Zoom-to-Panopto 2: Class Recordings to Class Folder

If you are using Zoom to host your class meetings, you can record those meetings so that you and your students can watch them later. With our Zoom-to-Panopto integration, not only are your Zoom Cloud recordings automatically being moved into your Panopto My Folder > Meeting Recordings folder, you can also choose to move recordings of specific Zoom meeting IDs (your class meetings) to a specific class folder in Panopto, which only the students in that class (and you) have access. You could optionally also embed these class recordings into a Canvas page using the Panopto Recordings embed tool. This is ideal for faculty who wish to ensure the privacy of their class recordings since our classes could frequently include audio and video of our students. To me as a teacher, this is the coolest aspect of our Zoom-to-Panopto integration.

Here’s how:

Overview

1. In Zoom, set up your recurring class meetings to automatically record to the Zoom Cloud.
2. In the corresponding Canvas course, enable the Panopto Recordings navigation item.
3. In Panopto, connect the Zoom meeting ID that you created in step 1 above to your new Panopto Recordings folder.
4. Optionally, embed your class recordings into a Canvas page. assignment, discussion, etc.

How to make this magic? Read step-by-step directions below:

First things first

If you haven’t already, set up a recurring Zoom meeting for one class. Set it to record to the cloud automatically.

Information that you need

Before we get started with this integration, you’ll need two pieces of information for each class:

  1. the Course ID
  2. the Zoom meeting ID for the corresponding class meeting.

Enable Class Panopto Recordings folder

In Canvas, go to your chosen class. (As an example, I went to my BTS 168 Business Data Management Tools class.) Then go to the course Settings, the Navigation tab, and enable the “Panopto Recordings” navigation item. Be sure to Save this change.

Connect Zoom meeting ID to Class Recordings folder

Actually connecting your class’s Zoom recordings to the folder you just created requires you to open your Panopto user settings page.

To do that, click on the little ↗ arrow at the top right of any Panopto page — the screen tip will say “Open in Panopto.” That opens a new tab in your browser, with the Panopto logo top left. You’re actually on the Panopto server now.

Click on your name, top right, then from the pulldown menu, “User Settings.” At the bottom of the user settings page, there is a heading named “Zoom Recording Import Settings.”

Click on “Add New.” Here is where you enter your Zoom meeting ID for this class, and next to it, browse to the folder for this class’s recordings. (For my above class, it was the “Spr 2020 – 4115B904 BTS 168 Business Data Management Tools” folder.) Be sure to Save that connection.

Once you’ve saved that connection, students will be able to watch your Zoom class recordings by going to your Canvas class and clicking “Panopto Recordings” in the left navigation area.

Extra credit: Embed your class recordings in a Canvas page

This is another nice way to allow students to watch these recordings. Go into your Canvas class, create a new page (or anywhere you wish students to be able to watch your class recordings, such as a Discussion, Quiz, or Assignment). Then, using the “More External Tools” menu in the rich content editor (looks like the grey “V”), choose the Panopto video you wish students to watch. As long as you only post your class recordings in the correct class, then only those students will be able to watch them!

Screenshot of the Canvas rich text editor, with the Panopto embed tool highlighted

That’s it!

Your Zoom Cloud recordings for this class will now automatically be copied into the Panopto Recordings folder for that class, where only students in that class will be able to view them. Also, by embedding the video in a Canvas page, you’ll give your students another nice way to watch.

Let us know if you need any help with this integration.

Last Updated April 18, 2020