New Students

Steve Ferreira in wheelchair

Welcome!

This page gives an overview the process to get registered with the DRC and includes Frequently Asked Questions at the end. You may apply for services at any time. However, timely application (4 to 6 weeks before the start of the quarter) will help facilitate timely approval and setup of your accommodation(s).

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Please note: information regarding your disability is confidential! This means registration with the DRC will not go on any transcripts, will not be shared with other colleges or universities, and is generally not shared with faculty, staff, or other students until you give us permission. Bellevue College (BC) complies with the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act of 1974 (FERPA).

Please note: our office supports students in all High School Programs such as Running Start.  We accept Individualized Education Plan (IEP) and 504 plans as meeting your documentation requirement but college accommodations are different from high school alterations so whether you are coming to BC from high school or are part of any High School Programs, we recommend you review our page on accommodations differences from secondary school to higher education to be prepared. These differences will be discussed with you in step 2 of the registration process if you have any questions.

 

Getting Registered with the DRC is easy as 1, 2, 3!

We also recommend you complete the BC admissions application before applying for DRC services. If you have questions about this process or need assistance please contact our office at any time.  We are excited to have you as part of our campus community!

Step 1: Submit DRC Initial Access Form

Submit the MyDRC Initial Access Form; you will need a BC email address and password, as well as a Student ID (SID), so please be sure complete the BC admissions application before attempting to fill out the Initial Access Form.  Additionally, we have posted tutorials on how to complete the MyDRC Initial Access Form – please visit MyDRC User Guide.

If you have difficulty with the MyDRC Initial Access Form, you can visit DRC Forms for an electronic or paper version.

Step 2: Participate in an Initial Access Appointment

Once you have submitted an Initial Access Form, you will be contacted to schedule an Initial Access Appointment. Your meeting will give you an opportunity to identify your needs, understand DRC policies, discuss academic goals, and determine accommodations that will ensure access. Some students choose to have a friend or family member with them at this meeting. As stated earlier, your registration with us is confidential so you may have anyone join after discussing and completing a Student Information Release Form we have on hand in the office.

Please Note:  Due to our office working remotely, Initial Access Meetings will continue to happen, but will also happen remotely.  These may happen over the phone or via teleconferencing.  When an Access Specialist contacts you they will explain the available options in an email.  As part of this process you will be expected to electronically sign documents and provide a copy of valid ID – either a scan or a photo – as needed.

During this time of practiced physical distancing it is especially important that you check your BC email often for communications from the college.  We appreciate your understanding and cooperation during this uncertain time.

Step 3: Submit Documentation

Please note! Every individual situation is unique; regardless of what medical documentation you may or may not have, please contact our office to have a discussion about how we may be able to support your academic goals.  We understand both generally and during COVID19 times, obtaining documentation may be difficult and want to work with you regardless of your what documentation you may or may not have.  Eventually students should provide documentation that is a clear, objective medical/clinical evaluation of the disability reflecting the student’s functional limitations in an educational setting.  You and your Access Coordinator can discuss this during your Initial Access Meetings.  While the DRC does not offer testing or assessment of disability, we can refer you to professionals in the community who can provide these services.

If you have electronic copies of your documentation, you can submit them when you fill out your MyDRC Initial Access Form. If you have paper copies, you are welcome to mail or drop them off with the DRC in advance of your Initial Access Meeting, or bringing them to the meeting will work too.

Congrats, you’re officially registered with the DRC!

Don’t forget to:

  1.  Meet with an academic advisor who will work closely with you to determine an educational plan for your time at BC and provide continuing advising assistance throughout your study. More information is available on the Academic Advising website.  If you are enrolling in a Professional/technical program, plan to meet with the faculty advisor from that program. A program guide to Bellevue College’s Professional/technical programs is available in the online catalog.
  2. Register for Classes and use the DRC’s new database, MyDRC, to request accommodations each quarter.  A request for accommodations lets us know that you are registered for the quarter and we can then coordinate and plan your accommodations. Request accommodations as soon as possible after you register for classes; for tutorials on how to use MyDRC, check out the MyDRC User Guide page.  The college will provide a registration appointment date and time to students who are currently enrolled and to new students who turn in their applications by the application due date.

 

Services the DRC Does and Does Not Provide

Curious about what the DRC does?  Below are services our office provides:

  • Initial Access Meeting
  • Assessment of disability accommodation needs, using the information discuss in your Initial Access Meeting as well as your documentation
  • Coordination of accommodations with faculty and staff, some of our accommodations include:
  • Assistance with problem-solving concerning educational barriers you may be facing
  • Advocacy for disability-related withdrawals, incompletes, course substitution or waiver petitions

Below are services our office does not provide:

  • Personal-care attendants
  • Equipment and software for off-campus use
  • Learning Disability testing or assessment
  • Transportation
  • Tutoring Services
  • Financial Assistance
  • Guides to and from class or around campus
  • Modified coursework

 

Student Responsibilities

Accommodations require shared responsibility among students, faculty, the DRC and the institution. Faculty responsibilities are listed on the Faculty page. Student responsibilities include:

  1. Self-identifying as having a disability and completing the DRC registration process
  2. Costs associated with obtaining documentation
  3. Making reasonable and timely requests for accommodations as well as confirming the arrangements for accommodations
  4. Notifying the DRC of any concerns they may have regarding equal access
  5. Following the institutional appeal process

 

Frequently Asked Questions

What kind of documentation do I need to have for alternative testing?

Every individual situation is unique; regardless of what medical documentation you may or may not have, please contact our office to have a discussion about how we may be able to support your academic goals.  We understand both generally and during COVID19 times, obtaining documentation may be difficult and want to work with you regardless of your what documentation you may or may not have.  Eventually students should provide documentation that is a clear, objective medical/clinical evaluation of the disability reflecting the student’s functional limitations in an educational setting.  You and your Access Coordinator can discuss this during your Initial Access Meetings.

Can I have tutoring services?

The Disability Resource Center does not provide tutoring. However, Bellevue College does have tutoring, including online services, available through the Academic Success Center.

Will someone proof my papers?

The DRC does not proof papers.  The Writing Lab is set up to provide this service.

Do I have to take math even if I won’t be using it in my job?

Intermediate Algebra proficiency and a college level math class, or logic are required for an Associates in Arts and Science Degree. Some vocational programs do not require math. It is best to meet with an advisor to discuss your options and make an academic plan.  Please bring up any concerns you have about math with your Access Specialist during your Initial Access Meeting to get registered with the DRC.

Are online classes easier than traditional classes?

Online classes are reading intensive and require self-monitoring and motivation. Some students find it difficult to take online classes because there are not as many opportunities to get clarification from instructors. Others like taking classes online because they like to work from home and sticking to a schedule.

Can the DRC pay for my classes?

The DRC does not have funding for classes. We do refer students to campus and community programs that have funding resources and we post scholarship opportunities in our office. The Financial Aid office, the Center for Career Connections & Women’s CenterMulticultural Student Services, and Basic Food Employment and Training Program have funding resources for qualifying students.  The Division of Vocational Rehabilitation may be an option for some students.  Please also visit the Financial Resources for Disabled Students section on our Community Resources page.

How do I get my documentation?

Every individual situation is unique; regardless of what medical documentation you may or may not have, please contact our office to have a discussion about how we may be able to support your academic goals.  We understand both generally and during COVID19 times, obtaining documentation may be difficult and want to work with you regardless of your what documentation you may or may not have.  Eventually students should provide documentation that is a clear, objective medical/clinical evaluation of the disability reflecting the student’s functional limitations in an educational setting.  You and your Access Coordinator can discuss this during your Initial Access Meetings.

If the disability is medical, documentation can be requested from your doctor or specialist. If you have learning disabilities you should work to obtain diagnostics from testing done by educational psychologists/neuropsychiatrists, or learning disability specialists. If you have insurance this may be paid for by your or your parent/guardians’ plan. If you have no insurance, referrals to appropriate vocational rehabilitation programs may be possible. The DRC may be able refer you to a community professional who can provided appropriate testing and assessment for educational accommodations.

Can you help me ask for documentation from my Doctor?

If you have difficulty in obtaining documentation, please come to the DRC and sign a release of information form; remember to bring your doctor or school’s name and contact information.  The DRC will then request the documentation to assist you in this process. This is done only after you’ve tried unsuccessfully to obtain your doctor’s diagnosis information.

Can I get extended time if I have test anxiety?

Test anxiety is not classified as a disability. Some disabilities that may include anxiety are depression, Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD), and general anxiety disorder. If test anxiety is part of your disability, you should get registered with our office.

Can the DRC help me pay for books and supplies?

The DRC does not have funding for students’ educational expenses.  Please visit the Financial Resources for Disabled Students section on our Community Resources page.

I had an IEP in high school. Can I have extended time for class work?

IEPs are individual educational plans for special education programs in the K-12 environment. There is no special education program in colleges/universities. Reduced course content is not possible and extensions on homework/class projects may not possible. If there are legitimate emergencies due to accidents, illness, or surgery, advocacy can be provided on a case by case basis with the instructor. Your self advocacy is also required in this situation.  Whether you are coming to BC from high school or are part of any High School Programs, we recommend you review our page on accommodations differences from secondary school to higher education so you can be prepared. These differences will be discussed with you in step 2 of the registration process if you have any questions.

Can I obtain a disability parking sticker from the security office?

The Washington State disabled parking placard, plate, decal or tab as well as identification card is necessary to park in the disability parking spaces on campus. Contact your doctor to request one if you qualify under state law.

Can I take the COMPASS assessment with accommodations?

Yes, please contact the DRC to determine what accommodations may be appropriate and if documentation is necessary.

Can you help me get into a class that is full?

No, disabled students receive equal access to classes and as such must join a class the way other students do. In other words, a student who has a disability does not have priority status for entrance if the class is full.

I know I am late to register, but I need Braille/interpreters/adaptive equipment/etc. set up for classes next week. Is this possible?

These accommodations can take weeks to set up. You may be too late for these auxiliary aids. Our procedures indicate 4 weeks at a minimum to have these accommodations in place the beginning of the quarter, Braille can take even longer.  We will make a good faith effort to provide on short notice; however, the reality is that given such short time lines it is doubtful this could happen.

Last Updated May 11, 2020