mental health services, victim advocacy, legal assistance, visa and immigration assistance, and other services available for victims both within the institutions and in the community.

The institution will provide written notification to victims, upon request, for options for, available assistance in, and how to request changes to academic, living, transportation and working situations or protective measures if the victim requests them and if they are reasonably available, regardless of whether the victim chooses to report the crime to Public Safety or local law enforcement.

The following are the definitions of conduct prohibited by the sexual misconduct policy (Policy 1440P):

  • Sexual misconduct. A general term that includes sexual harassment, non-consensual sexual intercourse, non-consensual sexual contact, sexual coercion, and sexual exploitation.
  • Sexual harassment. Unwelcome sexual or gender based conduct, not otherwise protected by law, that is sufficiently severe, persistent, or pervasive as to deny or limit, based on sex or gender, the ability to participate in or benefit from the college’s educational program, alters the terms of employment, or that creates an intimidating, hostile, or offensive environment for other campus community members.
  • Non-consensual sexual intercourse. Any sexual intercourse (anal, oral, or vaginal), however slight, with any object, by a person upon another person, that is without consent and/or by force.
  • Sexual intercourse includes anal or vaginal penetration by a penis, tongue, finger, or object, or oral copulation by mouth to genital contact or genital to mouth contact.
  • Non-consensual sexual contact. Any intentional sexual touching, however slight, with any object, by a person upon another person that is without consent and/or by force. Sexual touching includes any bodily contact with the breasts, groin, mouth, or other bodily orifice of another individual, or any other bodily contact in a sexual manner.
  • Quid Pro Quo Sexual Harassment. Occurs when an individual in a position of real or perceived authority, conditions the receipt of a benefit upon granting of sexual favors.
  • Sexual coercion. Unreasonably pressuring another for sexual contact. When an impacted party makes it clear through words or actions that they do not want to engage in sexual contact, want to stop, or do not want to go past a certain point of sexual interaction, continued pressure beyond that point is presumptively unreasonable and coercive. Other examples of coercion may include using blackmail or extortion or administering drugs and/or alcohol to overcome resistance or gain consent to sexual activity. Sexual contact that is the result of coercion is non-consensual.
  • Sexual exploitation. Taking non consensual or abusive sexual advantage of another for the responding party’s own advantage or benefit, or to benefit or advantage anyone other than the one being exploited, when the behavior does not otherwise constitute one of the other sexual misconduct offenses described herein.
  • Relationship violence. The infliction of physical harm, bodily injury, assault, or the fear of imminent physical harm, bodily injury or assault committed by:
    • The impacted party’s current or former spouse;
    • The impacted party’s current or former cohabitant;
    • A person with whom the impacted party shares a child in common;
    • A person who has been in a romantic or intimate relationship with the impacted party. Whether such a relationship exists will be gauged by the length, type, and frequency of interaction.
  • Intentional and repeated following of another person, which places that person in reasonable fear that the perpetrator intends to injure, intimidate, or harass that person. Stalking also includes instances where the perpetrator knows or reasonably should know that the person is frightened, intimidated, or harassed, even if the perpetrator lacks such an intent.
  • Harming, threatening, intimidating, coercing, or taking adverse action against a person because of their participation in any protected activity such as reporting concerns, filing a report, or participating in an investigation or hearing related to potential discrimination, harassment, or retaliation.

Bellevue College or an officer, employee or agent of the college may not retaliate, intimidate, threaten, coerce, or otherwise discriminate against any individual for exercising their rights or responsibilities under any provision in this section.

By-Stander Intervention Options for Prevention  

Below are some approaches you could consider. This list is by no means exhaustive — you could probably think of others for any given situation.

  • Use your judgment and common sense. The most effective time to act may be later, not on the spot, and you may want to get advice before taking steps.
  • You should not choose a course of action that puts you or anyone else at risk of harm. Know your own limits and “comfort zone”, and use your common sense.
  • Familiarize yourself with the resources on campus to get guidance for yourself or refer people appropriately.

Strategies in the Moment:

  • Name or acknowledge an offense
  • Point to the “elephant in the room”
  • Interrupt the behavior
  • Publicly support an aggrieved person
  • Use body language to show disapproval
  • Use humor (with care)
  • Encourage dialogue
  • Help calm strong feelings
  • Call for help

Strategies after the Fact:

  • Privately support an upset person
  • Talk privately with the inappropriate actor
  • Report the incident, with or without names

 

Risk Reduction   

The term risk reduction refers to approaches that seek to mitigate risk factors that may increase the likelihood of perpetration, victimization or bystander inaction. Risk reduction focuses on helping individuals and communities address the institutional structures or cultural conditions that facilitate SV, DV & stalking to increase safety. Examples of risk reduction may include but are not limited to general crime prevention education, campus escort programs, programs that educate on how to create individual and community safety plans and strategies, and bystander intervention programs that educate the campus on how to recognize and interrupt situations of harm, or implementing a communications system that can notify the entire campus community of immediate threats to security.

Bellevue College community partners, LifeWire and King County Sexual Assault Resource Center, have provided workshops as requested. Additionally, LifeWire provides quarterly prevention lessons in the Health Sciences Department. A curriculum is being developed by LifeWire in conjunction with Title IX directed towards BC’s student athletes. The curriculum covers basic information about sexual assault, domestic violence, bystander intervention, and Title IX rights. Over 90% of BC student athletes attended a training, and the facilitators also delivered a training specifically for coaches.

As part of our Clery requirements, Bellevue offers an online training through Everfi (previously Campus Clarity) called Think About It. BC uses two training modules—Think About It: Community College and Think  About It: Adult Learners (for students over 25 years of age). The Everfi platform was chosen by the Washington State Board of Community and incoming employees are also asked to complete a course through Everfi’s LawRoom as a part of the new employee on-boarding process. The course is called Bridges: Building a Supportive Community. It covers sexual misconduct under Title IX and VAWA. This course is mandatory for all Bellevue College new employees.

 

Standard of Evidence for Disciplinary Proceedings  

Bellevue College utilizes a standard preponderance (it is more likely than not that sexual assault, harassment or another form of sexual misconduct occurred) when reviewing a complaint.

 

Other definitions  

Impacted party: Any employee, student, or visitor of Bellevue College who is directly affected by an alleged violation of this policy. The impacted party is not necessarily the reporting party; witnesses or other third parties may report concerns. In cases involving an allegation of sexual misconduct, the impacted party has rights under Title IX including, but not limited to: the right to be informed of all orders issued in their specific disciplinary case; the right to appeal a disciplinary decision; and the right to be accompanied by an advisor.

Protected class: Individuals who are protected under local, state or federal civil rights laws, as described in Policy 1440.

Responding party: Person(s) who allegedly discriminated against, harassed, or retaliated against another person(s) in violation of Policy 1440.

Resolution: the means by which a report is finally addressed. This may be accomplished through informal or formal processes, including counseling, mediation, or the formal imposition of discipline.

Consent: Knowing, voluntary and clear permission by word or action, to engage in mutually agreed upon sexual activity.

Consent requires knowing, voluntary and clear permission by word or action, to engage in mutually agreed upon sexual activity. Each party has the responsibility to make certain that the other has consented before engaging in the activity. For consent to be valid, there must be, at the time of the act of sexual intercourse or sexual contact, actual words or conduct indicating freely given agreement to have sexual intercourse or sexual contact. A person may be incapable of giving consent by reason of age, threat or intimidation, lack of opportunity to object, disability, drug or alcohol consumption, or other cause.

Sex without consent is sexual assault. 

Consent is:

  • clear affirmation (words, actions) that create mutually understandable permission
  • voluntary
  • given for each sexual act during an encounter and for each encounter

Consent is NOT:

  • silent
  • passive
  • a lack of resistance
  • given while unconscious or incapacitated
  • transferable — you need consent every time

 

Effective consent cannot result from force, or threat of force, coercion, fraud or intimidation. Physical force includes but is not limited to: hitting, kicking, and restraining. Physical force means someone is physically exerting control of another person through violence.  Threatening someone to obtain consent for a sexual act is a violation of this policy. Threats exist where a reasonable person would have been compelled by the words or actions of another to give permission to sexual activity to which he or she otherwise would not have consented. Each party has the responsibility to make certain that the other has consented before engaging in the activity. For consent to be valid, there must be at the time of the act of sexual intercourse or sexual contact actual words or conduct indicating freely given agreement to have sexual intercourse or sexual contact.

A person cannot consent if they are unable to understand what is happening or are disoriented, helpless, asleep or unconscious for any reason, including due to alcohol or other drugs. An individual who engages in sexual activity when the individual knows, or should know, that the other person is physically or mentally incapacitated has engaged in non-consensual conduct. Intoxication is not a defense against allegations that an individual has engaged in non-consensual sexual conduct.

 

Examples of Sexual Harassment Behaviors:

  • Deliberate touching, stroking or repeated brushing against another’s body
  • Repeated requests for a date or for sexual activity
  • Written, verbal, pictorial or nonverbal communications of a sexual nature not related to the work, service or education activity being conducted
  • Pressure or demands for a date or for sexual activity
  • Jokes, offensive comments that are gender-based
  • Unwanted, repeated email
  • Non-consensual sex, sexual activity
  • Attempted or actual sexual violence, including acts involving sexual coercion and incapacitation
  • Non-consensual recording of sexual acts, distribution
  • Relationship violence including emotional, verbal, physical, financial
  • Following someone in person, via a third party, online
  • Sexual innuendos and comments, sexually explicit questions
  • Pervasive displays of pictures, calendars, cartoons, or other materials with sexually explicit or graphic content

Please note:

  • Anyone present who is subjected to the behavior because they can see it, hear it, etc. can bring forward a complaint of unwanted behavior.
  • There is not necessarily a requirement for the person to explicitly say the words “no” or “stop” for it to be made clear that the behavior is unwanted.
  • Intent is not required. A person may not intend to sexually harass another, but still violate the policy because their actions have met the criteria.

 

Sexual Assault 

Bellevue College (BC) is committed to providing an environment conducive to the pursuit of education and knowledge. Conduct constituting a sexual offense, such as rape, assault, forcible fondling or sexual harassment, is not tolerated. College disciplinary action, criminal prosecution and civil suits are all options available to victims of sexual assault. When sexual assault occurs in the workplace, it may result in a variety of disciplinary actions, including, but not limited to, suspension or termination from BC.

In cases involving an alleged sexual offense, including dating violence, domestic violence, sexual assault, and stalking, the complainant and respondent are entitled to the same opportunities to have others present during a disciplinary hearing. Both the complainant and the respondent shall be informed of the outcome of any campus disciplinary proceeding as a result of an alleged incidence of dating violence, domestic violence, sexual assault and/or stalking.

The college will not limit the choice of advisor or presence for either the accuser or the accused in any meeting or institutional disciplinary proceeding; however, the institution may establish restrictions regarding the extent to which the advisor may participate in the proceedings, as long as the restrictions apply equally to both parties.

Both parties will receive simultaneous notification in writing to both the accuser and the accused of:

  • The result of any institutional disciplinary proceeding that arises from an allegation of dating violence, domestic violence, sexual assault or stalking;
  • The institution’s procedures for the accused and the victim to appeal the result of the institutional disciplinary proceeding, if such proceedings are available;
  • Any change to the result;
  • The time when such results become final

The Washington State Criminal Code (RCW 9A) defines rape as engaging in sexual intercourse with another person:

  1. by forcible compulsion; or
  2. when the victim is incapable of consent by reason of being physically helpless or mentally incapacitated (e.g., when the victim has consumed alcohol and/or other drugs, either voluntarily or involuntarily); or
  3. when the victim does not consent to sexual intercourse with the perpetrator and such lack of consent was expressed by the victim’s words or conduct;

 

In some instances, the victim may know the assailant (“acquaintance rape”) and often does not realize the incident meets the legal definition of rape. The definition of sexual assault is not limited to rape and may include other acts as defined in RCW 9A. A sexual assault may involve any unwanted touching with a sexual motivation. Acquaintance rape may fall into any of the following categories: First or second degree rape, Class A felonies punishable under the Washington State Criminal Code by up to life in prison and/or a $50,000 fine; third degree, Class C felony punishable by up to five years in prison and/or a $10,000 fine.

 

Evidence Preservation 

If a crime involving sexual assault, domestic violence, dating violence, or stalking should occur, the victim should take the following actions:

  • Go to a safe place.
  • Call the Bellevue Police then BC Public Safety Department. If the victim requests, the BC Public Safety Department will assist in notification to the local police of the incident
  • The BC Public Safety Department or the police will contact counseling and victim’s advocate services.
  • Contact a friend or family member.
  • Do not shower, bathe, or douche.
  • Do not urinate, if possible.
  • Do not eat, drink liquids, smoke or brush teeth if oral contact took place.
  • Keep the clothes worn during the offense. If clothes are changed, place clothes in paper bag (evidence deteriorates in plastic).
  • Get prompt medical attention.
  • Do not destroy the physical evidence that may be found in the area of the crime. The victim should not clean or straighten until the police have had an opportunity to collect evidence.
  • Tell someone all details remembered about the assault.
  • Write down all details remembered as soon as possible.
  • Conserve any electronic messages.

 

Following an incident, victims are encouraged to make a report to BC Public Safety Department at (425)564-2400 or in D171, the Title 1X office or to contact the local police at (425) 452-6917. Assistance can be provided by Public Safety or other campus authorities in contacting local police to report the incident and/ or obtaining a protective order; or contacting a third party resource if the victim so chooses.

A reporting party may decline to notify such authorities. This action does not obligate prosecution, but it does make legal action possible if the decision to prosecute is made at a later date. The earlier an incident is reported, the easier it is to collect valuable evidence.

Students who may have been the victim of a crime involving sexual assault, domestic violence, dating violence, or stalking are encouraged to make an appointment with a counselor in the Counseling Center. When a student or employee reports to the institution that they have been a victim of dating violence, domestic violence, sexual assault, or stalking, whether the offense happened on or off campus, Bellevue College will provide the student or employee a written explanation of the student’s or employee’s rights and options.

 

Additional resources include the following:

 

Other Resources: 

 

Law Enforcement Agencies:  

 

Disclosures to Alleged Victims of Crimes of Violence or Sex Offenses

Bellevue College will, upon written request, disclose to the alleged victim of a crime of violence or a non- forcible sex offense, the results of any disciplinary hearings conducted by the college against the student who is the alleged perpetrator of the crime or offense. If the alleged victim is deceased as a result of the crime or offense, Bellevue College will provide the results of the disciplinary hearing to the victim’s next of kin, if so requested.

 

Hate Crimes 

A hate crime is an actual criminal offence motivated in whole or in part by the offender’s bias towards the victim’s status based on race, color, religion, ethnic/national origin, gender expression, sex, age, disability or sexual orientation identities. To be classified as a hate crime it must meet two criteria: (1) a crime must occur, such as physical assault, intimidation, or arson, and (2) the crime must be motivated by bias or prejudice. Incidents of this nature are criminal; along with violating college policies, they are illegal and punishable through customary law enforcement channels.

Drug, Liquor, and Weapon Violations 

Drug Law Violations are violations of state and/or local laws relating to the unlawful possession, sale, use, growing, manufacturing, and making of narcotic drugs. The relevant substances include: opium or cocaine and their derivatives (morphine, heroin, codeine); marijuana; synthetic narcotics (Demerol, methadone’s); and dangerous non-narcotic drugs (barbiturates, Benzedrine).

Liquor Law Violations are violations of laws or ordinances prohibiting: the manufacture, sale, transporting, furnishing, possessing of intoxicating liquor; maintaining unlawful drinking places; bootlegging; operating a still; furnishing liquor to a minor or intemperate person; using a vehicle for illegal transportation of liquor; drinking on a train or public conveyance; all attempts to commit any of the aforementioned. (Drunkenness and driving under the influence are not included in this definition.)

Weapon Law Violations are violations of laws or ordinances dealing with weapon offenses, regulatory in nature, such as: manufacturing, sale, or possession of deadly weapons; carrying deadly weapons, concealed or openly; furnishing deadly weapons to minors; aliens possessing deadly weapons; all attempts to commit any of the aforementioned.

 

Other Criminal Definitions:

Burglary is the unlawful entry of a structure to commit a felony or a theft. For reporting purposes, this definition includes: unlawful entry with intent to commit a larceny or a felony; breaking and entering with intent to commit a larceny; housebreaking; safecracking; and all attempts to commit any of the aforementioned.

Motor Vehicle Theft is the theft or attempted theft of a motor vehicle.

Arson is any willful or malicious burning or attempt to burn, with or without intent to defraud, a dwelling house, public building, motor vehicle or aircraft, personal property of another kind.

Larceny is defined as the unlawful taking, carrying, leading, or riding away of property from the possession of constructive possession of another.

Vandalism is willfully or maliciously destroying, injuring, disfiguring, or defacing any public or private property, real or personal, without the consent of the owner or person having custody or control by cutting, tearing, breaking, marking, painting, drawing, covering with filth, or any other such means as may be specified by local law.

Intimidation is to unlawfully place another person in reasonable fear of bodily harm through the use of threatening words and/or other conduct, but without displaying a weapon or subjecting the victim to actual physical attack.

Simple Assault is an unlawful physical attack by one person upon another where neither the offender displays a weapon, nor the victim suffers obvious severe or aggravated bodily injury involving apparent broken bones, loss of teeth, possible internal injury, severe laceration, or loss of consciousness. The Public Safety Department collects and compiles pertinent information to be disclosed to the public from on and off campus sources, those described above as well as law enforcement agencies with concurrent and neighboring jurisdiction for publishing on an annual basis.  Any questions or clarifications regarding the data presented on this web site should be directed to the Bellevue College Public Safety Department, 3000 Landerholm Circle SE Bellevue WA or by sending an e-mail to: publicsafety@bellevuecollege.edu.

 

Sex Offenders  

Federal law, the Campus Sex Crimes Prevention Act, requires institutions of higher education to issue a statement advising the campus community where law enforcement agency information provided by a state concerning registered sex offenders may be obtained. It also requires state law enforcement agencies to provide BC with a list of registered sex offenders who have indicated that they are either enrolled, intend to enroll, carries on a vocation, or is an employee. Nothing in Federal Education Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA) prohibits an educational institution from disclosing information about registered sex offenders. Bellevue College (BC) Public Safety Department maintains a list of registered sex offenders who are attending or have attended BC.

 

Level I 

The vast majority of registered sex offenders are classified as Level 1 offenders. They are considered at low risk to re-offend. These individuals may be first time offenders and they are usually known by their victims. They normally have not exhibited predatory type characteristics and most have successfully participated or are participating in approved treatment programs. Many are first time offenders.

Level I offenders may not be the subject of general public notification. Washington State Law strictly limits public disclosure of all Level I Registered Sex Offender information. Information shall be shared with other law enforcement agencies and, upon request, relevant, necessary and accurate information may be disclosed to any victim or witness to the offense and to any individual community member who lives near the residence where the offender resides, expects to reside, or is regularly found. Level I offenders MAY NOT be the subject of general public notification.

Level II 

Level II offenders have a moderate risk of re-offending. They generally have more than one victim and the abuse may be long-term. These offenders usually groom their victims and may use threats to commit their crimes; they have a higher likelihood of re-offending than the Level 1 offenders. They are considered a higher risk to re-offend, because of the nature of their previous crime(s) and lifestyle (drug and alcohol abuse and other criminal activity). Some have refused to participate or failed to complete approved treatment programs. Typically, these individuals do not appreciate the damage they have done to their victims.

Washington state law prohibits the Public Disclosure of Level II Registered Sex Offenders except under specific criteria. Level II notifications including relevant, necessary and accurate information may be disclosed to public and private schools, child day care centers, family day care providers, businesses and organizations that serve primarily children, women or vulnerable adults, and neighbors and community groups near the residence where the offender resides, expects to reside, or is regularly found. Level II offenders may not be the subject of general public notification.

Level III 

Level III offenders are the greatest risk to the community. Most are predatory, have other violent crime convictions, refused treatment and are known substance abusers. Community notification is the most extensive. Washington state law permits notifications about Level III offenders that include relevant, accurate and necessary information. This information may be disclosed to the public at large.

BC Policy 1600 states: “Pursuant to RCW 4.24.550, Bellevue College is authorized to release relevant and necessary information regarding sex offenders to the public when release of the information is necessary for public protection. This notification shall be in accordance with applicable state law and shall be in such a manner that maintains safety without creating excessive anxiety among students and staff.

The extent of public disclosure of relevant and necessary information shall be directly related to:

  • The level of risk posed by the offender to the community.
  • The locations where the offender resides, expects to reside or is regularly found.
  • The needs of the affected community members for information to enhance their individual and collective safety.

 

Immunity

Public employees and/or public agencies are immune from civil liability for damages for any discretionary decisions or release of relevant and necessary information, unless it is shown that the employee or agency acted with gross negligence or in bad faith (RCW 4.24.550).

 

Procedures

Upon notification from law enforcement that a sexual offender has registered or intends to register, the dean of student services will be informed. All official notifications to the college community shall come from the office of the dean of student services. Requests for additional information will be referred to the appropriate law enforcement agency.

Upon learning of the enrollment/presence of a convicted sexual offender at Bellevue College, the dean of student services will take the following steps:

  • Obtain additional information, as necessary, from law enforcement.
  • Meet with president and/or her staff and review relevant information to assess safety issues posed for currently enrolled students and the Early Learning Family Childcare Center.
  • Meet with the convicted offender to make him or her aware of the notification procedure. Other than the notification procedure, convicted sex offenders will receive the same rights and privacy protections provided to all students.

Notification will correspond with the classification level in the following manner:

  • Level I – Low Risk
    • President’s Staff
    • Deans/ Associate Deans of Instruction and Student Services
    • Director of the Early Learning Family Childcare Center
  • Level II – Medium Risk
    • All Level I notifications
    • Information to college employees via campus ALL BC OFFICIAL email and portal advising there is a Level II Offender enrolled on campus.
  • Level III – High Risk
    • All Level I and Level II notifications
    • “Public Notification: Sex Offender Release” (picture, name and other information provided by the law enforcement agency) posted on various bulletin boards around campus including the Public Safety Office, Early Learning Family Child Care Center, Student Services Building, Bookstore, Cafeteria, Gymnasium, Library, Learning Support Center, Computer Labs, and other areas frequented by students.
    • Notification of all underage students and their parents registered in classes with the offender.
    • All students registered in class with offender.
    • Contact the offender’s instructors.

 

Relationships with other Agencies 

Bellevue College recognizes that laws and rules are necessary for society to function and supports the enforcement of law by governmental agencies and rules by officials of the College. All persons on the campus are subject to these laws and rules at all times. While the College is state property, and Constitutional protections apply, law enforcement officers may enter the campus to conduct business as needed.

Additionally, the officers are invited to patrol the campus to assist Public Safety in deterring crime. Public Safety Officers are expected to render assistance provided such assistance can be given without significantly endangering the officer or others not involved in the crime.

 

Security & Safety Programs 

Presentations 

At Bellevue College (BC), there are a series of programs offered throughout the year to students, faculty and staff that promote safety and security. The programs are offered by BC Public Safety Department and the Bellevue Police Department.

BC Public Safety Department wants to encourage students, faculty, staff and visitors to be aware of their own responsibility for their security and the security of others. Classes are offered per request and as staffing availability can be accommodated. If any department or organization would like to schedule an offered program, contact the Director of Public Safety or (425) 564-2400. Offered programs include, but are not limited to the following:

  • Emergency Preparedness
  • Non-violent Crisis Intervention
  • Introduction to the campus and Public Safety Department
  • Driver Safety

 

Safety Escorts on Campus 

BC Public Safety Department offers an escort program to all students, faculty and staff to and from any location on the campus. Call (425) 564-2400, if you are in need of a Public Safety escort.

 

 

Crime Prevention 

Personal Safety is a shared responsibility. You are encouraged to think and act in ways that increase your personal safety, the safety of your belongings, and the protection of your vehicle. A program in Personal Safety is offered by the Department of Public Safety and can be requested by contacting the Director of Public Safety or (425) 564-2400.

Below are some tips that can help you prepare yourself and your property. This list is not meant to be an all-inclusive list, but merely a list to start you thinking about your personal and property safety and security. For more information go to: http://www.ncpc.org/

Guard Yourself 

  • Be physically and psychologically prepared to defend yourself. By preparing, you will have more options in a confrontation.
  • When walking on campus, especially at night, use well-traveled, open routes to get to your destination. If possible, walk with another person or call BC Public Safety Department at (425) 564-2400 for an escort.
  • Avoid using isolated stairwells.
  • Walk assertively, without daydreaming, and be alert to everything around you. Dress for movement; wear comfortable shoes if possible and do not carry too many bulky packages.
  • At night, never walk alone unless absolutely necessary. Wait in a well-lit place if someone is meeting you. Contact Public Safety Department (425) 564-2400, for an on-campus escort.
  • Have your car keys in your hand before leaving the building. Get into your vehicle quickly and lock your doors, immediately.
    • Caution: If you see someone loitering around your vehicle, leave and call (425) 564-2400 for a Public Safety officer escort before approaching.
  • Be aware of your surroundings and any signs that something is out of place.
  • In the Office: Some employees carry a loud whistle or other noise device to alert nearby colleagues in case of emergency. Lock building doors. Do not prop open outside building doors that are supposed to remain locked.
  • If you are working late, notify BC Public Safety Department so that they can check on you periodically.
  • On the Street: Police advise saying “No” to requests for money from strangers and avoid confrontation by not saying or doing anything to provoke further conversation.
  • If you feel threatened, try to avoid the danger by getting away from it quickly.

 

Get Help 

  • Scream loudly for help, “Call the Police!”
  • From any campus phone, dial ext. 2400 for BC Public Safety Department or dial 911 for the police
  • Dial 911 for police or fire from any public phone

 

Title IX

Prevention and Awareness Programs

In an effort to reduce the risk of sexual misconduct as well as the crimes of rape, sexual assault, sexual harassment, stalking, dating violence, and domestic violence occurring among its students, Bellevue College (BC) utilizes a range of strategies and initiatives to promote awareness, education, risk reduction, and prevention programming. Programs offered throughout the year to students and employees include strong messages regarding not just awareness, but also primary prevention (including information on healthy relationships, environmental management, and bystander intervention), and discuss institutional policies on sexual misconduct as well as the definitions of domestic violence, dating violence, sexual assault, stalking, and consent in reference to sexual activity.

BC offers an online training through Everfi Campus Clarity called Think About It. BC uses two training modules—Think About It: Community College and Think About It: Adult Learners (for students over 25 years of age). Both modules cover sexual harassment, domestic violence, dating violence, stalking, sexual violence, and consent. New employees to BC are also asked to complete a course through Everfi’s LawRoom platform. The course, called Bridges: Building a Supportive Community, covers sexual misconduct under Title IX and VAWA.

BC’s community partner, LifeWire, provides prevention trainings in Health and Wellness classes quarterly. LifeWire has also partnered with BC staff to provide trainings that covered awareness, prevention, bystander intervention, and Title IX rights to all Bellevue athletes and ASG members. In 2018, BC was awarded a federal Campus Program grant from the Office on Violence Against women. As part of the grant, BC convened a Coordinated Community Response Team to build a coordinated, collaborative, and systemic response to the crimes of sexual assault, domestic violence, dating violence, and stalking.

 

How to be an Active Bystander

An active bystander is a person who witnesses a harmful or dangerous situation and chooses to speak up or step in to keep the situation from continuing or escalating. Bystanders play a critical role in the prevention of sexual and relationship violence. We want to promote a culture of respect and accountability where bystanders are actively engaged in the prevention of violence without causing further harm. Below is a list of ways to be an active bystander. If you or someone else is in immediate danger, dial 9-1-1.

  • Watch out for your friends and fellow students/employees. If you see someone who looks like they could be in trouble or need help, ask if they are ok.
  • Confront people who seclude, hit on, try to make out with, or have sex with people who are incapacitated.
  • Speak up when someone discusses plans to take sexual advantage of another person.
  • Believe someone who discloses sexual assault, abusive behavior, or experience with stalking.
  • Refer people to on or off campus resources listed in this document for support in health, counseling, or with legal assistance.

 

Bystander Intervention Strategies (the 3 Ds)

  • DirectDirectly confront the harasser.

Before you decide to respond directly, assess the situation: Are both you and the person being harassed physically safe? Can you tell if the person being harassed would like someone to speak up? If so, you may want to choose a direct response.

  • DistractInterrupt the incident in some way.

Instead of addressing the harasser, engage directly with the person who is being targeted. Don’t talk about or refer to the harassment–talk about something completely unrelated. Ask for the time, complement the person’s shoes, or spill a drink.

  • DelegateAsk someone to assist.

Get help from someone else. Ask a staff member or RA to help.  Ask someone who knows the victim better to intervene. Call Public Safety or another authority. Delegating is particularly profound since it breaks through the diffusion of responsibility that so often happens when there are multiple people around.

 

Risk Reduction

With no intent to victim blame and recognizing that only abusers are responsible for their abuse, the following are some strategies to reduce one’s risk of sexual assault or harassment (taken from Rape, Abuse, and Incest National Network, www.rainn.org)

  • Be aware of your surroundings. Knowing where you are and who is around you may help you to find a way to get out of a bad situation.
  • Try to avoid isolated areas. It is more difficult to get help if no one is around.
  • Walk with purpose. Even if you don’t know where you are going, act like you do.
  • Trust your instincts. If a situation or location feels unsafe or uncomfortable, it probably isn’t the best place to be.
  • Try not to load yourself down with packages or bags as this can make you appear more vulnerable.
  • Make sure your cell phone is with you and charged and that you have cab money.
  • Don’t allow yourself to be isolated with someone you don’t trust or someone you don’t know.
  • Avoid putting music headphones in both ears so that you can be more aware of your surroundings, especially if you are walking alone.
  • When you go to a social gathering, go with a group of friends. Arrive together, check in with each other throughout the evening, and leave together. Knowing where you are and who is around you may help you to find a way out of a bad situation.
  • Trust your instincts. If you feel unsafe in any situation, go with your gut. If you see something suspicious, contact law enforcement immediately (local authorities can be reached by calling 9-1-1 in most areas of the United States).
  • Don’t leave your drink unattended while talking, dancing, using the restroom, or making a phone call. If you’ve left your drink alone, just get a new one.
  • Don’t accept drinks from people you don’t know or trust. If you choose to accept a drink, go with the person to the bar to order it, watch it being poured, and carry it yourself. At parties, don’t drink from the punch bowls or other large, common open containers.
  • Watch out for your friends, and vice versa. If a friend seems out of it, is way too intoxicated for the amount of alcohol they’ve had, or is acting out of character, get them to a safe place immediately.
  • If you suspect you or a friend has been drugged, contact law enforcement immediately (local authorities can be reached by calling 9-1-1 in most areas of the U.S.). Be explicit with doctors so they can give you the correct tests (you will need a urine test and possibly others).

If you need to get out of an uncomfortable or scary situation here are some things that you can try:

  • Remember that being in this situation is not your fault. You did not do anything wrong; it is the person who is making you uncomfortable that is to blame.
  • Be true to yourself. Don’t feel obligated to do anything you don’t want to do. “I don’t want to” is always a good enough reason. Do what feels right to you and what you are comfortable with.
  • Have a code word with your friends or family so that if you don’t feel comfortable you can call them and communicate your discomfort without the person you are with knowing. Your friends or family can then come to get you or make up an excuse for you to leave.
  • If you don’t want to hurt the person’s feelings it is better to lie and make up a reason to leave than to stay and be uncomfortable, scared, or worse. Some excuses you could use are: needing to take care of a friend or family member, not feeling well, having somewhere else that you need to be, etc.
  • Try to think of an escape route. How would you try to get out of the room? Where are the doors? Windows? Are there people around who might be able to help you? Is there an emergency phone nearby? c
  • If you and/or the other person have been drinking, you can say that you would rather wait until you both have your full judgment before doing anything you may regret later.

Community Advocates – LifeWire and KCSARC for Sexual Assault, Domestic Violence, Dating Violence, and Stalking

Bellevue College works closely with local community agencies to support students. Through the Campus Program grant, we have Memorandums of Understanding (MOUs) with program partners LifeWire and King County Sexual Assault Resource Center (KCSARC). As program partners, LifeWire and KCSARC provide guidance, support, and expertise on policy and program development, as well as confidential services to victims of dating and domestic violence and sexual assault.

LifeWire supports domestic violence survivors through advocacy, support groups, legal assistance, housing services, and therapy. You can reach LifeWire’s 24-hour Helpline at 425-746-1940.

KCSARC is a victim-advocacy organization that provides critical support, tools, and direct services to children, teens, women and men who are victims of sexual assault. You can reach KCSARC’s 24-hour resource line at 888-998-6423.

 

Sexual Assault, Domestic Violence, Dating Violence, and Stalking

Bellevue College (BC), through its Student Conduct Code (policy 2050) and the Discrimination, Harassment and Retaliation (policy 1440, updated 10/17/2018) which prohibits dating violence, domestic violence, sexual assault and stalking. Any accommodations or protective measures provided by BC to a victim are protected by FERPA and the College’s policies governing student records, and are therefore maintained as confidential, unless the confidentiality would impair the ability of the College to provide the accommodations or protective measures, or Title IX or Due Process requirements mandate their disclosure. The Public Safety Department maintains a daily Clery log of all incidents that occur on BC property. The log does not include personally identifying information about any victims and is publicly available upon request.

 

Clery Crime Definitions

These definitions are used in the FBI’s Uniform Crime Reporting (UCR) Program for reporting purposes and do not necessarily reflect the policy definitions used by the College in policies 2050 and 1440.

 

Domestic Violence

A felony or misdemeanor crime of violence committed:

(a) by a current or former spouse or intimate partner of the victim;

(b) by a person with whom the victim shares a child in common;

(c) by a person who is cohabitating with or has cohabitated with the victim as a spouse or intimate partner;

(d) by a person similarly situated to a spouse of the victim under the domestic or family violence laws of the jurisdiction in which the crime of violence occurred; or

(e) by any other person against an adult or youth victim who is protected from that person’s act under the domestic or family violence laws of the jurisdiction in which the crime of violence occurred.

 

Dating Violence

Violence committed by a person who is or has been in a social relationship of a romantic or intimate nature with the victim. The existence of such a relationship shall be determined based on the reporting party’s statement with consideration of the length of the relationship, the type of relationship, and the frequency of interaction between the persons involved in the relationship. For the purpose of this definition, (a) dating violence includes sexual or physical abuse or the threat of such abuse. (b) dating violence does not include acts covered under the definition of domestic violence.

 

Stalking

Engaging in a course of conduct directed at a specific person that would cause a reasonable person to (a) fear for his or her safety or the safety of others; or (b) suffer substantial emotional distress.

Sex Offenses

Any sexual act directed against another person, without the consent of the victim, including instances where the victim is incapable of giving consent.

  1. Rape – The penetration, no matter how slight, of the vagina or anus with any body part or object, or oral penetration by a sex organ of another person, without the consent of the victim.
  2. Fondling – The touching of the private body parts of another person for the purpose of sexual gratification, without the consent of the victim, including instances where the victim is incapable of giving consent because of his/her age or because of his/her temporary or permanent mental incapacity.
  3. Incest – Sexual intercourse between persons who are related to each other within the degrees wherein marriage is prohibited by law.
  4. Statutory Rape – Sexual intercourse with a person who is under the statutory age of consent.

Jurisdictional Definitions

These definitions are used in the Washington State Criminal Code – Revised Code of Washington (RCW) and do not necessarily reflect the policy definitions used by the College in policies 2050 and 1440.

 

Consent

Washington Statute 9A.44.010(7): “Consent” means that at the time of the act of sexual intercourse or sexual contact there are actual words or conduct indicating freely given agreement to have sexual intercourse or sexual contact.

 

Domestic & Dating Violence

The Washington State Criminal Code does not contain a separate crime of “domestic violence” or “dating violence.”  Instead, crimes relating to domestic violence and dating violence are covered by other provisions of the criminal code, such as “Sexual Offenses” or “Assault” crimes.  The law is gender neutral and recognizes that domestic violence occurs between members of the same or any sex.

Washington Statute RCW 26.50.010(3): For purposes of criminal law, “domestic violence” means: (a) Physical harm, bodily injury, assault, or the infliction of fear of imminent physical harm, bodily injury or assault, sexual assault, or stalking as defined in RCW 9A.46.110 of one intimate partner by another intimate partner; or (b) physical harm, bodily injury, assault, or the infliction of fear of imminent physical harm, bodily injury or assault, sexual assault, or stalking as defined in RCW 9A.46.110 of one family or household member by another family or household member.

“Family or household members” means spouses, domestic partners, former spouses, former domestic partners, persons who have a child in common regardless of whether they have been married or have lived together at any time, adult persons related by blood or marriage, adult persons who are presently residing together or who have resided together in the past, persons sixteen years of age or older who are presently residing together or who have resided together in the past and who have or have had a dating relationship, persons sixteen years of age or older with whom a person sixteen years of age or older has or has had a dating relationship, and persons who have a biological or legal parent-child relationship, including stepparents and stepchildren and grandparents and grandchildren.

“Dating relationship” means a social relationship of a romantic nature. Factors include: (a) The length of time the relationship has existed; (b) the nature of the relationship; and (c) the frequency of interaction between the parties.

 

Stalking

Washington Statute RCW 9a.46.110: (1) A person commits the crime of stalking if, without lawful authority and under circumstances not amounting to a felony attempt of another crime:

(a) He or she intentionally and repeatedly harasses or repeatedly follows another person; and

(b) The person being harassed or followed is placed in fear that the stalker intends to injure the person, another person, or property of the person or of another person. The feeling of fear must be one that a reasonable person in the same situation would experience under all the circumstances; and

(c) The stalker either:

(i) Intends to frighten, intimidate, or harass the person; or

(ii) Knows or reasonably should know that the person is afraid, intimidated, or harassed even if the stalker did not intend to place the person in fear or intimidate or harass the person.

(2)(a) It is not a defense to the crime of stalking under subsection (1)(c)(i) of this section that the stalker was not given actual notice that the person did not want the stalker to contact or follow the person; and

(b) It is not a defense to the crime of stalking under subsection (1)(c)(ii) of this section that the stalker did not intend to frighten, intimidate, or harass the person.

(3) It shall be a defense to the crime of stalking that the defendant is a licensed private investigator acting within the capacity of his or her license as provided by chapter 18.165 RCW.

(4) Attempts to contact or follow the person after being given actual notice that the person does not want to be contacted or followed constitutes prima facie evidence that the stalker intends to intimidate or harass the person. “Contact” includes, in addition to any other form of contact or communication, the sending of an electronic communication to the person.

(5)(a) Except as provided in (b) of this subsection, a person who stalks another person is guilty of a gross misdemeanor.

(b) A person who stalks another is guilty of a class B felony if any of the following applies: (i) The stalker has previously been convicted in this state or any other state of any crime of harassment, as defined in RCW 9A.46.060, of the same victim or members of the victim’s family or household or any person specifically named in a protective order; (ii) the stalking violates any protective order protecting the person being stalked; (iii) the stalker has previously been convicted of a gross misdemeanor or felony stalking offense under this section for stalking another person; (iv) the stalker was armed with a deadly weapon, as defined in RCW 9.94A.825, while stalking the person; (v)(A) the stalker’s victim is or was a law enforcement officer; judge; juror; attorney; victim advocate; legislator; community corrections’ officer; an employee, contract staff person, or volunteer of a correctional agency; court employee, court clerk, or courthouse facilitator; or an employee of the child protective, child welfare, or adult protective services division within the department of social and health services; and (B) the stalker stalked the victim to retaliate against the victim for an act the victim performed during the course of official duties or to influence the victim’s performance of official duties; or (vi) the stalker’s victim is a current, former, or prospective witness in an adjudicative proceeding, and the stalker stalked the victim to retaliate against the victim as a result of the victim’s testimony or potential testimony.

(6) As used in this section:

(a) “Correctional agency” means a person working for the department of natural resources in a correctional setting or any state, county, or municipally operated agency with the authority to direct the release of a person serving a sentence or term of confinement and includes but is not limited to the department of corrections, the indeterminate sentence review board, and the department of social and health services.

(b) “Follows” means deliberately maintaining visual or physical proximity to a specific person over a period of time. A finding that the alleged stalker repeatedly and deliberately appears at the person’s home, school, place of employment, business, or any other location to maintain visual or physical proximity to the person is sufficient to find that the alleged stalker follows the person. It is not necessary to establish that the alleged stalker follows the person while in transit from one location to another.

(c) “Harasses” means unlawful harassment as defined in RCW 10.14.020.

(d) “Protective order” means any temporary or permanent court order prohibiting or limiting violence against, harassment of, contact or communication with, or physical proximity to another person.

(e) “Repeatedly” means on two or more separate occasions.

 

Bellevue College Policy Definitions

These definitions are used to determine violations of policy and are reflected in College policies: Discrimination, Harassment and Retaliation 1440, 1440(P) and Student Conduct Code 2050 (WAC 132-126-100).

 

Consent

Consent is knowing, voluntary and clear permission by word or action, to engage in mutually agreed upon sexual activity.

  • Effective consent cannot result from force, or threat of force, coercion, fraud or intimidation.
  • Physical force includes but is not limited to: hitting, kicking, and restraining. Physical force means someone is physically exerting control of another person through violence.
  • Threatening someone to obtain consent for a sexual act is a violation of this policy. Threats exist where a reasonable person would have been compelled by the words or actions of another to give permission to sexual activity to which he or she otherwise would not have consented.
  • Each party has the responsibility to make certain that the other has consented before engaging in the activity. For consent to be valid, there must be at the time of the act of sexual intercourse or sexual contact actual words or conduct indicating freely given agreement to have sexual intercourse or sexual contact.
  • A person cannot consent if they are unable to understand what is happening or are disoriented, helpless, asleep or unconscious for any reason, including due to alcohol or other drugs. An individual who engages in sexual activity when the individual knows, or should know, that the other person is physically or mentally incapacitated has engaged in non consensual conduct. Intoxication is not a defense against allegations that an individual has engaged in non consensual sexual conduct.

 

Sexual misconduct

The following definitions are reflected in both College policies 1440 and 2050 (WAC 132-126-100). Sexual misconduct is a general term that includes sexual harassment, non-consensual sexual intercourse, non-consensual sexual contact, sexual coercion, and sexual exploitation.

  • Sexual harassment. Unwelcome sexual or gender based conduct, not otherwise protected by law, that is sufficiently severe, persistent, or pervasive as to deny or limit, based on sex or gender, the ability to participate in or benefit from the college’s educational program, alters the terms of employment, or that creates an intimidating, hostile, or offensive environment for other campus community members.
  • Non consensual sexual intercourse. Any sexual intercourse (anal, oral, or vaginal), however slight, with any object, by a person upon another person, that is without consent and/or by force. Sexual intercourse includes anal or vaginal penetration by a penis, tongue, finger, or object, or oral copulation by mouth to genital contact or genital to mouth contact.
  • Non consensual sexual contact. Any intentional sexual touching, however slight, with any object, by a person upon another person that is without consent and/or by force. Sexual touching includes any bodily contact with the breasts, groin, mouth, or other bodily orifice of another individual, or any other bodily contact in a sexual manner.
  • Quid Pro Quo Sexual Harassment. Occurs when an individual in a position of real or perceived authority, conditions the receipt of a benefit upon granting of sexual favors.
  • Sexual coercion. Unreasonably pressuring another for sexual contact. When an impacted party makes it clear through words or actions that they do not want to engage in sexual contact, want to stop, or do not want to go past a certain point of sexual interaction, continued pressure beyond that point is presumptively unreasonable and coercive. Other examples of coercion may include using blackmail or extortion or administering drugs and/or alcohol to overcome resistance or gain consent to sexual activity. Sexual contact that is the result of coercion is non-consensual.
  • Sexual exploitation. Taking nonconsensual or abusive sexual advantage of another for the responding party’s own advantage or benefit, or to benefit or advantage anyone other than the one being exploited, when the behavior does not otherwise constitute one of the other sexual misconduct offenses described herein.
  • Relationship violence. The infliction of physical harm, bodily injury, assault, or the fear of imminent physical harm, bodily injury or assault committed by
  • The impacted party’s current or former spouse;
  • The impacted party’s current or former cohabitant;
  • A person with whom the impacted party shares a child in common; or
  • A person who has been in a romantic or intimate relationship with the impacted party. Whether such a relationship exists will be gauged by the length, type, and frequency of interaction
  • Intentional and repeated following of another person, which places that person in reasonable fear that the perpetrator intends to injure, intimidate, or harass that person. Stalking also includes instances where the perpetrator knows or reasonably should know that the person is frightened, intimidated, or harassed, even if the perpetrator lacks such an intent

 

Retaliation

Harming, threatening, intimidating, coercing, or taking adverse action against a person because of their participation in any protected activity such as reporting concerns, filing a report, or participating in an investigation or hearing related to potential discrimination, harassment, or retaliation.

 

Procedures if a Crime of Sexual Assault, Domestic Violence, Dating Violence, & Stalking Should Occur

Sexual misconduct is a general term used by Bellevue College that includes policy violations involving such things as sex and gender-based harassment, sexual violence and relationship violence. The College takes these matters seriously and has policies and processes to assist those impacted.

If you are the victim of sexual misconduct, gender-based violence, sexual assault, stalking, relationship violence (dating or domestic violence), the following suggestions may be helpful:

  • Go to a safe place and speak with someone you trust. If there is an imminent threat or if you are in danger, call 911.
  • Contact a victim’s advocate for confidential support and assistance. Two local agencies are LifeWire at https://www.lifewire.org/ or at 800-827-8840 and King County Sexual Assault Resource Center at https://www.kcsarc.org/ or at 888-998-6423. Other local resources can be found at https://www.bellevuecollege.edu/titleix/resources/off-campus/.
  • If you are on campus during regular business hours, you may access BC Counseling Center on the 2nd floor of the B bldg. or at 425-564-5747.
  • For your safety and well-being, immediate medical attention is encouraged. Further, being examined as soon as possible, ideally within 120 hours, is important in the case of rape or sexual assault. The nearest hospital to the College offering SANE (Sexual Assault Nurse Examiner) is Overlake Emergency and Trauma Center, 1035 116th AVE NE, Bellevue. WA 98004, 425-688-5759. Other area hospitals that offer a SANE exam can be found at https://www.seattle.gov/police/need-help/sexual-assault/getting-medical-care.
  • To preserve evidence, it is recommended that you do not bathe, shower, douche, eat, drink, smoke, brush your teeth, urinate, defecate, or change clothes before receiving medical attention. Even if you have already taken any of these actions, you are still encouraged to have prompt medical care, and evidence may still be recoverable.
  • If police are involved or will be involved, they will likely obtain evidence from the scene. It is best to leave things undisturbed until their arrival. They will gather bedding, linens or unlaundered clothing, and any other pertinent articles that may be used for evidence. It is best to allow police to secure items in evidence containers, but if you are involved in transmission of items of evidence, such as to the hospital, secure them in a clean paper bag or clean sheet to avoid contamination.
  • If you have physical injuries, photograph or have them photographed, with a date stamp on the photo. Photograph any changes that occur.
  • Record the names of any witnesses and their contact information. This information may be helpful as proof of a crime, to obtain an order of protection, or to offer proof of a campus policy violation.
  • Document any details (e.g., physical description, names, license plate number, car description, etc.) that you recall. If you have time and the ability, write notes to remind you of details.
  • If you obtain a court order of protection (e.g., domestic violence, anti-harassment, sexual assault protection order), please notify the BC Department of Public Safety or the campus Title IX Coordinator.
  • Contact the Title IX Coordinator or Title IX Assistant Coordinator if you need assistance with College concerns, such as no-contact orders or other protective measures. The Title IX Coordinator or Title IX Assistant Coordinator will also assist to facilitate connections with external advocacy agencies and law enforcement if requested. The College is able to offer reasonable academic supports, changes to living arrangements, transportation resources or modifications, escorts, no contact orders, counseling services access, and other supports and resources as needed by a victim.

 

Reporting Sexual Assault, Domestic Violence, Dating Violence, and Stalking

While employees are required to report to Title IX when they learn an incident has occurred or is impacting someone on campus, students are not required to make such a report. However, the College encourages all members of the campus community who believe they are victim of any crime including domestic violence, dating violence, sexual assault or stalking to immediately report the incident so that resources and support services can be accessed.

The following are reporting options for circumstances where someone is impacted by sexual misconduct, sex or gender-based harassment, relationship violence including dating and domestic violence, stalking, and/or sexual assault.

 

On-Campus Reporting Options

 

Off-Campus Reporting Options

  • Equal Employment Opportunity Commission
    909 First Avenue, Suite 400
    Seattle, WA 98104-1061
    eeoc.gov
  • Washington State Human Rights Commission
    1511 Third Avenue, Suite 921
    Seattle, WA 98101
    hum.wa.gov
  • Office for Civil Rights
    S. Department of Education
    915 Second Avenue
    Seattle, WA 98171-1099
    www.ed.gov

If the assault occurs in the residence hall, the Office of Housing, Student Conduct, and Title IX should be contacted. Immediate reporting to the police is an important factor in successful investigation and prosecution of domestic violence, dating violence, sexual assault and stalking cases. It is the victim’s decision whether they want to file a report with law enforcement. Please see the Mandatory Reporting section for exceptions.

 

Confidential Reporting and Privacy

To make informed choices, all parties should be aware of confidentiality and privacy issues, as well as institutional mandatory reporting requirements.

Bellevue College will seek to protect the privacy of both the impacted and responding parties, consistent with its legal obligation to investigate and take appropriate interim measures and disciplinary actions; and comply with federal law, state law, and college policy. Although the college will attempt to honor a party’s requests for confidentiality as defined below, it cannot be guaranteed. The Title IX coordinator / HR representative will determine how to handle requests for confidentiality.

Confidentiality means information shared cannot be revealed to others without permission of the individual, unless required by law.

  • Confidentiality under this request does not constitute privileged communication. Requests for confidentiality is a request to take no action that would identify the impacted party.
  • In cases where a request for confidentiality is granted, Bellevue College will offer available resources, supports, and remedies. If the College decides that it is obligated to pursue a formal resolution, the impacted party is not obligated to participate in the resolution process. However, the ability of Bellevue College to enforce its policies or provide some remedies may be limited as a result.

Privacy generally means that information related to a report of alleged sexual misconduct will only be shared on a “need to know” bases, in order to provide support for the individual and ensure safety for individuals and the community.

Privileged Communication is confidentiality that is protected by a professional license, (e.g. ordained clergy, mental health counselors and attorneys) unless given expressed permission or required by law.

  • If reporting students wish that details of an incident be kept confidential under privileged communication, they should speak with a Bellevue College mental health counselor. Their service is free of charge. Counselors who are acting in their professional roles as a licensed counselor have no duty to report your information to Bellevue College. Mandatory reporting requirements in accordance with applicable law and standards of licensed professional practice.

 

Mandatory Reporting

All BC employees are required to report child abuse and neglect as described in BC Mandatory Reporting of Child Abuse policy 1470 and RCW 26.44.030. As a result, confidentiality cannot be guaranteed in sexual misconduct incidents involving minors.

 

Disciplinary Action

When BC policies and procedures prohibiting domestic violence, dating violence, sexual assault, stalking and other violations of law occur, the college will pursue disciplinary action. Employee disciplinary procedures will be followed in accordance with established BC policies and procedures, collective bargaining agreements, and relevant rules and laws. Employees could receive discipline up to and including termination.

Student are subject to the Student Conduct Code. The Student Conduct Code outlines disciplinary procedures to ensure that the process is consistent, fair, and impartial. If a student is found responsible for a violation by the preponderance of evidence, disciplinary sanctions may be imposed.  Sanctions may consider a students’ previous conduct history and level of current offense. Sanctions can range from a warning to dismissal from the College. Disciplinary terms and conditions may be imposed in conjunction with a disciplinary sanction including, but not limited to, educational projects, access restrictions, and professional assessments.

Procedures for institutional disciplinary action in cases of alleged domestic violence, dating violence, sexual assault or stalking proceedings shall include prompt, fair and impartial process from the initial complaint to the final result. In all instances, the process will be conducted in a manner that is consistent with the institution’s policy and that is transparent to the Impacted Party and the Responding Party.

Proceedings are conducted by officials who receive annual training on the issues related to domestic violence, dating violence, sexual assault, and stalking, and how to conduct an investigation and/or hearing process that protects the safety of victims and promotes accountability. Annual training received is provided by both internal trainings and external trainings through professional organizations.

The trainings include information pertaining to: institutional policy and procedure; best-practice guidance on Title IX and VAWA regulations; trauma-informed interviews, investigations, and practices; consent in sexual interactions; due process rights of parties; and sanctioning. No victims of domestic violence, dating violence, sexual assault or stalking shall be penalized or retaliated against in any way for their participation in the College’s this process.

 

1440P Discrimination, Harassment, Retaliation (Procedures) Updated in October 2018

It is the policy of Bellevue College to ensure a learning and working environment free from discrimination, harassment, or retaliation based on an individual’s membership in a protected class, and to investigate and resolve alleged violations of this policy in an equitable and timely fashion. These procedures describe how the college will receive, investigate, and resolve reports by students, employees, and visitors who allege violations of Policy 1440 by college employees or students.

 

Who may raise a concern:

Any individual who believes they have:

  • Been discriminated against or harassed based on their membership in a protected class (impacted party) by a member of the college community (responding party) in violation of Policy 1440;
  • Been retaliated against for reporting prohibited conduct or participating in an investigation or disciplinary proceeding related to a violation of Policy 1440; or
  • Witnessed or have knowledge of a violation of Policy 1440 (reporting party).

 

Where to raise a concern:

Reports of gender discrimination, sexual misconduct, or retaliation by a student should be raised with the Title IX office (see the section on Reporting and/or 1440P for contact information). In cases where the impacted party is a student and the responding party is a college employee, the Title IX coordinator will direct the matter to the Office of Human Resources Office (HR). All other reports, including all reports where the impacted party is an employee, should be raised with the HR. If a report is against employees in the Title IX office or HR, it should be submitted to the President’s Office for referral to an alternate designee.

 

How to raise a concern:

Reports may be submitted orally, in writing, or electronically. The college encourages timely reporting of concerns related to Policy 1440. Reports should be made in good faith, with a regard for the truth, and should not contain intentionally dishonest information.

 

Confidentiality

Bellevue College will seek to protect the privacy of both the impacted and responding parties, consistent with its legal obligation to investigate and take appropriate interim measures and disciplinary actions; and comply with federal law, state law, and college policy. Although the college will attempt to honor a party’s requests for confidentiality, it cannot be guaranteed. The Title IX coordinator / HR representative will determine how to handle requests for confidentiality.

 

Informal resolution

Under appropriate circumstances and if the impacted and responding parties agree, they may voluntarily pursue informal resolution during the investigation of a concern. Informal resolution is not appropriate when the allegations involve a mandatory reporting situation or a threat to the college community.

If an informal resolution is appropriate, the impacted party and the responding party may explore remedies or resolution through:

  • Guided conversations or communications conducted by the Title IX coordinator / HR representative or a mutually agreed upon third party;
  • Structured resolution process conducted by a trained mediator; or
  • Voluntarily agreed on alterations to either or both of the parties’ work or class schedules or student housing arrangements.

If the parties agree to an informal resolution process, the college will endeavor to begin the process within ten (10) business days after the parties agree to this option and conclude within thirty (30) business days of beginning that process. The informal process is voluntary. Either the impacted or responding party may withdraw from the informal resolution process at any time, at which point the formal investigation process will resume. If the impacted and responding party voluntarily resolve a report, the college will record the terms of the resolution in a written agreement signed by both parties and provide written notice to both parties that the report has been closed.

 

Investigation process

Upon receiving a report, the college will begin a prompt and equitable investigation. Investigations will be overseen by either the Title IX coordinator or HR representative, depending on the nature of the report, and will be conducted by trained college employees or qualified outside investigators. The Title IX coordinator/HR representative will provide the impacted party and responding party with written notification if the investigation will be conducted by a designee or outside investigator, including the designee’s or outside investigator’s contact information.

The college will endeavor to complete the investigation process within ninety (90) days. If the college anticipates that the investigation will exceed this time frame, it will notify the impacted party and the responding party and provide an explanation for the delay and reasonable estimated date of completion.

 

Timelines

Unless otherwise indicated, all time frames in these procedures are intended as guidelines that the college will make a good faith effort to meet whenever reasonably possible. Additional time may be necessary to address, among other things, college breaks and holidays; scheduling conflicts; the need to coordinate with law enforcement, other government agencies and institutions, or an external investigator; or the need to conduct additional investigation or to pursue an informal resolution process.

 

Interim measures

At any point during an investigation, the Title IX coordinator/HR representative, in collaboration with the student conduct office, public safety, and/or a supervisor or appropriate college official, may impose or revise interim measures to protect the impacted party and/or responding party pending resolution of the report. Interim measures may include, but are not limited to, imposition of no contact directives, class rescheduling, temporary work reassignments, referrals for counseling or medical assistance, reassignment of housing, and imposition of summary suspension or administrative leave on the responding party consistent with the college’s student conduct code, employment policies, and collective bargaining agreements.

 

Initial meeting

Within five (5) business days after receiving a report, the Title IX coordinator/HR representative will endeavor to contact the impacted party to schedule an initial meeting. At this time, the impacted party will be informed that they are entitled to be accompanied by an advisor of their choice (support person) during the investigation process. The Title IX coordinator/HR representative will endeavor to hold the initial meeting within ten (10) business days after receipt of the report.

During the initial meeting, the Title IX coordinator/HR representative will:

  • Interview the impacted party about the incident described in the report;
  • Provide copies of Policy 1440/1440P, as well as written information regarding on-campus and off-campus support services and resources;
  • Discuss confidentiality;
  • Identify and discuss possible interim measures; and
  • When appropriate, identify and discuss options for resolving the report.

Based on the initial meeting, the Title IX coordinator/HR representative will determine

  • Whether the report involves allegations of discrimination, harassment, or retaliation prohibited under Policy 1440 or whether the matter should be referred to the college’s general complaint resolution procedures (1450P), student dispute resolution procedures (1450P2) or the student conduct code (Policy 2050);
  • What, if any, interim measures should be imposed on behalf of the impacted and responding parties pending resolution of the report;
  • Who will conduct the investigation; and
  • Areas in which additional investigation may be necessary.

 

Responding party interview

The Title IX coordinator/HR representative will endeavor to provide the responding party written notice of the report within ten (10) business days following the initial meeting and schedule an interview with the investigator to discuss the allegations. The investigator will endeavor to conduct the responding party interview within (10) business days after the college provides the responding party with notice of the report.

The written notice to the responding party will include:

  • Identities of the parties involved in the alleged incident;
  • Date and location of the incident causing concern;
  • Description of the alleged conduct and the alleged policy violation;
  • Name and contact information for the individual assigned to conduct the investigation if available;
  • Proposed date, time, and location for conducting an interview; and
  • Notice that the responding party may attend the interview with a support person of their choice, including the responding party’s bargaining unit representative if they are a represented employee.

During the responding party interview, the investigator will:

  • Interview the responding party about the allegations in the report;
  • Provide copies of Policy 1440/1440P, as well as written information regarding on-campus and off-campus support services and resources;
  • Identify and discuss possible interim measures; and
  • When appropriate, identify and discuss options for resolving the report.

 

Additional investigation

At any point during this process, the Title IX Coordinator or HR Representative, their designees, or an outside investigator may interview relevant witnesses and/or gather and review documentation related to a report.

 

Findings

The investigation will culminate in a written report that contains the investigator’s findings of fact, including a summary of relevant inculpatory and exculpatory evidence. When the investigation is performed by a designee or an outside investigator, these findings will be forwarded to the Title IX coordinator/HR representative for review. In all cases, the Title IX coordinator/HR representative will provide the impacted and responding parties notice of the investigative findings.

In cases involving allegations of sexual violence, the Title IX coordinator/HR representative will provide the impacted party and the responding party with a copy of the investigation report to the extent permissible under FERPA and other state and federal confidentiality laws. In sexual misconduct cases in which the responding party is an employee, either the impacted or responding party may file a written notice of reconsideration of the investigative findings if it is within seven (7) days of receiving notice of the findings.

In sexual misconduct cases in which the responding party is a student, the Title IX coordinator/HR representative will forward the following to the Student Conduct Officer

  • A copy of the final investigative report; and
  • A confidential memorandum that summarizes the findings and makes recommendations on discipline and/or corrective action, if appropriate.

The impacted party and the responding party may appeal the disciplinary decision of the Student Conduct Officer as described in the student conduct code (Policy 2050).

 

Disciplinary action

Disciplinary action will be in accordance with college policy and collective bargaining agreements. Reasonable efforts will be made to initiate disciplinary action within fifteen (15) business days of the supervisor, appropriate college official, or student conduct officer receiving the findings and/or recommendations.

 

Withdrawal

At any point during the investigation, an impacted party may seek to withdraw their report. Depending on the circumstances, the college may proceed with an investigation even after the impacted party has withdrawn the report or it will provide written notice to both parties that the report has been withdrawn and that the case is closed.

 

Administrative closure

If the impacted party does not fully cooperate with the investigator during the investigation, the Title IX coordinator or the HR representative may provide the impacted party with written notice that the investigation will be closed in seven (7) business days unless the impacted party contacts the investigator within that time frame and provides sufficient assurance of future cooperation.

 

Access within the resolution process

Individuals requiring accommodations to participate in these processes should contact the HR (employees) or the Disability Resource Center (students). Individuals requiring interpretation or translation services should contact the HR.

 

Using work time to participate in the resolution process

Employees will be given reasonable release time from their regular work schedules to participate in these procedures, following notification to appropriate administrative personnel or supervisors.

 

Disposition of records

Records and other evidence related to a report will be retained and maintained in compliance with the public records act, public records retention requirements, as well as any other applicable state and federal laws and regulations.

 

Resolution through an external agency

Individuals may submit allegations of discrimination, harassment, or retaliation based on membership in a protected class with the following state or federal agencies within the time periods prescribed by those agencies.

  • Equal Employment Opportunity Commission
    909 First Avenue, Suite 400
    Seattle, WA 98104-1061
    eeoc.gov
  • Washington State Human Rights Commission
    1511 Third Avenue, Suite 921
    Seattle, WA 98101
    hum.wa.gov
  • Office for Civil Rights
    S. Department of Education
    915 Second Avenue
    Seattle, WA 98171-1099
    www.ed.gov

 

Fire Safety Report and Statistics

The Campus Fire Safety Right to Know Act is an amendment to the Higher Education Opportunity Act. This addition is in place to increase campus fire safety awareness nationwide by providing prospective students, students and their families with fire safety records of post-secondary institutions with residential facilities. Since it was signed into law on August 14, 2008, post-secondary institutions are required to publish fire safety information and statistics for their residential facilities.

In addition, the Federal government requires all eligible Title IV institutions that maintain on campus student housing facilities to publish an annual fire safety report that contains information about campus fire safety practices and standards of the institution. The data includes the number, cause, related injuries and deaths, and the property damages associated with each fire, and to report this to the Department of Education on an annual basis. The information in this section provides the campus community and prospective and current students, staff, faculty and visitors information regarding the policies, concerns, and fire safety conditions that are present at Bellevue College.

The log is kept and maintained by the Director of Housing and data is compiled annually for inclusion in the Annual Security and Fire Safety Report. Real-time records of the log are available for review in the Bellevue College Housing Office or by contacting housing@bellevuecollege.edu.

 

Housing Policies and Regulations

Upon signing a housing contract, students agree to abide by on-campus polices and regulations. Included in these regulations are restrictions on portable electric appliances, a smoking policy, a policy against the misuse of fire safety equipment, and evacuation procedures and requirements. These policies are explained in the Bellevue College Housing Community Standards as well as during move-in orientation and are enforced by Housing staff 24-hours per day.

 

Prohibited Items

Residents and their guests may not possess candles, incense, electric skillets, hot plates/pads, space heaters, personal refrigerators in excess of 4.5 cubic feet, barbecue grills of any kind, flammable gas or oils, or motorized vehicles inside the Bellevue College Residence Hall.

 

Smoking

The Bellevue College Residence Hall is a smoke free community. The use of tobacco, electronic cigarettes, and related products is prohibited, including twenty-five (25) feet from entrances, exits, windows that open, and ventilation intakes of any building owned, leased, or operated by the College.

 

Misuse of Fire Safety Equipment

Tampering with, disarming, or falsely discharging any provided fire safety equipment, including smoke detectors, fire extinguishers, sprinklers, or alarms is strictly prohibited.

 

Evacuation Requirements

Failure to evacuate in case of a fire alarm or other mandated evacuation in a prompt and orderly manner is strictly prohibited. Residents and guests may not block or barricade any route of evacuation including doors and windows.

 

Fire Safety Education and Training Programs

The College takes fire safety seriously and has established fire safety programs for students living in the Residence Hall. Bellevue College has specific fire safety programs that target employees and contractors working on campus such as CPR training, fire extinguisher training, and first aid. Fire Safety Training programs can also be requested by contacting Public Safety at (425) 564-2400.

Fire safety education and response is promoted on an ongoing basis. Resident Assistants (RAs) and housing staff receive orientation to the operations of the fire alarm system, alarm panel, pull-stations, smoke alarms, and fire extinguishers. Students living in the Residence Hall receive a general orientation to the fire systems present in the building during the first week of their arrival. Staff and RAs also review evacuation and emergency procedures with residents. Planned fire drills are announced in advance.

 

Student Fire Safety Education

Residents are strongly encouraged when receiving their housing orientation to become familiar with regular and emergency exits of their buildings. During the orientation and throughout their interactions with staff, residents are encouraged to:

  • Know how to activate the fire alarm system if the system is not activated automatically
  • Know the locations of the fire extinguishers and how to operate them
  • Arrange their room contents with fire safety in mind
  • Maintain clear and unobstructed access to all room doors, from both the outside and inside
  • Not to use broken, frayed, or cracked electrical cords
  • Not to overload electrical outlets
  • Not to allow excess clutter or flammable materials to accumulate

 

Fire Safety Tips

Simple preventative measures can help prevent fires from erupting. It is important to consider fire safety when using any material or substance around heat or exposed to open flame, or in those areas involving electricity or chemicals in kitchens and labs. For housing residents, this is particularly important due to the presence of electric cook tops in their housing units. The following are helpful tips shared with housing residents:

  • Never leave cooking unattended
  • Do not assume an alarm is a false alarm
  • Do not use elevators in the event of a fire
  • Know at least two ways out of your building
  • If unable to exit the building, go to the nearest exit stairwell or safe area of refuge and call Public Safety at (425) 564-2400 or 911 to report your location.
  • If trained, use a fire extinguisher if the fire is small and contained, and the room is not filled with smoke.

 

Reporting a Fire in Campus Housing

Individuals who discover a fire should dial 9-1-1 and activate the fire alarm system, especially if the alarm system has not automatically been triggered. When sounded, the fire alarm system will summon the Bellevue Fire Department and Bellevue College Public Safety, but residents and staff are always encouraged to call, just in case.

When the alarm system in the Residence Hall is triggered, Public Safety will immediately contact the on-duty administrator and dispatch a Public Safety officer to the scene while housing staff begin the process of facilitating an orderly evacuation. Any and all fires should be reported to Public Safety immediately.

 

Fire Evacuation Procedures

Public Safety plans and conducts campus fire drills. These drills are for the benefit of student, faculty, and staff to improve awareness and preparation for effective fire prevention and response. Drills conducted in the Residence Hall are planned and announced, in advance. Following all completed drills, housing and Public Safety staff convene to evaluate the effectiveness of the drill and determine any areas where improvement is needed.

 

Students residing in Campus Housing

Instructions given to residents related to evacuation are clear: when the Residence Hall building alarm sounds, they are to proceed to the nearest building exit and move in a calm and orderly fashion directly to the assigned evacuation location. In the event of a discovered fire in the building, the procedures are as follows:

  • The resident who discovers the fire should immediately activate the nearest fire alarm system, if possible, while evacuating the building. In the event a fire alarm system did not activate, the resident who discovered the fire should immediately report the fire to 9-1-1 or if no phone is available should report to the housing office or Public Safety
  • All persons are required to leave the building immediately upon hearing a fire alarm
  • Close room doors and windows
  • Wear shoes and bring a coat
  • Leave via the nearest, safest exits, path, or route
  • Don’t panic— move quickly outside the building to the designated evacuation area
  • For individuals with mobility needs, each wing is equipped with an Area of Refuge notification button near the elevator that can directly contact Public Safety for assistance in evacuation

Housing staff will assist with the evacuation of the building as availability and safety permits. Once outside, staff will be directed to help guide students to the appropriate evacuation location, wait with students at the location and, when needed, take roll, and, when requested, may assist Bellevue Fire Department or Public Safety in other duties.

Failure to respond to a fire alarm or to staff requests during an evacuation may result in disciplinary action. Residents are instructed that they are to wait at the evacuation location until the “all-clear” has been given by the Bellevue Fire Department.

 

Housing Employees

All housing staff are CPR/First Aid/AED trained and receive an annual fire training from the Bellevue Fire Department in collaboration with Public Safety. Housing staff are instructed to following these guidelines in the case of a fire:

  • Safety of the People: Evacuate people as quickly as possible
  • Send the Alarm: Call the Fire Department at 9-1-1 and relay all information pertaining to the operator
  • Notify Public Safety and the housing professional staff immediately after calling 9-1-1
  • Notify others in the Area: Use any alarm provided for this purpose
  • Assist Public Safety or Firefighters: Relate to them what is burning (i.e. special chemicals, electrical appliance, cooking fire, etc.)

 

Fire Safety Systems in Residential Facilities

Buildings are equipped with a variety of features that are designed to detect, stop and/or suppress the spread of a fire. Each door that leads to a common or public area is fire rated and designed to automatically close in order to keep fire contained. Sprinkler heads are covered and reveal themselves automatically in case of a fire. Smoke detectors in all common and public areas of the Residence Hall are linked to trigger an evacuation. Smoke detectors inside private suites and apartments will only trigger an evacuation in case of actual fire. When the Residence Hall building alarms are activated

Bellevue Fire Department and Public Safety are automatically notified. Housing staff are notified, as well.

Campus housing is equipped with a wide array of fire and safety protocols in place for their residents. Each suite/apartment and wing is equipped with evacuation maps. Wing hallways are equipped with fire extinguishers that are easily accessible. Smoke Detectors are checked annually by an outside contracted fire safety company (AAA Fire & Safety, Inc.) to ensure their operational status. Smoke detectors are hard-wired into the building and have a backup power support in case of a power outage.

 

Suppression System

A sprinkler system is provided for additional safety in the event of a fire. Residents must be careful not to damage, tamper with, cover, or hang items from the sprinkler heads or an accidental discharge of water may result.

 

Plans for Future Improvements in Fire Safety

Bellevue College and campus housing continue to assess and upgrade fire safety equipment on an ongoing basis to ensure that all equipment meets National Fire Safety standards. Any future improvements identified will be made as needed. If needed improvements are ever determined, they will be specified in this report along with a plan for their implementation. However, no improvements in fire safety are currently needed.

 

Residential FacilityTotal Fires Fire NumberCause of FireNumber of Persons with Injuries Requiring Treatment at a Medical FacilityNumber of Deaths Related to a FireValue of Property Damage Caused by Fire
2488 Kelsey Creek Rd SE11Room Stove Combustible00$150.00
2508 Kelsey Creek Rd SE
000000
Fire Safety Systems in On Campus Residential Facilities - 2018
Residential FacilityCleary ClassificationFire Alarm Monitoring Pull StationsFire SprinklersSmoke DetectionFire ExtinguishersEvacuation Plans & Placards
2488 Kelsey Creek Rd SEOn campusYes Off-site ProprietorYesYesInside each room and in common areas
2508 Kelsey Creek Rd SE
On campusYesOff-site ProprietorYesYesInside each room and in common areas

Washington State Definitions

RCW 69.41.010

Definitions.

As used in this chapter, the following terms have the meanings indicated unless the context clearly requires otherwise:

(1) “Administer” means the direct application of a legend drug whether by injection, inhalation, ingestion, or any other means, to the body of a patient or research subject by:

(a) A practitioner; or

(b) The patient or research subject at the direction of the practitioner.

(2) “Commission” means the pharmacy quality assurance commission.

(3) “Community-based care settings” include: Community residential programs for persons with developmental disabilities, certified by the department of social and health services under chapter 71A.12 RCW; adult family homes licensed under chapter 70.128 RCW; and assisted living facilities licensed under chapter 18.20 RCW. Community-based care settings do not include acute care or skilled nursing facilities.

(4) “Deliver” or “delivery” means the actual, constructive, or attempted transfer from one person to another of a legend drug, whether or not there is an agency relationship.

(5) “Department” means the department of health.

(6) “Dispense” means the interpretation of a prescription or order for a legend drug and, pursuant to that prescription or order, the proper selection, measuring, compounding, labeling, or packaging necessary to prepare that prescription or order for delivery.

(7) “Dispenser” means a practitioner who dispenses.

(8) “Distribute” means to deliver other than by administering or dispensing a legend drug.

(9) “Distributor” means a person who distributes.

(10) “Drug” means:

(a) Substances recognized as drugs in the official United States pharmacopoeia, official homeopathic pharmacopoeia of the United States, or official national formulary, or any supplement to any of them;

(b) Substances intended for use in the diagnosis, cure, mitigation, treatment, or prevention of disease in human beings or animals;

(c) Substances (other than food, minerals or vitamins) intended to affect the structure or any function of the body of human beings or animals; and

(d) Substances intended for use as a component of any article specified in (a), (b), or (c) of this subsection. It does not include devices or their components, parts, or accessories.

(11) “Electronic communication of prescription information” means the transmission of a prescription or refill authorization for a drug of a practitioner using computer systems. The term does not include a prescription or refill authorization transmitted verbally by telephone nor a facsimile manually signed by the practitioner.

(12) “In-home care settings” include an individual’s place of temporary and permanent residence, but does not include acute care or skilled nursing facilities, and does not include community-based care settings.

(13) “Legend drugs” means any drugs which are required by state law or regulation of the pharmacy quality assurance commission to be dispensed on prescription only or are restricted to use by practitioners only.

(14) “Legible prescription” means a prescription or medication order issued by a practitioner that is capable of being read and understood by the pharmacist filling the prescription or the nurse or other practitioner implementing the medication order. A prescription must be hand printed, typewritten, or electronically generated.

(15) “Medication assistance” means assistance rendered by a non practitioner to an individual residing in a community-based care setting or in-home care setting to facilitate the individual’s self-administration of a legend drug or controlled substance. It includes reminding or coaching the individual, handing the medication container to the individual, opening the individual’s medication container, using an enabler, or placing the medication in the individual’s hand, and such other means of medication assistance as defined by rule adopted by the department. A non practitioner may help in the preparation of legend drugs or controlled substances for self-administration where a practitioner has determined and communicated orally or by written direction that such medication preparation assistance is necessary and appropriate. Medication assistance shall not include assistance with intravenous medications or injectable medications, except prefilled insulin syringes.

(16) “Person” means individual, corporation, government or governmental subdivision or agency, business trust, estate, trust, partnership or association, or any other legal entity.

(17) “Practitioner” means:

(a) A physician under chapter 18.71 RCW, an osteopathic physician or an osteopathic physician and surgeon under chapter 18.57 RCW, a dentist under chapter 18.32 RCW, a podiatric physician and surgeon under chapter 18.22 RCW, an East Asian medicine practitioner to the extent authorized under chapter 18.06 RCW and the rules adopted under RCW 18.06.010(1)(j), a veterinarian under chapter 18.92 RCW, a registered nurse, advanced registered nurse practitioner, or licensed practical nurse under chapter 18.79 RCW, an optometrist under chapter 18.53 RCW who is certified by the optometry board under RCW 18.53.010, an osteopathic physician assistant under chapter 18.57A RCW, a physician assistant under chapter 18.71A RCW, a naturopath licensed under chapter 18.36A RCW, a pharmacist under chapter 18.64 RCW, or, when acting under the required supervision of a dentist licensed under chapter 18.32 RCW, a dental hygienist licensed under chapter 18.29 RCW;

(b) A pharmacy, hospital, or other institution licensed, registered, or otherwise permitted to distribute, dispense, conduct research with respect to, or to administer a legend drug in the course of professional practice or research in this state; and

(c) A physician licensed to practice medicine and surgery or a physician licensed to practice osteopathic medicine and surgery in any state, or province of Canada, which shares a common border with the state of Washington.

(18) “Secretary” means the secretary of health or the secretary’s designee.

RCW 69.41.210

Definitions.

The terms defined in this section shall have the meanings indicated when used in RCW 69.41.200 through 69.41.260.

(1) “Commission” means the pharmacy quality assurance commission.

(2) “Distributor” means any corporation, person, or other entity which distributes for sale a legend drug under its own label even though it is not the actual manufacturer of the legend drug.

(3) “Legend drug” means any drugs which are required by state law or regulation of the commission to be dispensed as prescription only or are restricted to use by prescribing practitioners only and shall include controlled substances in Schedules II through V of chapter 69.50 RCW.

(4) “Solid dosage form” means capsules or tablets or similar legend drug products intended for administration and which could be ingested orally.

RCW 69.41.300

Definitions.

For the purposes of RCW 69.41.300 through 69.41.350, “steroids” shall include the following:

(1) “Anabolic steroids” means synthetic derivatives of testosterone or any isomer, ester, salt, or derivative that act in the same manner on the human body;

(2) “Androgens” means testosterone in one of its forms or a derivative, isomer, ester, or salt, that act in the same manner on the human body; and

(3) “Human growth hormones” means growth hormones, or a derivative, isomer, ester, or salt that act in the same manner on the human body.

RCW 69.50.101

Definitions.

The definitions in this section apply throughout this chapter unless the context clearly requires otherwise.

(a) “Administer” means to apply a controlled substance, whether by injection, inhalation, ingestion, or any other means, directly to the body of a patient or research subject by:

(1) A practitioner authorized to prescribe (or, by the practitioner’s authorized agent);

(2) The patient or research subject at the direction and in the presence of the practitioner.

(b) “Agent” means an authorized person who acts on behalf of or at the direction of a manufacturer, distributor, or dispenser. It does not include a common or contract carrier, public warehouseperson, or employee of the carrier or warehouseperson.

(c) “CBD concentration” has the meaning provided in RCW 69.51A.010.

(d) “CBD product” means any product containing or consisting of cannaboid oil.

(e) “Commission” means the pharmacy quality assurance commission.

(f) “Controlled substance” means a drug, substance, or immediate precursor included in Schedules I through V as set forth in federal or state laws, or federal or commission rules, but does not include industrial hemp as defined in RCW 15.120.010

 

Last Updated October 18, 2019