6520P Animals On Campus (Procedures)

Original Date: 6/9/2009 * Last Revision Effective: 9/24/2012
Policy Contact: Vice President, Administrative Services

Purpose

The guidelines below have been developed with the understanding that most service animals working on the college campus will be dogs. All individuals who bring a service animal to campus are strongly encouraged to register with the disability resource center. In addition, it is particularly important that, if another kind of animal is to be employed as a service animal on campus, the partner (person with a disability) contact the disability resource center as soon as possible to explore any additional health or safety concerns.

Procedures

Types of Service Dogs

  • Guide dog is a carefully trained dog that serves as a travel tool by persons with severe visual impairments or who are blind.
  • Hearing dog is a dog who has been trained to alert a person with significant hearing loss or who is deaf when a sound, e.g., knock on the door, occurs.
  • Service/support dog is a dog that has been trained to assist a person who has a mobility or health impairment. Types of duties the dog may perform include carrying, fetching, opening doors, ringing doorbells, activating elevator buttons, steadying a person while walking, helping a person up after the person falls, etc.
  • SSigdog is a dog trained to assist a person with autism. The dog alerts the partner to distracting repetitive movements common among those with autism, allowing the person to stop the movement (e.g., hand flapping). A person with autism may have problems with sensory input and need the same support services from a dog as those that a person who is blind or deaf may need.
  • Seizure response dog is a dog trained to assist a person with a seizure disorder; how the dog serves the person depends on the person’s needs. The dog may stand guard over the person during a seizure, or the dog may go for help. A few dogs have somehow learned to predict a seizure and warn the person in advance.

Responsibilities

Faculty/Staff/Students

  • Allow a service animal to accompany the partner at all times and everywhere on campus except, where service animals are specifically prohibited.
  • Do not pet a service animal; petting a service animal when the animal is working distracts the animal from the task at hand.
  • Do not feed a service animal; the service animal may have specific dietary requirements; unusual food or food at an unexpected time may cause the animal to become ill or to be distracted.
  • Do not deliberately startle a service animal.
  • Do not separate or attempt to separate a partner from her or his service animal.

Persons with Disabilities (Partners) Using Service Animals on Campus

  • A partner who utilizes a service animal is strongly encouraged to register with the disability resource center;
  • The cost of care, arrangements, and responsibilities for the well-being of a service animal are the sole responsibility of the owner at all times;
  • A partner who utilizes a service animal must ensure that all requirements for the presence of animals in public places (vaccinations, licensure, ID tags, etc.) as mandated by the State of Washington and King County are followed;
  • The partner must be in full control of the animal at all times; reasonable behavior is expected from service animals while on campus. If a service dog, for example, exhibits unacceptable behavior, the partner is expected to employ the proper training techniques to correct the situation.
  • The partner must follow local ordinances in cleaning up after the animal defecates. Individuals with disabilities who physically cannot clean up after their own service animal may not be required to pick up and dispose of feces. However, these individuals should make other arrangements for cleaning up feces.

Disability Resource Center

  • The disability resource center (DRC) serves as the central point of contact for any individual utilizing a service animal on campus;
  • The DRC coordinates support with other administrative offices and academic divisions to implement support and safety measures for individuals with disabilities and their service animal while on campus;
  • The DRC hears complaints or other concerns regarding service animals on campus; whether from a partner who utilizes a service animal or from another campus community individual who has a concern about a service animal on campus.

Service Animals on Campus Must

  • Meet non-college requirements: all requirements for the presence of animals in public places (vaccinations, licensure, ID tags, etc.) mandated by Washington State and King County ordinance must be followed.
  • Be healthy: the animal must be in good health.
  • Be under control of partner: The person with a disability must be in full control of the animal at all times. Reasonable behavior is expected from service animals while on campus. If a service dog, for example, exhibits unacceptable behavior, the partner is expected to employ the proper training techniques to correct the situation.

Cleanup Rule

The partner must follow local ordinances in cleaning up after the animal defecates. Individuals with disabilities who physically cannot clean up after their own service animal may not be required to pick up and dispose of feces. However, these individuals should make other arrangements for cleaning up after their service animal. The partner is responsible for the care and supervision of a service animal as follows:

  • Regardless of whether the animal is in a private office or a common area, the owner is responsible for immediate cleanup and repairs of incidental damage caused by the animal. Cleanup should be thorough enough so as to generate no additional work for college staff.
  • While on BC property, the owner must have a means to clean up after the animal. Specifically, “the owner or person(s) who possess or control the animal when appearing with the animal on any public walk, street, recreation area or private property shall possess the means of removal of any fecal matter left by the animal.”
  • Unless the animal is on unmowed, unmaintained, or designated area, the owner is responsible for immediate cleanup of incidental damage caused by the animal (including digging damage). Cleanup should be thorough enough so as to generate no additional work for college staff or inconvenience for the college community; i.e., students, faculty, visitors, etc.

Removal of Service Animals

Disruption: The partner of an animal that is unruly or disruptive (e.g., barking, running around, bringing attention to itself) may be asked to remove the animal from college facilities. If the improper behavior happens repeatedly, the partner may be told not to bring the animal into any college facility until the partner takes significant steps to mitigate the behavior. Mitigation can include muzzling a barking animal or refresher training for both the animal and the partner.

Ill Health: Service animals that are ill should not be taken into public areas. A partner with an ill animal may be asked to leave college facilities.

Uncleanliness: Partners with animals that are unclean, noisome and/or bedraggled may be asked to leave college facilities. An animal that becomes wet from walking in the rain or mud or from being splashed on by a passing automobile, but is otherwise is clean, should be considered a clean animal. Animals that shed in the spring sometimes look bedraggled. If the animal in question usually is well groomed, consider the animal tidy even though its spring coat is uneven and messy appearing or it has become wet from weather or weather-related incidents.

Areas Off Limits to Service Animals

Research laboratories: The natural organisms carried by dogs and other animals may negatively affect the outcome of the research. At the same time, the chemicals and/or organisms used in the research may be harmful to service animals.

Mechanical rooms/custodial closets: Mechanical rooms, such as boiler rooms, facility equipment rooms, electric closets, elevator control rooms and custodial closets, are off-limits to service animals. The machinery and/or chemicals in these rooms may be harmful to animals.

Areas where protective clothing is necessary: Any room where protective clothing is worn is off-limits to service animals. Examples impacting students include the foundry, glass laboratory, wood shops and metal/machine shops.

Areas where there is a danger to the service animal: Any room, including a classroom, where there are sharp metal cuttings or other sharp objects on the floor or protruding from a surface; where there is hot material on the floor (e.g., molten metal or glass); where there is a high level of dust; or where there is moving machinery is off-limits to service animals.

Exceptions

  • A laboratory director may open her or his laboratory to all service animals.
  • A laboratory director of a research laboratory or an instructor in a classroom or teaching laboratory with moving equipment may grant permission to an individual animal/partner team to enter the research laboratory or classroom or teaching laboratory with moving machinery. Admission for each team will be granted or denied on a case-by-case basis. The final decision shall be made based on the nature of research or machinery and the best interest of the animal. Example: the machinery in a classroom may have moving parts at a height such that the tail of a large dog could easily be caught in it; this is a valid reason for keeping large dogs out. However, a very small hearing dog may be shorter than any moving part and, therefore, considered for admission to the classroom.
  • Access to other designated off-limits areas may be granted on a case-by-case basis.

Complaints

Any partner dissatisfied with a decision made concerning a service animal may file a complaint with the Director of the Disability Resource Center. The director is responsible for reviewing the complaint, gathering facts, talking with appropriate parties, and reaching a conclusion regarding the complaint. The director may request external assistance to meet with the partner who is complaining in order to bring in additional perspectives. The director is responsible for making a determination and communicating that to the partner as soon as possible

Appeal

Any individual with a disability who utilizes a service animal, has filed a complaint with the college, and is dissatisfied with the disposition of the complaint may file an appeal with the vice president of student services. The appeal should be filed in writing within ten (10) days of notification of the complaint results. The person writing the appeal should identify why he/she is dissatisfied with the outcome of the complaint and provide any additional information to be considered. The vice president of student services will consider the appeal and render a written decision to both parties within fifteen (15) days of receiving the written appeal. The decision of the vice president of student services, which will be sent via regular U.S. mail to both parties shall be final.

Definitions

Service Animals

  • As established by the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA), service animals shall not be excluded from college facilities or activities. The ADA defines a service animal as: “…any dog that is individually trained to do work or perform tasks for the benefit of an individual with a disability, including a physical, sensory, psychiatric, intellectual, or other mental disability. Other species of animals, whether wild or domestic, trained or untrained, are not service animals for the purposes of this definition.

To work on campus, a service animal must be specifically trained to do work or perform tasks for the benefit of an individual with a disability, including, but not limited to, guiding individuals with impaired vision, alerting individuals who are hearing impaired to intruders or sounds, providing minimal protection or rescue work, pulling a wheelchair, or fetching dropped items. If an animal meets this definition, it is considered a service animal for the purposes of this policy regardless of whether it has been licensed or certified by a state or local government or a training program. An animal who is ‘in training’ to become a service animal shall be considered to be a service animal for the purposes of this policy.

Service animals whose behavior poses a direct threat to the health or safety of others or is disruptive to the campus community may be excluded regardless of training or certification.

Relevant Laws and Other Resources

Revision History

Original 6/9/2009
Revisions 8/31/2010; 9/24/2012

Approved By

President’s Staff