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BIOL& 213 Biology Majors Plant or Cellular or Animal • 6 Cr.

Department

Division

Description:

Third in a three-course sequence for science majors and pre-professional students. Topics include plant anatomy, physiology, evolution, and ecology. Prerequisite: BIOL& 211.

Outcomes:

After completing this class, students should be able to:

  • Continue use of biology laboratory equipment and tools and techniques correctly to observe specimens and to design and perform experiments using the methodology of scientific inquiry.
  • Continue application of general conceptual skills (e.g., observation, problem solving, hypothesis generation and testing) that are used in the sciences.
  • Continue collecting, recording, analyzing, interpreting and evaluating biological data during laboratory investigations and communicating these interpretations in writing.
  • Continue to interpret and summarize scientific literature.
  • Compare and contrast the major characteristics of the diversity of organisms within the Archaea, Bacteria, Protista, Fungi and Plantae.
  • Evaluate the economic, ecological, cultural and evolutionary significance of representatives of the Archaea, Bacteria, Protista, Fungi and Plantae
  • Explain the evolutionary development of life cycles and provide representative examples of life cycles in protists, fungi and major plant groups.
  • Describe the evolutionary trends evident in plant taxa.
  • Describe evolutionary trends in plants and plant ancestors in relation to the transition from the aquatic to the terrestrial environment.
  • Explain the significance of photosynthetic organisms to the survival of all life on earth
  • Explain the functional significance of differences in plant anatomy and morphology with regard to growth, transport mechanisms and nutrition.
  • Identify the anatomical and morphological parts of roots, stems, leaves, flowers, fruits and seeds.
  • Describe reproduction and development processes of flowering plants.
  • Distinguish between various pollination mechanisms using floral characteristics and pollination strategies
  • Describe dispersal mechanisms and the relationship of fruit and seed morphology to dispersal.
  • Describe plant chemical growth regulators and their effects on plant growth and development.
  • Provide examples of environmental controls of plant growth and development
  • Describe plant defense mechanisms to their environment.
  • List the characteristics of Earth’s biomes
  • Evaluate the role of biotic and abiotic factors in ecological processes such as energy flow and nutrient cycles.
  • Describe the ecological significance of species interactions such as predation, competition and symbiosis
  • Recognize the general principles of population dynamics and community ecology as they relate to biodiversity and ecosystem stability
  • Apply understanding of our earth's sustainability issues in relation to human-induced environmental stresses such as pollution, global warming, habitat loss, etc.
  • Describe plant defense mechanisms to their environment.
  • Explain the significance of photosynthetic organisms to the survival of all life on earth
  • Compare and contrast the major characteristics of the diversity of organisms within the Archaea, Bacteria, Protista, Fungi and Plantae.
  • Evaluate the economic, ecological, cultural and evolutionary ignificance of representatives of the Archaea, Bacteria, Protista, Fungi and Plantae
  • Explain the evolutionary development of life cycles and provide representative examples of life cycles in protists, fungi and major plant groups.
  • Describe the evolutionary trends evident in plant taxa.
  • List the characteristics of Earth’s biomes
  • Evaluate the role of biotic and abiotic factors in ecological processes such as energy flow and nutrient cycles.
  • Describe the ecological significance of species interactions such as predation, competition and symbiosis
  • Recognize the general principles of population dynamics and community ecology as they relate to biodiversity and ecosystem stability
  • Apply understanding of the effect of the current use of earth by humans in the context of environmental stresses such as pollution, global warming, habitat loss, etc.
  • Continue use of biology laboratory equipment and tools and techniques correctly to observe specimens and to design and perform experiments using the methodology of scientific inquiry.
  • Continue application of general conceptual skills (e.g., observation, problem solving, hypothesis generation and testing) that are used in the sciences.
  • Continue collecting, recording, analyzing, interpreting and evaluating biological data during laboratory investigations and communicating these interpretations in laboratory reports.
  • Continue to interpret and summarize scientific literature.

Offered:

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Contact info

Bellevue College
3000 Landerholm Circle SE Bellevue, WA 98007-6484 U.S.A.
Work: (425) 564-1000