My Power. My Impact. My Vote. 2020

Dark silhouette of person with background of blue, white stripes, and red and white stars, with "VOTE!" above person, "My Power. My Impact." in yellow in the silhouette, and "Nov 3rd" in white at the bottom . Surrounded by "Vote!" in Spanish, Russian, Arabic, Vietnamese, Somali, and Chinese.
Image designed by Zuheb Siddique, DMA 103 Summer student

Download and share this amazing image with others in your community!

Resources & Information

Go to the tabs near the bottom of the page for important dates, events, FAQs, and more! Review the links below for details about how and why to vote, in various languages.

US election 2020: A really simple guide (BBC World)
الانتخابات الأمريكية 2020: دليل مبسط لكلما تريد معرفته عن العملية الانتخابية
美国大选:十个基本问题和关键信息
Выборы президента США-2020 для “чайников” – самый простой путеводитель
Una guía muy simple para entender las elecciones en Estados Unidos
Bầu cử 2020: Giải thích đơn giản về hệ thống chính trị Mỹ

Help us out by completing a 2-minute survey!

Do people at our college vote? Have they paid attention to the Census? How do they participate in their communities?

Bellevue College would like to collect data about the voter and civic engagement of its students, faculty, and staff. This information will better allow the college to plan activities that build our collective voice in our communities and across the nation.

We encourage all members of the Bellevue College community, no matter age or citizenship status, to complete this 2-minute survey (click blue button below), preferably by October 25. At this time, the survey is only available in English. All responses are anonymous and confidential. Please contact Sapan Parekh with questions.


Important Election Dates

Round image with red and blue with white starts and bold "Vote!" in middle
Image designed by William Pugh, DMA 103 Summer student
  • September 17 – Constitution Day
  • September 22 – National Voter Registration Day
  • September 29 – First Presidential Debate (6-7:30pm PT)
  • October 7 – Vice Presidential Debate (6-7:30pm PT)
  • October 7 – Washington State Governor Debate (8-9pm PT)
  • October 14-16 – First Batch of WA Ballots Mailed to Registered Voters
  • October 15 – Second Presidential Debate (6-7:30pm PT)
  • October 22 – Third Presidential Debate (6-7:30pm PT) – Stream live on YouTube
  • October 26 – Final Date for Online Registration
  • October 27 – Reminder: Return Ballots 7+ Days Before Election Day
  • November 3 – Final Date for In-Person Registration
  • November 3 – Final Date to Send or Drop Off Ballots (Voting Day!)

Download this fantastic VOTE sticker created by our Digital Media Arts student!

BC Voter Engagement Events and Activities

The Voter Engagement Committee is excited to bring you this incredible list of events. From panel discussions to debate watch parties, from deliberative dialogues to chats over Facebook Live, there are so many ways for you to engage with voting. These events are free and open to all at Bellevue College, no matter your ability or inclination to vote. All times below are in Pacific Time.

NOTE: Most video conferencing platforms, like Zoom, lack live captioning. If you would benefit from live captions, you can use a program like Otter.ai. Just download the app from Apple or Android, open it, create a meeting, and start recording (the microphone icon) when the event starts. Place the phone where it can pick up your computer speaker, and it will generate captions for you.

Click the events below to find out more!

Time: 6:00-7:30pm, September 29 2020

Join college students from 26 states in discussing the debates in real time! Sponsored by the American Democracy Project, these moderated text-only chats over Discord will given you an opportunity to share your thoughts and participate in meaningful dialogue around this key democratic event. Though the debate will end at 7:30pm, you can stick around for further discussion. Bellevue College faculty and staff are also welcome to participate.

To participate, follow the instructions in the image below. If you already are registered with Discord, just click this link to join the Debate Watch 2020 server. Read the #rules before jumping into #roles. Please do not share this link with people outside of Bellevue College, or post the link on your own social media.

Details for Debate Watch Parties through the American Democracy Project
Click here for details about how to join the Debate Watch Parties using Discord!

Time: 9:00am-10:00am, September 30 2020

Join faculty, staff, and students from across the country for a national discussion to debrief and discuss the first Presidential Debate. Designed to reach across differences and create a space for discourse, this national facilitated dialogue is based on the fundamental value of the pursuit of knowledge for the public good. We will provide access to articles covering the previous night’s debate and use those for guided questions and prompts for a lively conversation.

Moderator: American Democracy Project
Register here.

Time: 10:00am-4:00pm, September 30 2020

Learn more about voting, the Census, and civic engagement at the virtual Get Involved Day, a part of the Week of Welcome. This event, organized by Student Programs will feature four (4) distinctively themed meeting links broken up by interest area. Student attendees will be able to jump around to the different “rooms” as they see fit. Representatives from all over campus will be standing by to engage and answer questions. You can talk with the Census & Civic Engagement team in the Main / Resources Room. And while there, visit the other rooms and learn about clubs and organizations, academic and professional programs, and cultural / identity groups.

Organizer: Student Programs
Links for Microsoft Teams will be available the day of the event

Time: 5:00pm-6:00pm, October 5 2020

A discussion with Black political consultants, analysts, and activists about the importance of activism, representation, and advocacy in Washington State. Across America, people are marching for racial justice, our panelists will tell their stories about working for racial justice here in Washington State within the state-house and out in the streets by helping to build campaigns to hold police accountable and change Washington’s history of disinvesting in Black, Indigenous and People of Color communities. The panel will feature professionals from Black-owned consulting firms, activists, and local leaders. This virtual event (see Zoom below) is completely free to the public!

Moderator: Cliff Cawthon, Bellevue College’s Political Science Department
Click to join Zoom. Or call in using 1-253-215-8782 and enter 85112013825 as the meeting ID.

Time: 10:30am-11:00am, October 6 2020

This discussion with Jeren Totten, staff assistant to Rep. Kim Schrier will cover what it’s like to work for a new Congress member.  We will also discuss an open internship with Rep. Schrier’s office and how students can apply.

Moderator: Dr. Christina Sciabarra, Bellevue College’s Political Science Department
Watch the conversation.

Time: 6:00-7:30pm, October 7 2020

Join college students from 26 states in discussing the debates in real time! Sponsored by the American Democracy Project, these moderated text-only chats over Discord will given you an opportunity to share your thoughts and participate in meaningful dialogue around this key democratic event. Though the debate will end at 7:30pm, you can stick around for further discussion. Bellevue College faculty and staff are also welcome to participate.

To participate, follow the instructions in the image below. If you already are registered with Discord, just click this link to join the Debate Watch 2020 server. Read the #rules before jumping into #roles. Please do not share this link with people outside of Bellevue College, or post the link on your own social media.

Details for Debate Watch Parties through the American Democracy Project
Click here for details about how to join the Debate Watch Parties using Discord!

Time: 9:00am-10:00am, October 8 2020

Join faculty, staff, and students from across the country for a national discussion to debrief and discuss the Vice Presidential Debate. Designed to reach across differences and create a space for discourse, this national facilitated dialogue is based on the fundamental value of the pursuit of knowledge for the public good. We will provide access to articles covering the previous night’s debate and use those for guided questions and prompts for a lively conversation.

Moderator: American Democracy Project
Register here.

Time: The documentary will be available for viewing anytime between October 9 to October 22

First Vote is a character-driven documentary film with unparalleled access to a diverse cross section of politically engaged Chinese Americans: a gun-toting Tea Party-favorite candidate courting GOP votes in the South; a podcaster in Ohio who became a citizen in order to vote for Trump; a progressive journalist confronting Chinese Americans for Trump after moving to a battleground state; and a University of North Carolina professor teaching about race and racism in the US. A vérité look at Chinese American electoral organizing in North Carolina and Ohio, the film weaves their stories from the presidential election of 2016 to the 2018 midterms, and explores the intersection of immigration, voting rights and racial justice.

Until 1952, federal law barred immigrants of Asian descent from becoming U.S. citizens and voting. Today, Asian Americans are the fastest growing population in the United States. More than 11 million Asian Americans will be able to vote in 2020. Directed by Yi Chen, a Chinese immigrant and first-time voter herself, First Vote is a must-watch and rare long-form look at the diverse Asian American electorate.

After watching the movie, send a 100-word reflection to APISA answering the question: How did the movie resonate with you? Ten (10) responses will be chosen to receive a Bokksu. Send your reflection by October 26, 2020.

Sponsored by the Bellevue College Asian and Pacific Islanders Student Association (APISA)
Click here to view the film.

Image for the First Vote film with different Asians people

Time: 4:00pm-5:00/5:30pm, October 15 2020

Many Americans are worried about security in voting. Many others lack confidence in the fairness of election processes. What should the country to do to strengthen our elections? How do we prioritize our limited time and resources – protecting the integrity of our votes or removing barriers to voting, or some combination of both? Join college students from across the country in this entirely virtual, text only event. You will explore three options for addressing concerns around elections, rank trade-offs and consequences, and explore the opinions of other participants. No video or audio needed. Through this event, you will better understand perspectives that differ from your own, and thus be able to engage others in this important issue. For a more interactive, audiovisual version of this event, register for the event on October 28.

Moderator: Kettering Foundation
Register here.

Time: 5:00pm-5:30pm, October 15 2020

We will talk about what led Joe to run for office, his first year in the legislature, and his thoughts on how to move forward from COVID.  This event will be held on Facebook Live – stay tuned for how to join!

Moderator: Dr. Christina Sciabarra, Bellevue College’s Political Science Department
Watch the conversation.

Time: 6:00-7:30pm, September 29 2020

Join college students from 26 states in discussing the debates in real time! Sponsored by the American Democracy Project, these moderated text-only chats over Discord will given you an opportunity to share your thoughts and participate in meaningful dialogue around this key democratic event. Though the debate will end at 7:30pm, you can stick around for further discussion. Bellevue College faculty and staff are also welcome to participate.

To participate, follow the instructions in the image below. If you already are registered with Discord, just click this link to join the Debate Watch 2020 server. Read the #rules before jumping into #roles. Please do not share this link with people outside of Bellevue College, or post the link on your own social media.

Details for Debate Watch Parties through the American Democracy Project
Click here for details about how to join the Debate Watch Parties using Discord!

Time: 3:30pm-4:30pm, October 20 2020

More and more people who identify as queer or LGBTQ+ are running for public office. District 43, Position 1 in Seattle has the distinction of being the elected seat longest held in the world by someone who is openly queer (1987 to today). So, what does it mean to be an elected official and openly LGBTQ+? How does this identity, among many others, engage with the work of representing a diverse constituency? Join us as we talk with openly out officials – State Senator Claire Wilson & Seattle School Board President Zachary DeWolf (and possibly a third person) – engaged in public life about what queerness and other identities mean to them in their roles. This event is sponsored by the Bellevue College LGBTQ+ Task Force.

Moderator: Sapan Parekh, Bellevue College’s RISE Learning Institute
View the recording.

Time: 1:30pm-2:30pm, October 21 2020

Why does someone choose to run for office? What do they hope to achieve? How do they represent the variety of constituents once they are elected? Why does voting matter? What are their greatest challenges, and how do they stay positive and focused in a world of partisanship? Join current or former officials – Governor Gary Locke, Washington Supreme Court Justice Mary Yu, and Bellevue City Councilmember Jeremy Barksdale – in discussing the importance of elected office and the power of the vote. This event is co-sponsored by the Bellevue College Foundation and the BC RISE Learning Institute.

Moderators: Rebecca Chawgo, Executive Director, Bellevue College Foundation; Sapan Parekh, Associate Director, RISE Learning Institute
View the recording. (Password: vTDp3i?4)

Time: 6:00-7:30pm, September 29 2020

Join college students from 26 states in discussing the debates in real time! Sponsored by the American Democracy Project, these moderated text-only chats over Discord will given you an opportunity to share your thoughts and participate in meaningful dialogue around this key democratic event. Though the debate will end at 7:30pm, you can stick around for further discussion. Bellevue College faculty and staff are also welcome to participate.

To participate, follow the instructions in the image below. If you already are registered with Discord, just click this link to join the Debate Watch 2020 server. Read the #rules before jumping into #roles. Please do not share this link with people outside of Bellevue College, or post the link on your own social media.

Details for Debate Watch Parties through the American Democracy Project
Click here for details about how to join the Debate Watch Parties using Discord!

Time: 1:00pm-2:00pm, October 23 2020

Join faculty, staff, and students from across the country for a national discussion to debrief and discuss the final Presidential Debate. Designed to reach across differences and create a space for discourse, this national facilitated dialogue is based on the fundamental value of the pursuit of knowledge for the public good. We will provide access to articles covering the previous night’s debate and use those for guided questions and prompts for a lively conversation.

Moderator: American Democracy Project
Register here.

Time: 10:30am-11:20am, October 27 2020

While we can recognize that women fought and won the right to vote 100 years ago, this panel focuses on the continued actions of women activists working to bring about change.  This discussion with local activists and professionals working in the fields of health equity, climate justice, and art as resistance will leave participants motivated to take action!

Moderator: Dr. Christina Sciabarra, Bellevue College’s Political Science Department
Watch the conversation.

Time: 6:00pm-7:00pm, October 27 2020

King County Elections is getting ready to process more than a million ballots for the upcoming November 3 Election in a climate unlike any other in recent history. Chief of Staff Kendall Hodson will provide an overview of the 2020 Presidential Election including hot topics like United States Postal Service concerns, security of ballot drop boxes and vote-by-mail, and what happens to your ballot as it goes through the process. She will also talk about their challenge to King County voters to #hit90 percent turnout and what you need to do to make sure you voice is heard this November.

Moderator: Taylor Dalrymple, Bellevue College’s Adult Basic Education Department
Click to join Zoom. Or call in using 1-253-215-8782 and enter 81773290922 as the meeting ID.

Time: 3:00pm-4:30pm, October 28 2020

Many Americans are worried about security in voting. Many others lack confidence in the fairness of election processes. What should the country to do to strengthen our elections? How do we prioritize our limited time and resources – protecting the integrity of our votes or removing barriers to voting, or some combination of both? As we enter the final week of the 2020 Election, join others at BC for a deep dialogue focused on solutions and beyond the walls of party lines. You will be an active participant, so be prepared to talk with other students, faculty, and staff, share opinions and information that matter to you, and listen to the viewpoints of others who might think differently from you. Do not expect to resolve this question; but do expect to better understand different perspectives on this important issue. This virtual dialogue will be “face-to-face” over Zoom. For a less audiovisual format, register for the “With the People” event on October 15. Seats are limited, and registration ends October 25. Make sure that you have access to audio and video capabilities.

Facilitator: Sapan Parekh, Bellevue College’s RISE Learning Institute.


Time: 1:15pm, November 6 2020

Please be patient with one another during this time. Regardless of where you stand politically, we are all going to be colleagues, faculty, staff, students, and community on the other side of this. We don’t always agree, nor should we. Healthy debate, critical discourse, and critical analysis are the hallmarks of an academic community. However, in the midst of that, we cannot afford to lose our humanity and forget that there is a difference between politics and fundamental human rights. We want to acknowledge the impact the election may have on our students, faculty, staff, and extended community. The college has prepared this session to begin the healing and engage in moving together instead of apart.

Co-hosts: Student Programs, Student Affairs, and the Office of Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion
Join the Town Hall.

Time: 11:00am-12:30pm, November 7 2020

Americans have some important work ahead to build and strengthen a democracy that’s healthy and thriving—regardless of the outcome of the election. But one thing’s for sure, a strong democracy depends on strong citizens. And building up our power as citizens isn’t something to do alone. That’s exactly the reason why we host Civic Saturday gatherings—as do people in all corners of the country. Join us on November 7 at 11am PT and come together in civic community to reflect on our vital role as citizens. Bring your whole-hearted, authentic selves to this gathering. Bring friends. Bring your vision for the future of our country.

Hosted by: Citizen University
Register for this free event.

Time: 1:00pm-2:00pm, November 11 2020

Join faculty, staff, and students from across the country for a national discussion to debrief and discuss the entire Election. Designed to reach across differences and create a space for discourse, this national facilitated dialogue is based on the fundamental value of the pursuit of knowledge for the public good. We will provide access to articles covering the elections and use those for guided questions and prompts for a lively conversation.

Moderator: American Democracy Project
Register here.

Celebrate Your Vote on Social Media!

Post on social media a photo of you with your ballot stub and #BulldogImpact.
If posting on Instagram, feel free to tag @bellevuecollege on it so we can regram it!

Photo of person holding red ballot stub

Note: For security, cover up any information that might link to your ballot, including the QR code. Also, if you tag @bellevuecollege, we will not be able to regram it if your face is in it. So, consider posting a photo similar to this one!

Or, download any of the state’s “I Voted” stickers and post on social media with #BulldogImpact. Tag @bellevuecollege if using Instagram. To download, right click on the image of your choice and save it.

White and red circle with blue star in middle that says "I VOTED"

Huge thanks to the following members of the Bellevue College Voter Engagement Committee:

  • Amy McCrory, Supervisor, Student Business Center & Student Programs Front Desk
  • Becca Cole, Residence Life Coordinator, Student Housing
  • Dr. Brenda Ivelisse, Associate Vice President, Student Affairs
  • Carrie M. Moore, Director, Student Programs
  • Dr. Christina Sciabarra, Faculty, Political Science
  • Clifford Cawthon, Faculty, Political Science and Culture & Ethnic Studies
  • Dr. David Spataro, Faculty & Program Chair, Political Science
  • Dr. Gilbert Villalpando, Interim Vice President, Diversity Equity & Inclusion
  • Javier Womeldorff, Director, Bellevue College Foundation
  • LaMeshia Reese-Taylor, Program Specialist & Leadership Advisor, Student Programs
  • Mckaylia Marshall, AmeriCorps VISTA, United Way Benefits Hub
  • Nicole Beattie, Associate Director of Communications, Institutional Advancement
  • Quan Nghiem, Legislative Affairs Representative, Associated Student Government
  • Dr. Robert Viens, Associate Vice President, Academic Affairs
  • Sapan Parekh, Associate Director of Service-Learning & Community Engagement, RISE Learning Institute
  • Taylor Dalrymple, Faculty, Adult Basic Education
  • Tracy Biga-MacLean, Associate Director, Effectiveness Research & Grants
  • Zak Yousuf, Interim Assistant Director, Multicultural Services
  • Special thank you to Rebecca Chawgo & Chris Anderson of Institutional Advancement, and to Mariella Lawson of Digital Media Arts, for their support

Frequently Asked Questions about Voting in Washington State

Q. Am I eligible to vote? If you can answer yes to each of these statements, you are eligible to vote.

  • I am a U.S. Citizen
  • I will be at least 18 years old by or on Election Day
  • I will have lived in Washington for at least 30 days before the election
  • I am not presently denied my right to vote as a result of being under the authority of the Department of Corrections for a felony conviction (see below)

Q: Is it too late to register for this election? To register by mail or online, your application must be received no later than 8 days before Election Day (October 26). Register to vote in person during business hours and any time before 8:00 PM on Election Day (November 3). You can register in person at a voting center; the voting center in the Bellevue College gymnasium is the only center on the Eastside.

Q: How do I register to vote? If you live in Washington, go to its voter site. If you live outside Washington, the national site can help you.

Q. I am not yet 18 years old. Can I still register? Yes. 16 and 17 year old citizens can register to vote in WA. You will automatically receive ballots once you turn 18. If you move, you will need to update your address. If you are using the older voter registration forms, you can disregard the language that says “I will be 18 by the next election.” The updated forms say “I am at least 16 years old.”

Q. I am an immigrant / refugee. Can I still vote? Yes, as long as you are 18 years old and a US citizen. You can register to vote as long as you are 16 years old and a US citizen.

Q. How can I vote? In Washington, all voting is conducted through mail. To fill the ballot, you will use a pen to fill in the ovals corresponding to your preferred candidates/ responses, remove the ballot stub, place the ballot within a protective slip, seal the envelope, and sign the back. Then, mail it or take it to your local post office. There is no stamp or postage necessary. Do not FedEx, UPS, or Amazon Lockers for your ballot. You can also return your ballot via an official drop box. You can find the location of your nearest drop box by logging into the state’s voting site. Traditionally, you could also visit a Voting Center on Election Day in case you need to vote in person, but they may be closed due to COVID-19. However, if you have a disability that prevents you from voting by mail, voting centers should be able to support you. See below.

Q. When can I vote? Ballots will start being mailed to registered voters on October 16. You can stick the ballot in the mail anytime before your local postal worker picks up mail on November 3. You can also take the sealed ballot to your post office before it closes. If using a drop box, the ballots must be placed in them by 8pm on November 3. It is strongly encouraged that you complete and return your ballot as early as possible, as this will help reduce burdens on postal workers and elections officials.

Q. What do I do if I haven’t received my ballot? Your ballot is mailed to you at least 18 days before each election. If you haven’t received it, verify your registration and address. Then, contact Voter Registration Customer Service at VRSupport@sos.wa.gov or call 800-448-4881. Because of the pandemic, the Elections office will likely be closed to the general public until further notice so please don’t go in person.

Q: What services are available to voters living with disabilities? As a voter with a disability, you can request a reasonable accommodation or assistance to vote. The Office of the Secretary of State is committed to ensuring accessibility at voting centers, and that you have the opportunity to vote privately and independently. Accessible formats of the voters’ pamphlet are available online. If you wish to join the subscription list to receive a copy on USB drive of the Voters’ Pamphlet, please contact the voter hotline at (800) 448-4881 or email voterspamphlet@sos.wa.gov. Accessible voting units (AVUs) are available until 8 p.m. on Election Day. You can also get support with voting at a voting center; the only one on the Eastside is located in the Bellevue College gymnasium. Read more about voting accessibility…

Q: What is the law on felons voting? If a person was convicted of a felony in Washington, the right to vote is restored once the person completes their sentence and is not under the authority (in prison or in community custody) of the Department of Corrections (DOC). Once the right to vote is restored, the person must re-register to vote in order to receive a ballot. If the felony conviction is from another state or in federal court, the right to vote is restored as long as the person is not currently incarcerated for that felony. You do not lose you right to vote in Washington for a misdemeanor or juvenile conviction, even if you were incarcerated. If you have questions about your status with DOC, you can call (800) 430-9674. Read more about felons and voting rights…

Q. What do I do if I don’t have a home or stable address? You can register by providing a physical location where you spend most of your time, and a valid mailing address. You can use the address or cross-streets of the shelter (e.g. 10th and Pike, 98122), park, vehicle, intersection or other identifiable location that you consider your current residence if you do not have a traditional residential address. This location will be used to determine which precinct you will vote in. Along with your residential address, you must also provide a valid mailing address. You need a mailing address in order to receive your ballot and election information on time. You could use a post office box, address of a friend or relative, shelter, day center, or Community Service Office where you can get mail, or general delivery at a local post office.

Q. Do I need to have an ID in order to vote in Washington? No. But it can be helpful when registering to vote. If you do not have a Washington ID (including driver’s licence or permit), then you will need to use the last four (4) digits of your Social Security Number to register.

Q: What kind of turnaround do we expect for this election? How long will it take to get results for the majority of the ballots? The first set of results will be published online at around 8:15 p.m. Results are certified by counties 21 days after a General Election (10 days after a Special Election & 14 days after a Primary). The State certifies Primary results no later than 30 days after a General Election (17 days after a Primary).

Q: Is it OK to selfie myself holding my completed ballot and post it on social media? The state of Washington does not directly prohibit ballot selfies.  However, it is illegal to view another’s ballot for a purpose prohibited by law, such as vote buying. You can also post a selfie with your ballot stub and the hashtag #BulldogImpact.

Q: Is our election system secure from cyberattack? Washington employs the recommendations raised by security experts, and have done so for years, such as paper-based systems, including voter verifiable paper audit trails; independent testing; pre- and post-election audits; and physical security of tabulation equipment. The VoteWA system is secured by highly skilled Office of the Secretary of State IT staff and Security Operations Center, using state of the art equipment and following IT industry best practices. We have embarked on an unprecedented opportunity to work collaboratively with the Department of Homeland Security to ensure that our election systems remain secure. This partnership allows us to work together, elections and IT experts, working hand in hand to ensure our systems are secure. Read more about election system security…

Q: Can the election be rigged? Washington employs the recommendations raised by security experts, and have done so for years. Such as paper based systems, including voter verifiable paper audit trails, independent testing, pre- and post-election audits, and physical security of tabulation equipment. Before a tabulation system can be used in Washington, we require testing at a federally approved independent testing lab. These expert testers include security reviews as a part of their overall testing efforts.  Then, systems are tested here at the state level and reviewed by our own voting systems certification board, comprised of technology experts, accessibility experts, and certified county election officials.  Counties must then perform acceptance testing and logic and accuracy testing prior to every election. In addition, we conduct post-election audits, where we draw precincts and races at random and compare the vote totals from the tabulator to a hand count of ballots before the election is certified.

Q: How can you tell if somebody tries to vote more than one ballot? Each voter has a single active record in the statewide voter registration database (VoteWA). When a ballot is received by the Election Division, the signature is compared to the voter’s registration and the voter’s record is marked as having returned a ballot. If the voter attempts to return an additional ballot, the system warns the election official that a ballot has already been returned.  Election workers report that information to the canvassing board, who in turn reports it to the Prosecuting Attorney if further investigation is warranted.

(Information provided by the Washington Secretary of State, the Washington ACLU, and the Washington Bus.)

Share the Message. Increase Voter Turnout!

The more people who vote, the better for everyone! Here are some simple things you can do to increase voter registration and encourage people to submit their ballots:


Download and share the fantastic images created by our Digital Media Arts students. Post them on social media with #BulldogImpact. Tag @bellevuecollege if using Instagram. If you have access to a color printer, consider posting the flyer in a window or somewhere your neighbors will see it.


Share Vote411 with your communities. They can use this site to check their voter registration status, learn about local issues and candidates, find polling places, discover local debates, and more. Organized by the League of Women Voters Education Fund.


Pledge to register three (3) new people. As long as someone is 16 years old and is a citizen, they are eligible to register. See the Voting FAQs tab for more details.

Pledge to convince ten (10) people to return their ballots by October 27 and/or turn out to vote on November 3. For the former, require that they send you a photo, by October 27, of their ballot stub or of themselves dropping the ballot into the mail or ballot box. For the latter, organize a group of 10 people (not including yourself) to wait in line together (with masks and social distancing) at the local polling place on November 3.


Take the Pledge with All In to Vote. Enter your information, and keep updated and get reminders to ensure that you vote. And, you can triple your pledge by encouraging three friends to vote. Check out the website for lots of information about elections and voting.


Add “Don’t forget to register to vote!” to your email signature.


Volunteer with a local, nonpartisan nonprofit focused on voter registration and get out the vote efforts. Most volunteering is done remotely. Here are some local organizations offering volunteer opportunities:


Last Updated October 21, 2021