RISE for Faculty

Teacher with students observing experiment

Instructors at Bellevue College have an immense responsibility before them. They are tasked with taking students from various backgrounds and levels of experience, and shaping them into critical thinkers and active learners ready to face the world beyond the BC campus. Through their hard work, BC faculty create future professionals and academics, engineers and artists, community leaders and global citizens. Our faculty know that education is more than just books and lectures; it takes creativity and perspiration.

The RISE Learning Institute applauds the immense work BC instructors put into improving the learning experience for their students, and we strive to contribute to that work by being a source of support, funding, ideas, and recognition.

RISE is for faculty.

RISE is Research

The RISE Learning Institute empowers BC faculty and students interested in research.  RISE recognizes that teaching and learning will always be paramount at BC, but we also know that engaging in research can be a powerful teaching method that promotes student success.

RISE works with faculty interested in research in several ways:

BUGR Group.  The Bellevue UnderGraduate Research Group is a group of 11 faculty from 5 departments.  This group grew out a multidisciplinary team of BC faculty who traveled with RISE staff to an Institute on Initiating and Sustaining Undergraduate Research Programs at the University of Central Florida in January 2018. This faculty team drafted an action plan for building an undergraduate research program at BC.  As a product of the action plan, the group developed a successful Lockwood grant, funded in May 2018 by the BC Foundation. RISE, the Library, the Science Division and Social Science Division all matched those funds. With that support, the BUGR Group has redesigned their courses and begun to implement new research-based curriculum.  They will engage over 500 BC students in research this academic year. The following faculty are participating in the BUGR Group.

Lisa Lapointe, Library
Celeste Lonson, Psychology
Madhura Sohani, Psychology
Kathy Hunt, Anthropology
Tony Tessandori, Anthropology
Sonya Doucette, Chemistry
Grady Blacken, Chemistry
Rick Glover, Chemistry
Allison Kang, Biology
Jacqueline Miller, Biology
Cindy Xie, Biology

 

Curricular Guidance for Course-Based Authentic Research Experiences.  If you’re interested in bringing authentic research experiences into your course, the easiest way to get started is to talk with Jacqueline Miller, our Faculty Lead for Undergraduate Research, to explore options and connect to our faculty community of practice.

ComGen. The Community College Genomics (ComGen) Research Initiative is a community of practice of over 50 faculty members at 22 colleges.  All of these faculty engage students in course-based research, and many of them have created their own authentic research experiences.  The ComGen initiative hosted a free conference for Washington State faculty in the life sciences called “Expanding Course-based Undergraduate Research Experiences in Washington Community Colleges” on September 9-11 in Leavenworth, WA. Faculty participants learned about a new research protocol for DNA barcoding, shared best practices and curricula, and networked. Several useful resources may be found on the ComGen curriculum library

Research Proposal Development. We provide substantial assistance to faculty who are submitting research proposals and we can sometimes provide limited financial support.

Research Conference Travel. We also support faculty who wish to travel to present the results of their research. You may request such support with this online application. For more details about our support for research endeavors, please contact Michael Reese.

Research Collaborations. We have forged a one-of-a-kind collaboration with the Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center that has allowed BC faculty to become affiliates of the Hutch. This collaboration has paid off in other ways as well: Fred Hutch staff recently conducted a series of workshops on electron microscopy for BC personnel.

Student Research Presentations. We coordinate BC’s participation in the University of Washington’s Undergraduate Research Symposium, the largest celebration of undergraduate research on the West Coast.

Faculty Profile:
Dr. Jillene Grover Seiver
Jillene Grover Seiver

RISE is Innovation

Working with faculty to create, pilot, and scale innovations in teaching and learning is the heart of RISE’s mission.

Project-Based Learning. In 2017 and 2018, the RISE Learning Institute sent teams of faculty from across campus to the Institute for Project-Based Learning at Worcester Polytechnic Institute.  These faculty created a draft action plan to advance project-based learning at BC. They are also are working to add more projects to their courses, make their existing projects more impactful, and spread what they have learned about PBL.

Building on this work, RISE partnered with the Faculty Commons to launch our first Faculty Learning Community for PBL in 2018. Participants are learning from their colleagues in different departments, dipping into the scholarship of teaching and learning, and supporting one another as they redesign elements of their existing courses (or plan new courses). Members of the inaugural cohort include:

Seema Bahl, Sociology
Kurt Friedrich, Information Systems & Technology
Vidya Krishnamoorthy, Engineering
Annalisa Lembo, Biology
Nan Ma, English
Lindi Mujugira, Mathematics
Renee Nejo, Digital Media Arts
Sharon Romppanen, Early Learning & Teacher Ed
Fatma Serce, Computer Science
Tony Tessandori, Anthropology

Want to learn more about PBL? You can register for the upcoming Project-Based Learning Summit through the Faculty Commons. If you would like to learn more, connect with faculty engaged in this work, or discuss project options, you can reach out to Miranda Kato, Faculty Lead for Project-Based Learning. Miranda holds office hours in the Faculty Commons every Wednesday from 1:00 to 2:00. RISE also helps BC faculty connect to community and industry partners for project-based learning. If you are interested in working with an external partner in an upcoming course, please contact Michael Reese or Sapan Parekh.

Additional Support for Curricular Innovation.  The RISE Learning Institute may provide logistical assistance and financial support for faculty who are developing grant proposals focused on bringing innovative techniques or projects into the classroom experience. Depending on the purpose and size of the project, RISE may be able to give differing levels of support. To find out more, contact Michael Reese. In addition, RISE offers support to faculty who are seeking to present the results of their curricular innovations, research, or creative endeavors. You may request such support with this online application.

RISE is Service

Student learning can be greatly enhanced when service and community engagement are incorporated into their classrooms. However, the RISE Learning Institute recognizes that faculty may not know how best to do this, or may be wary of altering their already well-designed curricula. Nevertheless, Bellevue College and the RISE Learning Institute want to support those professors who have interest in bringing their classroom into the community in a meaningful way.

The What and How of Service-Learning. Service-Learning is a high impact teaching methodology that helps students meet their course learning outcomes, develop transferable “21st Century skills,” and develop a greater sense of civic responsibility and engagement. Service-learning accomplishes this through the meaningful integration of community-based service with a course curriculum. The service helps students make real what they’re learning in their class, and critical reflective activities or assignments help students draw out the learning that goes beyond the content. Read more.

Service-Learning Faculty Learning Community (FLC), in partnership with the Faculty Commons: Bellevue College has been tackling service-learning in a big way by offering a year-long FLC to those who want in-depth guidance into how to incorporate service into a course. We are currently in the third year of offering this learning community, which has helped to foster a growth in quality service-learning courses across campus. Faculty who participate receive professional development credits, a stipend, and the possibility of engaging in a larger way as ambassadors and facilitators for service-learning.

RISE will not be offering a Faculty Learning Community in 2020. It plans to support a Fall 2019 FLC that will equip faculty to build Climate Justice-focused service-learning into their classes.

Brown Bag Workshops, in partnership with the Faculty Commons: The RISE Learning Institute provides short workshops about civic engagement, service-learning, reflective pedagogies, partnership development, and more.  Currently, no workshops are being offered.

Support to Start a Class. Through one-on-one meetings, the RISE Learning Institute helps faculty determine the best way or ways to engage the community through their classrooms.  Therefore, if you have interest in adding service-learning or community-engaged learning to your class, or simply want to learn more about them, contact Sapan Parekh to set up a meeting. Additionally, instructors implementing service-learning for the first time may be required to attend a short orientation prior to the start of the quarter.

If you want to start a project-based service-learning class in Fall 2019, for which students work in teams to create something (e.g. animation, website, marketing plan, film, database, etc.) for a non-profit or government agency, reach out to Sapan Parekh. RISE can support you in finding partners and finalizing the projects, and thus lessen the time you spend in course preparation.

RISE also recognizes that lots of work can go into creating any innovative class, including a service-learning one. Therefore, we want to make sure that your class has students. One of the ways we do this is to compile of list of innovative courses utilizing high impact practices, and both posting it on the RISE website and sending it out to all students via email. Check out the listing of Spring 2019 courses. If you would like to be listed next quarter, let us know. And for subsequent quarters, send your courses to RISE the week before registration begins.

Transcript Notation for Service-Learning. Students have an opportunity to earn a special notation in their transcripts that officially acknowledges the successful completion of a service-learning course. This notation shows transfer institutions and potential employers that students have undertaken experience-based academic coursework, and have thus developed skills such as teamwork, client-engagement, problem-solving, empathy, and critical thinking. Therefore, the benefits of the notation are plenty, which is why RISE has heard many students express interest in receiving it. To do so, students must take a course that qualifies for the notation.

For Fall 2019, please review the Transcript Notation for Service-Learning Faculty Guide and submit your course syllabus and supporting documents to Sapan Parekh by the third week of the quarter.

Service-Learning Resources for Faculty. These resources have been compiled and vetted by RISE for use by faculty in service-learning courses. Additionally, service-learning at BC is facilitated using the new BC in the Community volunteer management portal. If you have not taught a service-learning course or used the portal before, please set up a meeting with RISE before starting. Additionally, if you choose to outreach to any of the agencies listed in the portal for a course, contact RISE first so it can inform the agencies and help facilitate the partnerships.

Faculty Profile:
Sonya Doucette

Sonya Remington Doucette - Profile Picture

RISE is Experiential Learning

The RISE Learning Institute supports and promotes a wide variety of high-impact experiential learning opportunities.  Of course, undergraduate research, project-based learning, and service-learning all provide great experiential education for students.  But RISE does not confine itself to these categories: our staff members are happy to work with faculty from all disciplines to brainstorm ways of bringing experiential learning into the classroom—and ways of connecting students to the world beyond BC.  Please feel free to reach out to us.

Administrative support. Faculty often make a connection with an outside partner or come across an experiential learning curriculum idea, project or space but they need the help to figure out how administratively that can be implemented at BC. RISE can help secure the permissions and administrative support you need to implement an experiential learning project. Check out an example of this type of support and how we helped Life Sciences faculty develop a long-term research plot in partnership with the Washington Department of Agriculture.

Internships. Internships are one of the most impactful forms of experiential education.  The Academic Internship Program, which is part of RISE’s Center for Career Connections, helps students in all majors connect to internships and other experiential learning opportunities.  If you would like the RISE staff to speak to your students about internships related to your field of study, please contact Chiew Jones, Associate Director for Experiential Learning, or Kristen Davey, Program Manager for Internships.

In addition, the Center for Career Connections runs a fantastic job and internship board, CONNECT, and you can let Chiew Jones know if you would like to receive a weekly email of internship opportunities in a particular field.

Last Updated July 18, 2019