Diversity Resources and Support

The following materials are used to increase awareness of different perspectives, values, and practices.  We also provide a limited funding opportunity for events and activities centered around identities and experiences that include, but not limited to: race, ethnicity, gender, sexuality, age, ability, and health.

Diversity Resources

This calendar includes religous observances of major faiths represneted within the United States.  Information provided by Anti-Defamation League.

  • 2019 or 2020 religious calendar of observances.
  • Racial/Ethnic/Gender/Sexuality/Age/Ability/Health Monthly Focus provided by: Anti-Defamation League, Diversity Central, and Library of Congress.
    • September: Hispanic/Latino Heritage Month (Sept.15-Oct.15), Prostate Health Month, Yoga Month, Pain Awareness Month
    • October: Cultural Diversity Month, LGBT History Month, Disability Employment Awareness Month, Filipino American History Month, Italian American Heritage Month, German American Heritage Month, Polish American Heritage Month, Aids Awareness Month, Breast Cancer Awareness Month, Bullying Prevention Month, Domestic Violence Awareness Month
    • November: Native American Heritage Month
    • December: N/A
    • January: Slavery and Human Trafficking Prevention Month
    • February: African American History Month, American Heart Month
    • March: Women’s History Month, Developmental Disabilities Awareness Month, National Deaf History Month (Mar.13-Apr.15), Irish-American Heritage Month
    • April: Autism Acceptance Month, Holocaust Remembrance Month, Scottish American Heritage Month, Arab American Heritage Month, Sexual Assault Awareness Month
    • May: Asian American and Pacific Islander Heritage Month, Older American’s Month, Jewish American Heritage Month, Haitian Heritage Month, Stroke Awareness Month, Celiac Awareness Month
    • June: LGBT Pride Month, Caribbean-American Heritage Month, Alzheimer’s & Brain Awareness Month,
    • July: N/A
    • August: N/A

Washington State Council of Presidents provided a press release in Sept. 5, 2017, that we will support our undocumented students. We also have guidance concerning immigration enforcement provided by the Attorney General, Bob Ferguson. All students are protected by FERPA and it “does not contain an exception for federal immigration agencies.  Therefore, requests from these agencies to disclose student records or personally identifiable information contained in student records should be denied unless a FERPA exception applies (p.34, guidance concerning immigration enforcement).  Exceptions include judicial order or lawfully issued subpoena, which requires well enough in advance to give the student and/or parents time to seek a protective order. If the judicial order or subpoena specifically orders the school to refrain from such notification.

(ICE Procedures PDF)

Bellevue College processes ensures our staff that we will do the following verification procedures from an ICE Agent’s visit:

  • Documents provided are signed by a judge.
  • Properly identifies the agency with authority to search.
  • Correctly identifies the search location(s).
  • Includes the correct date and has not expired.
  • References a specific person; if so, allow ICE to contact or question only that person.

After Hour Visits from ICE protocol:

  •  The AVP of Student Affairs, at (503) 567-9185

Resources

The following acknowledgement statement was created by a Bellevue College faculty member, Christina Sciabarra. We want to recognize this goes beyond a gesture. It becomes meaningful when coupled with an authentic relationship and informed action. This beginning offers an opening to greater public consciousness of the history of labor that includes reconciliation.

If you choose to include a Labor Acknowledgement statement within your syllabus, please follow the information, guidance, and resources provided.

LABOR ACKNOLWEDGEMENT STATEMENT

We also pause to recognize and acknowledge the labor upon which our country, state, and institution are built.

We remember that our country is built on the labor of enslaved people who were kidnapped and brought to the US from the African continent and recognize the continued contribution of their survivors.  We also acknowledge all immigrant labor including voluntary, involuntary, trafficked, forced, and undocumented peoples who contributed to the building of the country and continue to serve within our labor force.  We acknowledge all unpaid care-giving labor .

Finally, we acknowledge that our institution relies on hourly, student, contingent, and unpaid labor and we recognize those contributions.

MOVING BEYOND ACKNOLWEDGEMENT

  • Recognize how labor is valued in both compensated and uncompensated. Practice of mindfulness and appreciation for work done by others regardless of social status, income, or executive power.
  • Discuss oppression and privilege in your class to disrupt hierarchies of power and control.
  • Make connections to the environment and the impact it has on people, health, wellness, and community.
  • Recognize people as contributors of the workforce and identify the contributions of people(s) without power or control within curriculum content.
  • Recognize the power of representation within the curriculum content and challenge it with resources/readings/references of different work contributions of voluntary, involuntary, trafficked, forced, and undocumented peoples who contributed to our labor market.
  • Facilitate students learning about different forms of work and visit different working environments outside of the classroom.

Acknowledgment alone is simply a gesture. It becomes meaningful when coupled with an authentic relationship and informed action. This beginning offers an opening to greater public consciousness of Native sovereignty and cultural rights, a step toward equitable relationship and reconciliation.

If you choose to include a Land and Territory Acknowledgement within your syllabus, please follow the information, guidance, and resources provided.

WHY INTRODUCE THE PRACTICE OF LAND AND TERRITORY ACKNOWLEDGMENT?

Offer recognition and respect. Counter the “doctrine of discovery” with the true story of the people who were already here. Create a broader public awareness of the history that has led to this moment. Begin to repair relationships with Native communities and with the land. Support larger truth-telling and reconciliation efforts.Remind people that colonization is an  ongoing process, with Native lands still occupied due to deceptive and broken treaties. Take a cue from indigenous protocol and open a space with reverence and respect.

LAND AND TERRITORY ACKNOWLEDGEMENT STATEMENT

“We pause to acknowledge that Bellevue College resides on the traditional land of the Coast Salish Peoples that includes but is not limited to: Snoqualmie, Suquamish, Duwamish, Nisqually, and Muckleshoot (Smulkamish, Stkamish, Skopamish, and Upper Puyallup) Peoples past and present. We remember their connection to the region and recognize their struggles with systemic oppression. We commit to care for the land and center equity at the core of our (un)learning.”

MOVING BEYOND ACKNOWLEDGEMENT

  • Recognize how colonialism is an ongoing process and that the practice of mindfulness and reverence of the land is indigenous protocol.
  • Discuss oppression and privilege in your class to disrupt colonization and assimilation.
  • Make connections to the environment and the impact it has on people, health, wellness, and community.
  • Recognize people as caregivers of the land and identify sustainability practices in curriculum content.
  • Recognize the power of representation within the curriculum content and challenge it with resources/readings/references of different thoughts/behaviors/people.
  • Facilitate students learn about different cultures and visit different cultural spaces outside of the classroom.

PDF available for Land and Territory Acknowledgement 9.13.2019

Faculty and staff at Bellevue College are invited to participate in a campaign to show your acceptance, support, and protection of a student and/or family member that discloses themselves as undocumented.

WHY BE AN UNAFRIAD EDUCATOR

We believe schools should be safe spaces that embrace all students and families, regardless of citizenship, national origin, unaccompanied children, and refugee status. The 1982 U.S. Supreme Court case Plyeler V. Doe ruled that undocumented children have a constitutional right to receive a free public K-12 education, which provides a means to become a “self-reliant and self-sufficient participant in society.” We hold this to be the “fundamental values necessary to the maintenance of a democratic political system.”

Flyer that indicates faculty as an unafraid educator that stands for undocumented students as an employee at the college.

Diversity Support

The Office of Equity, Diversity, and Inclusion (OEDI) has limited funds to assist with events that address equity, diversity, and inclusion. Limited funds are available for professional development with a requirement to provide service hours to the college.

Three payment options exist (it depends on situation):

  1. Pay out of pocket, and submit reimbursement form to our office.
  2. Purchase Card may be used, requires visit to office to complete.
  3. Submission of an A19 payment to Finance, visit office to obtain budget number.

Click here to continue and complete request form

Last Updated October 14, 2019